Bond

Just 3 Things

Record levels denote the point that previously marked the end of a cycle, not the beginning of a new one. This point is often missed by the mainstream media. Record highs of anything, whether it is economic, fundamental or financial data, are warnings signs of late stage events.

India Assets Slide After Modi Launches "Surgical Strikes" In Kashmir, Killing Two Pakistani Soldiers

India conducted "surgical strikes" on suspected terrorist camps just across the border in Pakistan, marking its first direct military response to an attack on an army base it blames on Pakistan. The military offensive was the worst since 1999, when then-Prime Minister Atal Bihari Vajpayee - also a member of Modi’s nationalist Bharatiya Janata Party - responded to what he said was repeated cross-border infiltrations by militants in Kashmir.

Crude Declines As OPEC Deal Doubts Emerge; Futures Roll Over

After oil soared over 5% yesterday, its biggest jump since April, overnight skepticism and doubts have emerged about the viability and compliance with the deal, coupled with a boost in production by non-OPEC producers, and as a result WTI has dipped back under $47, down 0.5%, suggesting that the OPEC surge may be short-lived, and modestly pressuring US equity futures.

No Need For Yield Curve Inversion (There Is Already Much Worse Indicated)

The bond market selloff of the past month or so, which has apparently fizzled just as Alan Greenspan was assuring the world it was only getting started (once more preserving for posterity how little he knows about bonds, interest rates, and money, as if knowing anything about any of those would be useful to a central banker). There is no bond market riddle. As each curve gets squashed by righteous pessimism, they together indicate nothing good about the near-term future.

The Banquet Of Consequences Is Being Served (By The Central Banking Cartel)

Last week, the Federal Reserve decided to keep US interest rates unchanged, marking its 96th month of life at the zero bound. Apparently, for all of its "data dependence", the Fed feels the economy could still benefit from *just* a little more of its ZIRP happy juice. But as anyone with a little common sense will tell you, More is not always better. It's quite possible to have too much of a good thing. And in its pursuit to kick the can for a little longer, the Fed has crossed a dangerous line.

Treasury Sells 7Y Paper In Another Mediocre, Tailing Auction; Bond Market Yawns

When the results for the sale of $28bn in 7 paper printed, the result was a modest tail, with a high yield of 1.389% tailing the 1.385% When Issued. As a reminder, last month's 7Y auction had an even bigger tail but that was due to concerns of a potential rate hike by the Fed in September; this time there was no such concern.

Saudi Devaluation Bets Surge, Stocks Crash As Debt Deal Falters On 9/11 Legislation Anxiety

Despite its peg, Spot Riyal is trading at its weakest in 8 months as turmoil mounts in The Kingdom as a failed 'deal' in Algiers, pay cuts for royalty, and now growing concerns that the US vote/veto on 9/11 Legislation will delay Saudi Arabia's first international bond sale. Forward bets on Saudi currency devaluation are surging and default risk is on the rise again as Bloomberg reports, a Senate vote to override President Barack Obama’s veto could cause some investors to balk at the issue.

Futures Fail To Rebound As Deutsche Bank Tries To Comfort Markets That It Is "Fine"

After yesterday's "Hillary rally" in the US, the overnight's session has seen more risk-on sentiment as European stocks advanced, ignoring weakness in Asia as investors followed every twist of shares of beleaguered lender Deutsche Bank, whose CEO last night assured Bill readers that the bank is not seeking a bailout, which however was contradicted by a Zeit article this morning reporting that Germany may seek as much as s 25% "bailout" stake in a worst case scenario.