• GoldCore
    07/30/2014 - 18:58
    “But long term...and economic law says, if you keep printing a lot of paper money, the value of the dollar and currency will go down, and things and most prices will go up and indeed gold always goes...

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Frontrunning: June 5

  • Spain says markets are closing to it as G7 confers (Reuters)
  • Germany Pushes EU Bank Oversight (WSJ)
  • Falling Oil Prices Are No Mystery (Bloomberg)
  • Aussie Rises After RBA Cuts Rate Less Than Swaps Suggest (Bloomberg)
  • Euro falls on Spain worries as market awaits G7 (Reuters)
  • Bad News Piles Up for China's Economy (Bloomberg)
  • Japan Lawmakers Push to Curb Central Bank (WSJ)
  • Lawyer Kluger Gets 12 Years, Bauer 9 for Insider Trades (Bloomberg)
  • All eyes on Wisconsin governor's recall election (Reuters)
  • The Global Obesity Bomb (BusinessWeek)


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Spain Caves, Admits It Needs European Bailout

And so those lining up at the bailout trough are now 4: remember all those lies Spain spoon-fed the gullible press that it didn't need a European bailout as recently as yesterday? You can now forget them. From Reuters: "Spain said on Tuesday that credit markets were closing to the euro zone's fourth biggest economy as finance chiefs of the Group of Seven major economies were to hold emergency talks on the currency bloc's worsening debt crisis. Treasury Minister Cristobal Montoro sent out the dramatic distress signal in a radio interview about the impact of his country's banking crisis on government borrowing, saying that at current rates, financial markets were effectively shut to Spain. Montoro said Spanish banks should be recapitalised through European mechanisms, departing from the previous government line that Spain could raise the money on its own and and prompting the Madrid stock market to rise. But his comments on Spain's borrowing sent the euro down after the 17-nation European currency earlier hit a one-week high against the dollar on expectations that a conference call of G7 finance ministers and central bankers may hasten bold action." Well, Germany got its wish: it got Spain to admit it is broke. Just as it wanted - because remember: all Germany is, is a true lender of last resort unlike the ECB: after all they are the decision makers. And Germany knows very well that it needs Europe desperate when it is forced to accept any conditions to the German DIP loan that Schrodinger Schauble proposes. Which means forget anything positive will come out of the G7, and certainly forget anything actionable will come out of the ECB's June 7 meeting. If anything, things will first get much worse, before things get better. And finally, don't forget just who benefits the most from EURUSD at parity or lower... That's right: Germany.



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A Sampling Of This Morning's Eurosis Schizophrenia

While the world patiently awaits, not even sure why because it is now absolutely guaranteed that it will be a huge disappointment, the G7 headlines which now appears to be merely an update session, and not one where any decisions will be taken, here is a sampling of this morning's schizophrenia out of Europe:

  • FINNISH FOREIGN MINISTER URGES ORDERLY GREEK DEFAULT: ZEIT
  • FINNISH FOREIGN MINISTER SAYS GREECE NEEDS 2ND DEBT DEAL: ZEIT

Yet...

  • FINLAND'S TUOMIOJA SAYS NOBODY WANTS TO OUST GREECE FROM EURO

But... he just said... Sigh. And the US trading day has not even started.



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Overnight Sentiment: More Economic DetEUROration

Another day, another set of disappointing European economic data. While the final Euroarea Composite PMI index increased by one tick from the 45.9 Flash reading to 46.0 in the final, the prior revision was also upward from 46.5 to 46.7 thereby indicating that while things had not necessarily deteriorated much in the past 2 weeks, they did relative to benchmark. Also minutes ago German April factory orders printed at -1.9 on expectations of a -1.2 decline, and coupled with the prior revision from 2.2% to 3.2%, this confirms that the peripheral shakedown in Europe is impacting the core countries, as well as non-Eurozone targets increasingly more. This was confirmed when looking at the spread of domestic vs foreign orders. Again, per Goldman: "Domestic orders rose 0.4%mom after +1.8%mom, while foreign orders declined -3.6%mom after +4.4%mom. Within foreign orders, orders from the Euro area declined 1.8%mom after +0.9%mom, continuing the downward trend. Foreign orders from outside the Euro area declined +4.7%mom after +6.6%mom, still showing an upward trend (see chart below). There is no indication in these data that activity in the German manufacturing sector saw a sharp deterioration in Q2. Business sentiment, however, suggests that the sector is likely to lose some momentum going forward." Which means that once again, everyone's attention is now focuses on what external help can come: either from the G7 phone call in minutes, which will be a disappointment, or the ECB on Thursday, which we are confident, will also be a whimper, not a bang. As a reminder: there must be blood in the streets for coordinated intervention by both banks and fiscal authorities in Europe, for it to be effective.



