Here Are The Winners And Losers From Trump's "Border Tax Adjustment"

Potential Winners: Companies with a majority of their input costs contained within the U.S; Potentially lower tax rate of 20% on sales and full deduction for input costs; U.S. Exporters: as export revenues are not subject to U.S. tax.
Potential Losers:Products, services, and intangibles imported into the U.S.; Automakers, Oil and Gas, to Retailers can be impacted; U.S. Multinationals that have relied on aggressive tax planning to shift earning overseas.

Deutsche Bank Rejects Charge It Is An "Economic Terrorist"

Deutsche Bank’s Turkish unit rejected claims that it’s plotting to undermine the economy, and said it’s “unacceptable” for the lender’s name to be associated with terrorism. The statement came after the daily Yeni Safak accused Deutsche Bank and other German institutions of “economic terror” against Turkey by recalling loans to companies before their their due dates.

The Eight Forces That Are Pressuring Profits

If there is any economic assumption that goes unquestioned, it's the notion that profits will remain robust for the foreseeable future. This assumption ignores the tidal forces that are now flowing against profits.

Consumer Confidence Disappoints As Trump Hope Dips

After surging to 12-year highs in December, following Trump's election victory, UMich consumer sentiment faded in January and missed expectations (98.1 vs 98.5 exp). While inflation outlooks picked up modestly off record lows, economic 'expectations' - hope - dipped from 89.5 to 88.9 as the Trump Bump appears to have stalled.

JPM Earnings Jump On Slashed Expenses, FICC Trading Beats As Equity, IB Misses; Credit Card Charge-Offs Spike

In a report that was somewhat similar to that of Bank of America,  JPM reported Q4 revenues of $23.4 billion, beating estimates of $23.1 billion, on EPS of $1.71, far higher than the expected $1.42, which however like in the case of BofA was due to a cut in expenses, which came in at $6.87 billion, far below the $7.2 billion, suggesting even greater expense - i.e. compensation - reductions.

Oil Erases Saudi Jawbone Gains Amid China Glut Concerns

Oil prices rallied the last couple of days on the heels of Saudi jawboning about just how much they cut production, after concerns on US shale production surging. However, prices are falling back as despite near-record imports of crude reported overnight in China, it appears that historical demand has 'glutted' refiners (who exported record product in 2016) leaving a slew of oil tankers stranded off the Chinese coast.

Where's The Outrage?

The left goes nuts when a private company is contractually obliged to use its own money to pay off a failed CEO. But when left-wing politicians collude with their public union supporters to rack up unpayable pension bills in the trillions, we get... crickets.

Renault Shares Tumble After Anti-Fraud Authority Accusations Of "Cheating" On Emissions Tests

Yesterday we sarcastically noted "they are all at it" when Fiat Chrysler was slammed by the EPA for emissions cheating, and now get further confirmation of the farce as The FT reports, French authorities have started a preliminary investigation into Renault amid suspicion the company may have “cheated” to conceal abnormal emissions of pollutants from some of its diesel engines.

Futures Rise On Friday 13th Ahead Of Deluge Of Bank Earnings; Dollar Continues To Decline

European shares rose as Fiat rebounded on hopes concerns about parallel to Volkswagen are overblown, Asian stocks were little as Chinese shares fell to the lowest level of 2017 after poor export data, and U.S. equity-index futures rose ahead of a deluge of bank earnings. The dollar is headed for a weekly loss and gold trades at the highest price in almost two months.

Guggenheim: "3% Is The Beginning Of The End"

"3% is basically the beginning of the end... as the business cycle ages, in 2019, 2020 when we could anticipate we might have another recession, that there will be another deflationary burst that will bring rates back down if we do get above 3%, but we haven't violated that trend yet."