Bond

America Needs A Good, Old-Fashioned Economic Depression

A good, old-fashioned, pre-1929 depression (like the short-lived, eleven-month depression in 1920-1921, before the days of “modern” central banking and “enlightened” Keynesian intervention “cures”) is the only tonic that can clear out the malinvestment built up since the beginning of the fiat money era.

End Of An Era: The Rise And Fall Of The Petrodollar System

"The chaos that one day will ensue from our 35-year experiment with worldwide fiat money will require a return to money of real value. We will know that day is approaching when oil-producing countries demand gold, or its equivalent, for their oil rather than dollars or euros. The sooner the better."

"What Has Been Will Be Again" - Today's Fantasies Are Vast & Unremitting

Simple logic seems to have been suspended for the near universal disregard of the rules of common sense in the treatment of the money supply of the world.  How long can this possibly persist?  Obviously, at some point, this fantasy will be shattered. For just because central banks have continuously increased their balance sheets in recent years without igniting runaway price inflation doesn’t mean the danger isn’t there.  Remember, correlation doesn’t imply causation.  But it can imply confusion.

Investors Plow Record Cash Into Emerging Markets, As Europe Suffers Record Outflows

Whether it is due to the recent speculation that Japan may usher in helicopter money, or ongoing concerns about what Brexit may do to the future of European asset returns, there has been a dramatic shift in fund allocation and as Bank of America reports, investors are rushing to vote with their wallets. They have done so in the latest week by continuing to plow money into EM stocks, allocating a record amount of cash to Emerging Markets, while yanking a similarly record amount of cash from Europe.

Its 2007 Deja Vu All Over Again: Goldman Is Raising $8 Billion LBO Fund

The last time Goldman raised an private-equity buyout fund was in 2007: at just over $20 billion, it was the second biggest private-equity fund ever. It also top-ticked the market. Nine years later, the WSJ reports that Goldman is finally preparing a much anticipated sequel, in the form of a corporate-buyout fund with assets between $5 and $8 billion.

US Futures Rebound Despite Global Stock Weakness As USDJPY Ramps HIgher

After breaking a multi-year stretch of 9 daily record highs in the Dow Jones, overnight global markets saw some early weakness with Asian stocks retreating after BOJ chief Kuroda dashed hopes for so-called helicopter money, triggering yen’s steepest rally in a month and pulling the Nikkei lower by 1.1%. This however did not last long, and around the European open the traditional ramp in the USDJPY helped European equities shrug off early downside, while US equity futures have already recovered half of yesterday's losses.

The 'Fed Model' For Stocks Is Just "Another 90s Gimmick To Justify The Unjustifiable"

Stocks trading on very shaky ground at already high multiples (and greater uncertainty that it will all be corrected naturally by the any-day-now thriving economy), means efforts to justify increasingly outlying earnings multiples are over-reaching... "There is just nothing to suggest interest rates are related to PE’s or EP’s, and thus the “Fed model” was but another 1990’s gimmick to justify the unjustifiable."

"Are Stocks Cheap Or Expensive" - Here Are 20 Answers

"Is the S&P 500 cheap or expensive" - In trying to answer that question, BofA does the right thing and instead of giving a blanket statement, it looks at the 20 most important valuation measures, and finds that the market is overvalued, in some cases dramatically, according to 18 of of the 20 most popular metrics.

Mattress Money & Need-For-Yield: "We Saw This In 2007"

“Cash On The Sidelines.” is the age old excuse why the current “bull market” rally is set to continue into the indefinite future. The ongoing belief is that at any moment investors are suddenly going to empty bank accounts and pour it into the markets. However, the reality is if they haven’t done it by now after 3-consecutive rounds of Q.E. in the U.S., a 200% advance in the markets, and now global Q.E., exactly what will that catalyst be? However, Clifford Asness summed up the problem with this myth the best and is worth repeating...

Mario Draghi's "Whatever-er It Takes"-Promising ECB Press Conference - Live Feed

While sovereign and corporate bond markets might suggest 'all is well', the collapse of European consumer confidence indicates "whatever it takes" has failed and while Mario Draghi kept rates unchanged and maintained his global QE buying program, we suspect the need to offer another banal bone of hope for an artificial market running on fumes will overhwhelm any rational thought left in the former Goldman banker's mind.

What To Expect In Today's ECB Announcement: "Time To Send Another Dovish Signal"

Following the previously noted fireworks from Kuroda, who in a BBC interview said that there is "no possibility" of helicopter money (which however the WSJ quickly added was based on an interview conducted in mid-June which supposedly means there is possibility now) In under an hour the market will turn its attention to the ECB's latest statement, where as SocGen's Anatoli Annenkov writes, it is "time to send another dovish signal."