Bond

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China's Solution To “Property Companies Facing Huge Debt Burdens”: Much More Debt





“Property companies are facing huge debt burdens,” said Sun Binbin, a bond analyst at China Merchants Securities Co. in Shanghai. “If the regulator hadn’t eased, there probably would have been more defaults.” Or, translated: if the companies weren't allowed to "fix" their huge debt burdens with even more debt, it would have been a complete catastrophe.

 
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Argentina Bonds/Currency Tumble As Delegation Snubs Mediation





With 2 days until the 30-day grace period for 'negotiating' the already defaulted upon bonds is over and Argentina is once again dumped from the public markets, the demands for a "continuous mediation" by Judge Griesa appears to have fallen on dear ears. Bloomberg reports that the Argentina delegation will not meet with the mediator today.. and Argentina bonds are tumbling (and CDS soaring). Markets are implying around 45-50% chance of a default being triggered, which, as Jefferies noted last week, seems low. Argentina's black-market peso (blue dollar rate) weakened to 12.75 (just shy of its weakest ever at 13.00) implying a 50% devaluation over the peso.

 
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Spanish Bond Yields Tumble Below 2.5% - Lowest In History





European peripheral bond yields have compressed from "whatever it takes" highs to "whatever..." lows in the last two years as no amount of factual representation of the dismal reality of Europe's non-recovery can affect the centrally-planned virtuous cycle of ECB carry-trade funded idiocy occurring in the bond markets. Theoretically, Draghi's removal of the credit risk/convertibility premium has left these bonds to trade on growth/inflation expectations alone... and at record lows, they don't seem too hopeful. While Spain 10Y dropped below 2.5% (and we could list 20 fundamental factors that flash red), we thought it ironic that as Italy's 10Y drops below 2.7% for the first time in history it is delinquent on $100 billion in services rendered to its private businesses.

 
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Frontrunning: July 28





  • The market in one sentence: Buying on Dips Pays Most in Five Years as Stocks Rebound (BBG)
  • Europe subdued, Russia shares tumble on new sanctions (Reuters)
  • Chinese Data Don’t Add Up (WSJ)
  • Argentine Default Drama Nears Critical Stage (WSJ)
  • Global Pressure Mounts on Israel to End Gaza Fighting (BBG)
  • Ukraine troops advance as experts renew attempt to reach crash site (Reuters)
  • Prospects Brighten for Republicans to Reclaim a Senate Majority (WSJ)
  • Europe’s banking union faces legal challenge in Germany (FT)
  • Investors Bet on China's Large Property Developers (WSJ)
  • Hague court orders Russia to pay over $50 billion in Yukos case (Reuters)
 
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US Equities Flat While China Surges On More Stimulus And Bailout Hopes





There has been little in term of tier 1 data releases to drive the price action so far in the overnight session which means participants focused on the upcoming US related risk events including the Fed, Q2 GDP and July Payrolls. This, combined with WSJ article by Fed’s Fisher who opined that the FOMC should consider tapering the reinvestment of maturing securities and begin shrinking the Fed’s balance sheet (note that Fisher’s opinion piece is written based on a speech he gave on July 16th) meant that USTs came under pressure overnight in Asia and in Europe this morning. There has been little notable equity futures action (for now: the USDJPY algo team gave it a good ramp attempt just before Europe open, and will repeat just around the US open despite Standard Chartered major cut to its USDJPY forecast from 110 to 106 overnight), although we expect that to change since today is the day when Tuesday frontrunning takes place with full force. We expect equities to completely ignore the ongoing deterioration in Ukraine and the imminent release of EU's own sanctions against Russia, as well as what is now shaping up as an Argentina default on July 30.

 
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The Italian Government Owes Over $100 Billion To Private Suppliers





Much has been said in the popular press about Italy's surprising economic recovery (which based on recent data is starting to lose steam), as well as its much improved fiscal picture (even if the country's public debt hits record highs quarter after quarter and the bad debt within its banking system just rose by 24% from the prior year, to €169 billion the highest since 1998). Little has been said about just how Italy managed to pull this economic miracle off. The answer: robbing private suppliers to pay Paul, or rather, the public sector. According to Reuters, the Italian state owes some 75 billion euros ($102 billion)to private suppliers, as reported by the Bank of Italy. The unpaid bills have starved companies of cash and triggered layoffs, factory closures and bankruptcies.

