Saxo Bank CEO: "The Election Outcome In Britain Is Our One Chance To Say Stop To Brussels"

When you, like me, are used to a proportional representation system, it feels bizarre that the third largest party hardly gains a seat, but still, Nigel Farage has had a lot of beneficial influence on Britain's EU policy.  Hopefully, Brussels also gets the message but I doubt it. The EU never rolls anything back. It continues to amass more and more control in all areas.  The bureaucracy in Brussels has no self-criticism. No regrets. No matter how much and how often it fails. It just continues the roll out of its powers, and it will continue unabated, until someone says enough is enough. Until someone says stop.   The election outcome in Britain is our one chance to say stop!

Frontrunning: May 8

  • Ed Miliband, Nick Clegg and Nigel Farage resign as Tories sweep to victory (Telegraph)
  • Bonds and stocks rebound, sterling soars after UK election (Reuters)
  • Cameron Set to Return With U.K. Majority as SNP Sweeps Scotland (BBG)
  • Tory win brings marked EU exit risk (Reuters)
  • Why did Labour lose this election? It never tried to win it (Telegraph)
  • Stock Buybacks Hit New Records (WSJ)
  • Hard Money Comes Easy as Wall Street Funds Home Flippers (BBG)
  • Justice Department to Investigate Baltimore Police (WSJ)
  • Saudi Arabia mulling land operations on Yemen border (Reuters)

Payrolls Preview - Hope Abounds Amid Better-Weather Boost

The last two months have been nothing if not a lesson in the disater that is the economic-forecasters of the world. With a 3-sigma beat followed by a 5-sigma miss, hope abounds that April will be the 'goldilocks' print - just cold enough to leave the Fed on hold and just hot enough to 'prove' growth remains. Goldman expects nonfarm payroll job growth of 230k in April, in line with consensus expectations. While labor market indicators were mixed in April, the employment components of service sector surveys were strong and better weather conditions should provide a boost. In addition, they see some upside risk to the forecast from a calendar effect, and expect the unemployment rate to decline by one-tenth to 5.4% and average hourly earnings to rise 0.2%.

Futures Rise Following "Dramatic" UK Election Result, All Eyes On Payrolls

While the US is waking up in anticipation of what is once again said to be the "most important nonfarm payrolls number" at least since the last most important such number, because anything 250,000 and above puts the June rate hike right back on the Fed calendar, while a collapse in this lagging indicator will be explained away with harsh rain showers in April, and send stocks soaring due to yet another delay in tightening expectations despite Yellen's outright warning of overvalued stocks, the UK has been up all night following a dramatic election, whose outcome has been largely the opposite of what the experts predicted, with Conservatives set to win an outright majority, resulting in embarrassment for Labor, the Liberal Democrats and the UKIP, both of which have already seen dramatic changes in their leadership, and moments ago both Nick Clegg and Nigel Farage announced they would stand down as party leaders.

Negotiations - Greek Style

With deadlines looming ever closer - and the Germans far more pessimistic than the Greeks - we await the next hurdle to slow the process...

New Russian High-Tech Tank Suffers BSOD Moment During Army Parade

Russia unveiled its new main battle tank as part of practices for Saturday's Victory Day parade (commemorating the end of WWII). According to RT, the Armata "is a cutting-edge vehicle with an unmanned turret armed with a brand new 125 mm smoothbore cannon, which is the most powerful gun of its kind to date in terms of muzzle energy." You decide...

Janet Yellen: A 'Bear' Late & A 'Dollar' Short

There is grave danger in the lack of momentum, as momentum serves as an indirect proxy for belief and rationalizations. Once they fade away it is harder to deny reality any longer. At the very least, top or not, it seems as if investors all across the financial landscape are themselves are losing faith not just in monetary policy and the economy but maybe even the idea that this was anything more than yet another bear market rally. Even Janet Yellen might think so; after all the “dollar” beat her to it.

Presenting The Best (And Worst) College Majors

Rising tuition rates, high unemployment among recent graduates, and an anemic economic recovery have many questioning the once inviolable notion that a college education is the best way to ensure high-paying, full-time employment. A new study from Georgetown looks at the best and worst majors for those looking to maximize their annual income. 

In A Cop Culture, The Bill Of Rights Doesn't Amount To Much

“In a democratic society,” observed Oakland police chief Sean Whent, “people have a say in how they are policed.” Unfortunately, if you can be kicked, punched, tasered, shot, intimidated, harassed, stripped, searched, brutalized, terrorized, wrongfully arrested, and even killed by a police officer, and that officer is never held accountable for violating your rights and his oath of office to serve and protect, never forced to make amends, never told that what he did was wrong, and never made to change his modus operandi, then you don’t live in a constitutional republic. You live in a police state.

US Approves Saudi Use Of Banned Cluster Bombs (But Only If They're Extra Careful)

Following a report on Sunday, where Human Rights Watch said video and photographic evidence showed that Saudi Arabia used cluster bombs near villages in Yemen’s Saada Province at least two separate times, the US State Department said it is "looking into" the allegations but, as Foreign Policy reports, said the notoriously imprecise weapon — banned by much of the world — could still have an appropriate role to play in Riyadh’s U.S.-backed offensive (as long as it was used carefully).

Guest Post: The Big Business Of Cancer - 100 Billion Dollars Was Spent On Cancer Drugs Last Year Alone

If you are an American, there is a 1 in 3 chance that you will get cancer during your lifetime.  If you are a man, the odds are closer to 1 in 2.  And almost everyone in America either knows someone who currently has cancer or who has already died from cancer.  But it wasn’t always this way.  Back in the 1940s, only one out of every sixteen Americans would develop cancer. Despite billions spent on research and all of the technological progress we have made over the years this plague just continues to spiral wildly out of control.  Why is that?

Why We Have An Oversupply Of Almost Everything

What happens is that economic growth eventually runs into limits. Many people have assumed that these limits would be marked by high prices and excessive demand for goods. In my view, the issue is precisely the opposite one: Limits to growth are instead marked by low prices and inadequate demand. Common workers can no longer afford to buy the goods and services that the economy produces, because of inadequate wage growth. The price of all commodities drops, because of lower demand by workers. Furthermore, investors can no longer find investments that provide an adequate return on capital, because prices for finished goods are pulled down by the low demand of workers with inadequate wages.

What The US Government Spends Its Money On, Besides Hookers And Gambling

The one most interesting category was defense spending: a category despised by progressives even though at this rate spending on interest for the progressives' beloved government debt will soon eclipse defense. It is here that outlays actually dropped from a year ago, declining to just over $150 billion for the quarter. Which is surprising, because as Politico wrote overnight, among the items funded by general taxpayer revenue were such discretionary expenses as hookers and blackjack, after a defense department audit founds that Pentagon employees used their government credit cards to gamble and pay for “adult entertainment.”

Global Trade To Remain Subdued Until At Least 2020, Goldman Says

"The transition from investment to consumption in the Chinese economy, together with a shift towards cleaner energy sources, has caused a sharp deceleration in dry bulk trade. After expanding at an average annual rate of 7% over the period 2005-14, seaborne demand in iron ore, thermal and metallurgical coal is set to increase by only 2% in 2015 to 2.5 billion tonnes as these trends persist," Goldman says, before warning that freight rates aren't likely to recover until at least 2020.