Bond

Tyler Durden's picture

Who Will Suffer From A Leveraged Credit Shakeout?





Marty Fridson, CIO at Lehmann Livian Fridson Advisors, has been a leading figure in the high-yield bond market since it was known as the "junk bond" market — and he sees as much as $1.6 trillion in high-yield defaults coming in a surge he expects to begin soon... “And this is not based on an apocalyptic forecast,” he warns.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

The BoJ Jumps The Monetary Shark - Now The Machines, Madmen And Morons Are Raging





“Kuroda loves a surprise - Kuroda doesn’t care about common sense, all he cares about is meeting the price target,” Folks, look-out below.  As George W. Bush said in another context... this sucker is going down!

 
GoldCore's picture

Gold Falls, Stocks Record Highs as Japan Goes ‘Weimar’, “Here Be Dragons”





Stocks globally surged, while gold fell sharply today despite renewed irrational exuberance on hopes that the Bank of Japan’s vastly increasing money printing will fill some of the gaps left by the apparent end of Federal Reserve bond buying. 

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Charting Banzainomics: What The BOJ's Shocking Announcement Really Means





Still confused what the BOJ's shocking move was about, aside from pushing the US stock market to a new record high of course? This should explains it all: as the chart below show, as a result of the BOJ's stated intention to buy 8 trillion to 12 trillion yen ($108 billion) of Japanese government bonds per month it means the BOJ will now soak up all of the 10 trillion yen in new bonds that the Ministry of Finance sells in the market each month. In other words. The Bank of Japan’s expansion of record stimulus today may see it buy every new bond the government issues. In other words: full monetization.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Goldman On BOJ's Banzainomics: "We Highlight The Potential For Harsh Criticism Of Further Cost-Push Inflation"





It was about several months ago when Goldman, which initially was an enthusiastic supporter of BOJ's QE, turned sour on both Abenomics and the J-Curve (perhaps after relentless mocking on these pages), changed its tune, saying an unhappy ending for Abenomics is almost certainly in the cards. Not surprisingly then, in its post-mortem of the BOJ's overnight action, already being affectionately called Banzainomics, is hardly glowing, and is summarized as follows: "We maintain our view that unless the yen continues to depreciate significantly, as a result of the latest QQE action, the BOJ is unlikely to meet its scenario for inflation to stably reach 2% during FY2015. From a political perspective, with nationwide local elections looming in April 2015, we also highlight the potential for harsh criticism of further cost-push inflation driven by the weaker yen among nonmanufacturers, SMEs, and households. Irrespective of the latest easing moves, we believe the BOJ is treading a very narrow path."

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Shocking Bank Of Japan Trick And QE Boosting Treat Sends Futures To Record High





Two days ago, when QE ended and knowing that the market is vastly overstimating the likelihood of a full-blown ECB public debt QE, we tweeted the following: "It's all up to the BOJ now." Little did we know how right we would be just 48 hours later. Because as previously reported, the reason why this morning futures are about to surpass record highs is because while the rest of the world was sleeping, the BOJ shocked the world with a decision to boost QE, announcing it would monetize JPY80 trillion in JGBs, up from the JPY60-70 trillion currently and expand the universe of eligible for monetization securities. A decision which will forever be known in FX folklore as the great Halloween Yen-long massacre.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Markets Explode Higher As Bank Of Japan Goes All-In-er; Increases QE To JPY 80 Trillion





UPDATE: Nikkei 225 +1100 points,  USDJPY +3 handles to 111.00 post-FOMC,

In a surprise move given all the recent congratulatory bullshit from Abe and Kuroda on breaking the back of Japan's deflation and bring about recovery (forgetting to mention record high misery index, surging bankruptcies and a crushed consumer), the Bank of Japan (by a 5-4 vote) raised its bond-buying program from JPY 70 trillion to 80 trillion... and triple its ETF buying to JPY 3 trillion. This move, on the heels of more confirmation of broader foreign asset purchases in Japan's GPIF sent USDJPY instantly gapping 1 big figure higher to 110.30 and Nikkei futures instantly rose 400 points. S&P futures are also surging. Gold and silver are tanking and TSY bonds are selling off.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Goldman, Morgan Stanley Warn European QE, While Fully Priced In, Is Neither Imminent Nor Likely