 
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"It Can't Be A Bubble!"





If one wants to identify bubbles, one must perforce study monetary conditions. The comparison of historical data on valuations and other ancillary factors can only take one so far. The problem is that in times of strongly inflationary policy, the economy's price structure becomes thoroughly distorted, and that therefore a great many “data” can no longer be regarded as reliable... Most of the time, it's the eventual slowdown of money supply growth that brings a bubble to its knees.

 
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Indexation Is A Socialist Way Of Allocating Capital





"In effect, by pursuing indexation we have introduced a socialist way of allocating capital in the heart of the capitalist system... As we all know, socialism is the ultimate form of freeloading. It has never worked, and it never will. This indexation is one of the most obvious forms of parasitism we have ever encountered."

 
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Two Weeks After Upgrading Stocks, Goldman Downgrades Stocks





Yesterday, in what was probably a case of moronic drivel penner's remorse, the same firm which just upgraded its S&P price target by 150 points two weeks ago, decided to... downgrade stocks. But only kinda, sorta and only for the next 3 months: Kostin is unwilling to go so far as to tell the whole truth so while he did downgrade stocks to Neutral through October, he is still Overweight equities over the next 12 months. In other words, sell in July but don't go away, and keep on buying over the next 12 months, or something. To wit: "We downgrade to neutral over 3 months as a sell-off in bonds could lead to a temporary sell-off in equities. This makes the near-term risk/ reward less attractive despite our strong conviction that equities are the best positioned asset class over 12 months, where we remain overweight."

 
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De-Dollarization Spreads: Swiss & Chinese Central Banks Enter Swap Agreement





The trend of the end of the dollar hegemony continues to slowly creep through the world's financial systems (no matter how many mainstream media 'king dollar' stories we see). The Swiss National Bank and the People’s Bank of China reached a currency swap agreement this week. While this is not a huge trend changer in the near-term, it demonstrates the continued rising roled of China as the largest economy and to be the next financial capital of the world when Europe and the USA blow themselves apart with defaulting socialism.

 
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Please Don't Blame The Fed: Alan Greenspan Says "Bubbles Are A Function Of Human Nature"





After all this time Greenspan still insists on blaming the people for the economic and financial havoc that he engendered from his perch in the Eccles Building. Indeed, posturing himself as some kind of latter day monetary Calvinist, he made it crystal clear in yesterday’s interview that the blame cannot be placed at his feet where it belongs:

"I have come to the conclusion that bubbles, as I noted, are a function of human nature."

C’mon.

 
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High Yield Credit Market Flashing Red As Outflows Surge





As we have been highlighting for a few weeks, something is rotten in high-yield credit markets. This week, the mainstream media is starting to catch on as major divergences in performance (high-yield bond spreads are 30-40bps off their cycle tights from just prior to MH17 even as stocks rally to new record highs) and technicals weaken. However, as BofA warns, flows follow returns and this week saw the biggest outflows from high-yield funds in more than a year. Investment grade bonds saw notable inflows as investors chose up-in-quality, rather than reach-for-yield, for the first time in years... equity investors, pay attention.

 
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Frontrunning: July 25





  • Argentine holdout NML says government "choosing" to default (Reuters)
  • Crunch time for Gaza truce talks as death toll passes 800 (Reuters)
  • Don’t Tell Anybody About This Story on HFT Power Jump Trading (BBG)
  • U.S. Accuses Russia of Shelling Eastern Ukraine (BBG)
  • France’s Wheat Exports in Question as Rain Spoils Quality (BBG)
  • Tapering in action: Lower printer sales hurt Xerox's revenue (Reuters)
  • No liquidity? No Problem, there's an ETF for that: Bond ETFs Swelling in Europe as Trading Debt Gets Tougher (BBG)
  • Herbalife hires ex-Biden chief to fend off regulators (NYPost)
  • GM recalls far from calamity for some dealers who find new customers, business (Reuters)
  • Bad weather likely cause of fatal Air Algerie crash: French officials (Reuters)
 
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