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And Now, Courtesy of Bridgewater... It's Italy's Turn

Earlier today, by way of a simple graphic, the world's biggest hedge fund, Bridgewater, was kind enough to remind the world just how pointless any debates about Europe's future viability are if the primary funding conduit: the EFSF/ESM hybrid can not provide the cash needed for even half the combined funding needs of Italy and Spain. Now, Bridgewater strikes at Europe once again, this time redirecting the general attention to where it is long overdue: Italy.



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Guest Post: David Versus Goliath – The SNB Against Everybody Else

A picture says more than a hundred words, so I wanted to present in graphical terms what happened at the Swiss National Bank over the last few quarters.  Central banks have tried to “manage” currencies in the past. Sooner or later, market forces win. As all other major central banks keep printing additional Euros, Dollars, Yen etc., the SNB looks prone to lose this game. A run on the Swiss Franc could lead to a further increase in prices of Swiss government bonds. Swiss equities however would decline, at least measured in Swiss Francs.



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Let's Twist Again? The Bond Market Is Hinting At A Huge Disappointment For Stocks On June 20

When it comes to the future, suddenly torn by economic uncertainty driven by a plunging stock market and a tanking economy, the talking heads and the sellside brigade have opined: more QE, preferably in the form of asset purchases. After all it was none other than Goldman earlier today who said that "our confidence that the FOMC will ease policy once more at the June 19-20 meeting has also grown... Our baseline remains that Fed officials will purchase a mixture of mortgages and long-term Treasuries, financed via balance sheet expansion... If they decide to extend their balance sheet, they could add excess bank reserves or “sterilize” the reserve impact via reverse repos and/or term deposits." In other words: not sterilized, or bye bye Chubby Checker (recall that even Goldman finally admitted two months ago that when it comes to Fed intervention, what matters is flow - as a result Twist has been largely ineffective in recreating the effect of QE1 and 2). To be sure even more respected investors like Pimco have bet the house that the NEW QE will constitute primarily of more MBS purchases. Yet the real question is what is the bond market telling us: after all when it comes to matters such as these, one should completely ignore stocks, and certainly the talking heads, and instead focus on what bonds are saying. And here is where the stock market may be headed for a great disappointment: because now that the bar has been set so far, anything less than full blown LSAP, or a merely extension of Twist, would likely send stocks plunging. Which, ironically, and completely in opposition to stocks, is what bonds are expecting...



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Guest Post: An Example Of Why This Country Is Headed In The Wrong Direction

This past Friday, Barack Obama was at a Minneapolis-area Honeywell plant touting his economic recovery credentials to cheering disciples. One of the excited faithful was a young boy, fifth-grader Tyler Sullivan, who took the day off from school to hear the President speak. The President was full of the usual bombast about how Congress needs to work with him to ‘build a strong economy’, and how he wants to get $3,000 to everyone in the American middle class so that people can go out and buy ‘thingamajigs’. Naturally, the crowd cheered. It was the typical sort of gross misunderstanding of economic prosperity that you see from politicians… and most people at this point. People these days think it’s a great idea when the government sprinkles money around the middle class, and love the idea of politicians ‘coming together’ to build a better economy. In reality, when people hear talk about politicians ‘building an economy’ they should run away like a scalded dog. Throughout history, a lot of other politicians have also tried building an economy– it’s called central planning, and it just doesn’t work.



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And Then There Were Three...

