Bond

Recovery Rates In E&P Bankruptcies Hit "Catastrophic" Levels: Moody's

Moody's has caught up to what readers of Zero Hedge knew half a year ago. According to the rating agency, creditors of energy exploration and production companies that went bankrupt last year recouped less than half the usual amount for their claims, and 2016 is shaping up just as bad. Moody's even went so far as to even use the "C" word: "Recovery rates for 15 U.S. E&P bankruptcies averaged a “catastrophic” 21 percent last year, well below the historical average of 59 percent."  

8 Reasons Why One Hedge Fund Is Keeping A Long VIX Position On

At least according to one advisor, GS Banque's Loic Schmid, it is prudent to keep some volatility protection on after the recent risk-off episode. As a reminder, in mid-July Schmid suggested buying the VIX, a trade that has been profitable ahead of the Friday surge and while he says that he is taking profits on half the position, he is also keeping the other half on for the following reasons.

Diversify At Your Own Risk

If one is to hedge with Treasury securities, they must also consider what happens if yields do not decline during a market correction. What if “safe-haven” securities traditionally used for hedging purposes were to lose 5% to 10% or even 20% or more?

Here Is The Catalyst That Could Unleash A "Violent Rally In Risk" Today

After years of seeing the Fed operate within this “reflexivity conundrum. the markets have already spoken (meaning already financially tightened enough) to a point where the Fed ONCE AGAIN has to back away from their “hiking threat.”  Back to “none and done,” which will likely merit a pretty violent rally in risk and reversal in rates."

GoldCore's picture

Gold consolidated after the gains of last week when gold rose 0.25% from $1324/oz to $1328.80/oz. Indeed, it was gold’s second consecutive weekly higher close which is bullish from a technical perspective. Markets being sentiment and momentum driven this could mean the recent correction is over as technical driven traders are likely to take signal from this and go long gold.

"Friday 'Shock' Larger Than Brexit For Quants": BofA Expects $52 Billion In Near-Term Selling Pressure

"Multi-asset vol controlled portfolios that use a systematic approach similar to our models may be subject to $12bn in global equity selling pressure in the coming days ahead. Likewise, we estimate about $40bn in global equity selling pressure via CTAs in the near term. Between the two, we could see ~$52bn in near-term selling pressure, half of which may be  through US markets."

"Global Market Rout" - Bond Selloff Snowballs Into Stock Liquidations On "Stimulus Pullback" Fears

With traders in the US arriving at their desks, the global selling appears to be accelerating and as Bloomberg notes, "a selloff in fixed income is starting to snowball into a global market rout" driven by what Reuters dubbed "growing concerns that global central banks' commitment to the post-crisis orthodoxy of super-low interest rates and asset purchase programs may be waning."

Is A VaR Shock Just Starting: Here Is The Checklist

It appears we have a disagreement between two JPMorgan analysts: while one, namely head quant Marco Kolanovic anticipates a significant deleveraging by quant and algo funds, JPM's fund flow guru is desperate to talk down the threat from a coordinated global selloff, and concludes that a VaR shock may not be imminent after all.

Time To Get Real, Part 2: "We Need Their Drugs"

On the current path, the world is experiencing the largest artificial asset allocation in modern history, one that is driven by a misguided interest rate regime that has lost its efficacy and is producing more harm than good. Yet the fear of withdrawal pain is keeping central bankers from doing the inevitable: Quit. The response is predictable: "I need the drugs!"