• Pivotfarm
    04/17/2014 - 17:08
    You know when you want to read that last page of the book just before you fall off into the Land of Nod and the Sandman comes and sandbags you to fall asleep?

Bond

Tyler Durden's picture

Gary Shilling: China's Problems Are The World's Problems





In an excellent interview with STA Wealth's Lance Roberts, A. Gary Shilling dives into a number of issues. From four more years of deleveraging to go to five potential major shocks that will force "an agonizing reappraisal and switch to "risk off" strategies" for most long-only equity investors, Shilling is cautious; but his biggest fear is China (for these 8 reasons)...

 


Asia Confidential's picture

Is Inflation Next?





Market consensus is that deflation remains the greatest threat to the global economy. But that's ignoring signs of impending inflation, particularly in the US.

 


Tyler Durden's picture

All The Presidents' Bankers: The Hidden Alliances That Drive American Power





"The global financial landscape was evolving. Ever since World War II, US bankers hadn’t worried too much about their supremacy being challenged by other international banks, which were still playing catch-up in terms of deposits, loans, and global customers. But by now the international banks had moved beyond postwar reconstructive pain and gained significant ground by trading with Cold War enemies of the United States. They were, in short, cutting into the global market that the US bankers had dominated by extending themselves into areas in which the US bankers were absent for US policy reasons. There was no such thing as “enough” of a market share in this game. As a result, US bankers had to take a longer, harder look at the “shackles” hampering their growth. To remain globally competitive, among other things, bankers sought to shatter post-Depression legislative barriers like Glass-Steagall. They wielded fear coated in shades of nationalism as a weapon: if US bankers became less competitive, then by extension the United States would become less powerful. The competition argument would remain dominant on Wall Street and in Washington for nearly three decades, until the separation of speculative and commercial banking that had been invoked by the Glass-Steagall Act would be no more."

 


Tyler Durden's picture

How Much Bad Debt Can China Absorb?





China is coming under close scrutiny these days, as the leadership scurries to find new sources of economic growth and control its debt. Some analysts have reassured China watchers that the Chinese government can simply write off its bad debt, at least within the major banks, and pass it on to the asset management companies that handle that resale of distressed debt (or have it later purchased by the Ministry of Finance). Others have warned that some of the debt is serious, such as that incurred by local government financing vehicles, and are dubious about the sustainability of these entities. To worry or unwind? How much debt can China really absorb?

 


Tyler Durden's picture

Guest Post: The Screaming Fundamentals For Owning Gold





The reasons to hold gold (and silver), and we mean physical bullion, are pretty straightforward. So let’s begin with the primary ones:

  1. To protect against monetary recklessness
  2. As insulation against fiscal foolishness
  3. As insurance against the possibility of a major calamity in the banking/financial system
  4. For the embedded 'option value' that will pay out handsomely if gold is re-monetized

The punch line is this: Gold (and silver) is not in bubble territory, and its largest gains remain yet to be realized; especially if current monetary, fiscal, and fundamental supply-and-demand trends remain in play.

 


Tyler Durden's picture

Momos Mauled: Nasdaq Crashes Most Since 2011, Stocks Tumble From Record High





The jobs number expectation had been falling for a few days into the print this morning and despite the desperate efforts of every status-quo-hugging TV talking-head's Goldilocks scenario, it was not a good report - it missed low expectations and it seems the market is realizing (having been told the bar is very high for an un-taper) that the Fed will not rescue it any time soon. GDP expectations are also tumbling and thus the hope-driven hyper-growth stocks have been monkey-hammered. This is the worst swing for the Nasdaq since Dec 2011 (with Russell, Dow, and Nasdaq -1% YTD). Momos and Biotechs were blamed but this was broad-based selling as JPY carry was unwound in a hurry. Gold rallied above $1300 (+8.1% YTD) as bond yield ripped lower for 5Y's biggest daily drop in 10 weeks (short-end -4bps on the week). VIX pushed back above 14 (but it was clear derisking exposure - as opposed to hedging positions - was the order of the day).

 


Tyler Durden's picture

ECB "Models" €1 Trillion QE





Update: in direct flashback from the summer of 2011 when the ECB leaked news only to retract it within minutes, this just happened: CONSTANCIO: DOESN'T KNOW ABOUT 1 TLN-EURO QE MODEL REPORT

When in desperate need to crush your currency (being bought hand over fist by the Chinese), so urgently need to boost German exports, since you are unable to actually do QE as per your charter, what do you do if you are Mario Draghi? Well, you leak, leak, leak that you are contemplating QE, and then you leak some more. Such as today.

