• GoldCore
    07/01/2015 - 10:07
    With all eyes on Greece it would seem another crisis relating to unpayable debt is brewing in the Caribbean. The governor of Puerto Rico, Alejandro García Padilla, has warned that the island is...

Bond

GoldCore's picture

Chinese Stock Market Collapses 7.4% - Gold Demand Surges To Record





Shanghai Gold Exchange volume climbed to a record today as prices declined incentivizing value driven Chinese buyers as Chinese stocks crashed 7.4%. Chinese stocks have had the biggest two-week loss in more than 18 years and are close to entering a bear market after extending losses from their June 12 peak to 19 percent in less than three weeks.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

China Plunges Most Since 2007, Points Away From Bear Market; Greek Drama Continues





Following yesterday's furious market drop in Chinese stocks, just before the overnight open, Morgan Stanley came out with a much distributed report urging investors "Not to buy this dip", and so they didn't. As a result, the Shanghai Composite imploded, at one point trading down 8% while the Chinext and Shenzhen markets crashed even more. This was the single biggest Shanghai Composite one-day drop since 2007, and with a close at 4192.87 the SHCOMP is now on the verge of a bear market, down 19% from its June 12 highs. China's second largest market, Shenzhen, is now officially in a bear market.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

3 Things: Trend, Ceiling & Rates





With levels of investors complacency at extremely high levels, it is a currently "fact" that little can go wrong. There is no recession in sight; the earnings decline was all primarily related to energy companies and most importantly, global Central Banks are continuing to support the financial markets. Of course, maybe it is the last point that should be questioned. If the economy is doing so well, then why are Central Banks still needing to intervene to support the growth? This is equivalent of saying the "the patient is cured, as long as we don't take him off of life support."

 
Tyler Durden's picture

These Three Events Will Shatter "Liquidity Illusion", Trigger Crisis, OECD Says





“Any of these events would likely trigger asset price volatility [and] attempts by institutional investors to redeem illiquid corporate bonds in crisis circumstances would amplify volatility.”

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Frontrunning: June 25





  • This headline needs updating: Creditors set bailout ultimatum for defiant Greeks (Reuters)
  • Greece’s Fragile Banks Leave Alexis Tsipras Few Options in Bailout Talks (WSJ)
  • Dueling Greece Plans Presented as Ministers Race for Aid Deal (BBG)
  • Icahn Cashes In His Netflix Chips (WSJ)
  • Meet the Health-Law Holdouts: Americans Who Prefer to Go Uninsured (WSJ)
  • ECB holds Athens lifeline unchanged as Bundesbank protests (Reuters)
  • Supreme Court Guide: Six Big Decisions Remain (WSJ)
  • The Rise of the Compliance Guru—and Banker Ire (BBG)
 
Tyler Durden's picture

Auto Loans In "Untested" Territory Blackstone Warns As Subprime ABS Sales Accelerate





"Of the subprime vehicle loans bundled into securities, 73 percent now exceed five years, up from 64 percent during the first three months of 2014. 'Because cars depreciate quickly, a borrower is typically upside down or underwater toward the end of a long loan term.' 'The risk is that you extend a loan that a borrower cannot afford over its term schedule. Inching out to 75 and 84 months, I don’t think that has been tested yet.'"

 
Tyler Durden's picture

"When The Unwind Comes, It Comes Sharply As The Exit Door Is Tiny"





“There are three things that matter in the bond market these days: liquidity, liquidity and liquidity. When the unwind comes, like we’ve seen in the past few months, it comes abruptly and sharply as the exit door is tiny"...

 
GoldCore's picture

“Being Fed Garbage” and "Complacency Rules… for Now”





- We need a free market in currencies, not bail-ins and a war on cash and gold - People blindly trust “experts” so welcome that some of them giving prudent advice regarding diversification - Currencies of creditor nations – Norway, Switzerland, Singapore, Hong Kong will outperform in long term

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Buy Programs Stumble After Greek Deal Proposal Goes Back To Drawing Board In Last Minute





And it started off all so well: the market, blissfully ignoring what we wrote just yesterday in Why The IMF Will Reject The Latest Greek Proposal In Just Two Numbers, was in full blown levitation mode overnight when it sent Japanese stocks to their highest close since 1996 (pre dot com) and with the Chinese central bank doing its best to keep levitating local stocks away from the abyss, pushing the SHCOMP up another 2.5%. Euro Stoxx 50 went from flat to down 1% and is bouncing. As BBG's Richard Breslow adds, predictably, the market is taking this as a ploy, not an end game. Of course, this is precisely the "Bear Stearns is fine" conventional wisdom that Cramer was spewing days before Bear failed because nobody could fathom how anyone can conceive of a worst case scenario. Only it isn't nobody: we reported before of a Goldman's "Conspiracy Theory" Stunner: A Greek Default Is Precisely What The ECB Wants. 

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Confusion Reigns At PBoC As Multi-Trillion Yuan Bailout Threatens To Undermine Rate Cuts





While China is rather proud of the fact that it hasn't yet implemented outright QE, Beijing has now put in place a bewildering hodge-podge of hastily construed easing measures that can't seem to get out of their own way.

 
Phoenix Capital Research's picture

The Fed's Policies Have Paved the Way For an Even Bigger Crisis Than 2008





The 2008 Crisis was a stock and investment bank crisis. But it was not THE Crisis.

 
 
Tyler Durden's picture

"The End Of The Road" - Debt-Funded Buyback Boosts Are Finite





The problem for investors is that inorganic measures to boost profitability, like cost-cutting, wage suppression, layoffs, and stock buybacks, are finite in nature. Eventually, these options are exhausted. There are only so many employees that can be terminated, wages can only be suppressed for so long, and there is a finite number of shares that can ultimately be repurchased from shareholders. The question that investors need to be asking is what happens when companies inevitabilty reach "the end of road." Importantly, with the Fed determined to begin hiking interest rates, despite weak economic data, the end may be nearer than most are currently expecting.

 
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