Last September we were delighted to bring you the following great news:

DAVID BIANCO NO LONGER WORKS AT BOFA, SPOKESWOMAN SAYS

Now, we are even more delighted to bring you the following breaking news:

BLACKROCK CHIEF EQUITY STRATEGIST BOB DOLL TO RETIRE

And then there were three...



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Record Number Of US Households On Foodstamps

Last month, when the USDA released the latest foodstamps numbers for the month of February, there was some hope that following a third month of declines, we may just have seen the peak of US foodstamp usage and going forward we would only see the number decline. Sadly, the latest numbers refutes this: in March a total of 46,405,204 persons were at or below poverty level and thus eligible for foodstamps, a 79K increase in the month. Yet while many individuals have learned to game the system, and this numbers at the peak may fluctuate, when it comes to the far more comprehensive and difficult to fudge "households on foodstamps" number, there was no confusion: at 22,257,647, the number of US households receiving the "SNAP treatment" rose to an all time high, even as the benefit per household dropped to the second lowest ever. At least all these impoverished believers in hope and change have FaceBook IPO profits to look forward to. Oh wait.

 



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Guest Post: The Lie That Is Social Security

federal-balance-sheet-in-2011

The problems facing the U.S. economy are daunting especially when it comes the issues of Government spending and the current deficit. We recently wrote about the dependency on Government programs which is currently making up as much as 35% of personal incomes. Social Security, Medicaid and Medicare make up the largest portions of the current spending requirements of the Federal Budget. The current administration has promised that cuts will not be made to government "entitlement" programs but is that a promise that any administration can actually keep? When it comes to Social Security the facts are rather alarming. By 2017 the Social Security Administration will pay out more in benefits than it takes in. This is not surprising given that in the 1950's there were roughly 5 workers for every retiree. Today, it is roughly half of that. With 78 Million "baby boomers" moving into retirement the demands on social security are set to spiral higher in the coming years ahead. Is it really any wonder then that with demographics heading in the wrong direction, not to mention a much slower growth economy, that the Social Security Administration has moved up its estimate that the Social Security Fund will be exhausted entirely by 2033?



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Morgan Stanley Has Lowest Close Since December 2008, Down 40% From Jim Cramer's "Dirt Cheap" Level

Little to be said here: everyone's favorite proxy of all that is broken with Europe, and now the retail investor, Margin Stanley just closed at the lowest price since December 2008. The move lower continues as Zero Hedge warned back in September of 2011. Compare this to Jim Cramer's February 2 pronouncement that Morgan Stanley is a "dirt cheap stock"... at $19.66!? The 40% prolapse in the four months since (120% annualized?) probably make it dirtest cheapest?



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Gold Wins As Financials And USD Deteriorate

With Europe's credit traders on vacation, volumes overall were muted today in Europe but average in the US. The lack of discipline that normally occurs when the credit boys leave the room helped lift sovereign credit in Europe and implicitly US equity futures (ES) into the open today, which marked the top for the day (back in the green after an ugly Sunday night) as dismal macro data dragged debt and and equity markets back down to overnight lows. Credit and equity moved in sync in general but across broad risk-assets, correlations were loose at best as Gold was very stable holding gains from Friday while Silver exhibited its high beta ebullience and Copper and Oil followed stock's path down and back up. Treasuries leaked higher in yield with a steepening in the curve (though 10Y and 30Y outperformed 7Y as the Twist pivot maturity seemed most active). EUR strength was sustained from early morning in Europe with JPY weakness providing some support for stocks but it seemed both VWAP and the 200DMA were the key levels today and despite two stop-runs in the afternoon, we flushed down at the last minute (off near day's highs - thanks to Egan-Jones' UK downgrade news) to close red for ES (2nd day in a row below 200DMA). Financials (which are close to red for the year and about to cross below Healthcare and Staples) did not participate in the swings as much with JPM and MS worst today -3% (with the latter now 25% lower than the March 2009 market trough levels) and the other TBTFs around -1.9%. VIX oscillated rather like ES today - as usual but popped back above 26% to close marginally lower on the day. While correlations did drift today, stocks remain a little too full of hope still against overall risk markets but with UK closed again tomorrow, we may have to wait for Wednesday to see how Europe (and implicitly the rest of the world) feels.



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