On balance, Morgan Stanley feels that broad-based QE, (i.e. large-scale purchases of government bonds) is further away for the ECB than the market currently believes. Presently they only assign a subjective 40% probability to such a step being taken; whereas the euro rates market is already pricing in the ECB resorting to a broad-based purchase programme with a very high probability of 80-100%. Goldman agrees warning specifically that "Sovereign QE is not imminent... and indeed may never happen." It appears no matter what, disappointment is guaranteed for the market.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

The Dollar Decline Continues: China Starts Direct Convertibility With Asia's #1 Financial Hub





Earlier this week some of the biggest financial news of the year made huge waves all over Asia. Yet in the Western press, this hugely important information has barely even been mentioned. So what’s the news? The Chinese government announced that the renminbi will become directly convertible with the Singapore dollar... effective immediately.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

3 Things Worth Thinking About





The question that remains to be answered is whether the economy and the financial markets are strong enough to stand on their own this time? The last two times that QE has ended the economy slid towards negative growth and the markets suffered rather severe correction...

 
GoldCore's picture

"Gold Is A Good Place To Put Money These Days" - Greenspan





Greenspan told the CFR that "gold is a good place to put money these days given it's value as a currency outside of the policies conducted by governments." "Gold has always been accepted without reference to any other guarantee." When asked where the price of gold was headed in the next five years he said “higher --- measurably" ...

 

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Sudden Bout Of Risk-Offness Sends European Shares Sharply Lower, US Futures Not Happy





To summarize (even though with liquidity as non-existant as it is, this may be completely stale by the time we go to print in a minute or so), European shares erase gains, fall close to intraday lows following the Fed’s decision to end QE. Banks, basic resources sectors underperform, while health care, tech outperform. Companies including Shell, Barclays, Aviva, Volkswagen, Alcatel-Lucent, ASMI, Bayer released earnings. German unemployment unexpectedly declines. The Italian and U.K. markets are the worst-performing larger bourses, the Swiss the best. The euro is weaker against the dollar. Greek 10yr bond yields rise; German yields decline. Commodities decline, with nickel, silver underperforming and wheat outperforming. U.S. jobless claims, GDP, personal consumption, core PCE due later.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Alan Greenspan: QE Failed To Help The Economy, The Unwind Will Be Painful, "Buy Gold"





"Gold is a good place to put money these days given its value as a currency outside of the policies conducted by governments." ... "I don’t think it’s possible" for the Fed to end its easy-money policies in a trouble-free manner. ... "Effective demand is dead in the water" and the effort to boost it via bond buying "has not worked.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Every Bond Bear's Worst Nightmare In 1 Simple Chart





"Everyone" knows that yields have to rise when the Fed tightens, right? With yields so low, "everyone" knows that bonds are the worst investment if The Fed begins to hike rates, right? Wrong! As the following chart from Goldman Sachs shows - over the last 32 rate-hike cycles, 10Y bond yields have compressed after the rate-hike cycle begins... So be careful what you wish for on Fed tightening!

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Hilsenrath Warns: Fed's "Vote Of Confidence In US Economy" Means Mid-2015 Rate Hike Possibility





Pointing to “solid job gains” and a falling unemployment rate, the Fed said a range of labor market indicators suggest that labor market slack is “gradually diminishing.” In the process it struck from the statement an earlier assessment that labor market slack was substantial, a phrase investors have been watching closely for signs the Fed is becoming more confident about the economy. If all goes as they plan, officials will turn their attention in the months ahead to discussions about when to start raising short-term interest rates and how to signal those moves to the public before they happen. Many expect to move on rates by the middle of 2015.

 
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