  • ECB HAS MODELED BOND PURCHASES UP TO 1 TLN EUROS, FAZ SAYS
  • ECB TESTS SHOW INFLATION COULD BE BOOSTED 0.2% TO 0.8%: FAZ

Like US inflation soared on the $1 trillion QEternity? Can't wait. In other news, expect zero reaction from gold on this latest news that another $1.4 trillion in fiat is about to flood the market. If only inbetween Mario Draghi's jaw bones.

 


Tyler Durden's picture

Italian Bond Yields Tumble To Record Low As Spain Drops Below Treasuries





Presented with little comment aside to ask, WTF?

 


Tyler Durden's picture

Stocks, Bonds, And Gold Surge On Dismal Jobs Data Miss





Bad news is the best news this morning. A higher unemployment rate and worse than expected job creation is the new mother's milk for stocks which kneejerked instantly to new record highs. Bond yields are tumbling and gold is surging (back over $1300) as 'investors' believe this will signal an un-taper (because QE did so much good for so long) or lower-for-longer chatter (so more buybacks?). The USD is fading fast also.

 


Tyler Durden's picture

Previewing Today's Nonfarm Payrolls Number And Key Market Levels





  • HSBC 181K
  • JP Morgan 200K
  • Goldman Sachs 200K
  • Barclays 225K
  • Bank of America 230K
  • Citigroup 240K
  • UBS 250K
  • Deutsche Bank 275K
 


Tyler Durden's picture

Frontrunning: April 4





  • Nato chief defends eastern advance (FT)
  • Russia looks east as it seeks to rebalance trade interests (FT)
  • Plane from Guinea briefly quarantined in Paris after Ebola scare (AFP)
  • US attacks Japan’s stance on Trans-Pacific Partnership (FT)
  • Thank you IMF: Ukraine PM says will stick to austerity despite Moscow pressure (Reuters)
  • U.S. Army seeks motive for Fort Hood shooting rampage (Reuters)
  • China Slowdown Adds to Emerging-Market Growth Hurdles, IMF Says (BBG)
  • Top investors press Allianz to step up oversight of Pimco (Reuters)
  • U.S. to Evaluate Role in Mideast Peace Process, John Kerry Says (WSJ)
  • Scientists dismiss claims that Yellowstone volcano about to erupt (Reuters)
  • Ukraine detains 12 riot police on suspicion of 'mass murder' (Reuters) - on CIA orders?
 


Tyler Durden's picture

Equity Futures Levitate In Anticipation Ahead Of "Spring Renaissance" Payrolls





Today’s nonfarm payrolls release is expected to show a "spring" renaissance of labor market activity that was weighed on by "adverse weather" during the winter months (Exp. 200K, range low 150K - high 275K, Prev. 175K). Markets have been fairly lackluster overnight ahead of non-farm payrolls with volumes generally on the low side. The USD and USTs are fairly steady and there are some subdued moves the Nikkei (-0.1%) and HSCEI (+0.1%). S&P500 futures are up modestly, just over 0.1%, courtesy of the traditional overnight, low volume levitation. In China, the banking regulator is reported to have issued a guideline in March to commercial banks, requiring them to better manage outstanding non-performing loans this year. Peripheral EU bonds continued to benefit from dovish ECB threats at the expense of core EU paper, with Bunds under pressure since the open, while stocks in Europe advanced on prospect of more easing (Eurostoxx 50 +0.14%). And in a confirmation how broken centrally-planned markets are, Italian 2 Year bonds high a record low yield, while Spanish 5 Year bonds yield dropped below US for the first time since 2007... or the last time the credit risk was priced to perfection.

 


Tyler Durden's picture

"Bazooka Theory" And Why The Authorities Won't Pull The Trigger





The most common pushback from any China bull, industrial commodity bull, US equity market bull, or in fact any risk market in general "bull" is "won't the authorities just pull the trigger? Won't they just stimulate?" As UBS Commodities group notes, the debate is most advanced for China and for industrial commodities, where the weakness in the economy, and the sharp commodity price falls of recent weeks, has consensus looking for a stimulus driven bounce. UBS does not think so - the authorities in China and the US have become increasingly focused on structural issues - which, simply put, means they are less willing to act than before. It appears last night's mini (railway-focused) stimulus supports the expectations of no "bazooka".

 


Syndicate content
Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!