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Econophile's picture

Bear's execs say, "We didn't do it. It's not our fault. Evil speculators conspired against us, and investors irrationally made a run on us." They have no clue and they sound pathetic. Perhaps they should have read two little books.

madhedgefundtrader's picture

European finance ministers must be depressed that their $140 billion bailout of Greece only bought them only 24 hours of grace in the eyes of investors. The global nature of the sell off across all asset classes came as no surprise. The withdrawal of the Fed at the beginning of the quarter as the sole purchaser of real estate debt in the market, led not to a crash in bond prices, but a huge six point rally. Where am I going to buy the dip first? Shanghai.

Reggie Middleton's picture

The chances of the Euro contagion being contained are quite slim, and the Spanish government is saying it is "madness" that they will be needing a bailout. While they may not be needing a bailout now, it is far from "madness" to speculate on such matters. After all, it is the Spanish government itself that set itself up for such speculation by using pie in the sky numbers to justify their claims of having things under control. Once their projections are seen for what they really are, we shall see what "madness" truly entails...

madhedgefundtrader's picture

Regulations are going to get tougher, inspections more rigorous, and taxes higher. Raising the production cost of what is already the world’s most expensive oil. Watch out for the new $10 billion liability cap. The offshore industry’s dirty little secret. Cap & Trade, once DOA, has been reborn. The only certainty is more expensive gas at the pump.

Reggie Middleton's picture

So everybody is asking if "Greece will make it through the Pan-European Sovereign debt crisis and if not, then who's next?" Well, we have spent at least 3 man-months answering this very question, and I am finally getting around to publishing these answers in a formal report. It is the calculations behind this very same report that has allowed me to call this Pan-European Debt thing quite accurately for the last 4 or 5 months - calls that were in direct contravention to practically every quoted political leader and most Wall Street banks may I add. Let's walk through recent history...

Chris Pavese's picture

The CFA North Carolina Society recently hosted a series of meetings on Avoiding Short-Termism across the state. Jack Gray, Adjunct Professor at the Centre for Capital Market Dysfunctionality at the University of Technology in Sydney, was kind enough to allow us to share his presentation with our readers. Jack's presentation identified the sources of short-termism in addition to offering suggestions for overcoming said barriers, and exploiting long-term value creation.

Econophile's picture

While the current economic data appears rosy, it won't be sustained without credit or rising wages or job growth. Much of existing spending is from a drawdown of savings and various transitory stimulus programs. These things won't last.