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Final Q2 GDP Revision Confirms 3rd Negative GDP Quarter Of The "Recovery", Inventory Build Up Flashing Red

Just as consensus had expected, after printing at -0.7% in the first revision to Q1 GDP, the final revised GDP print for the March 31-ended quarter came in at -0.2%, confirming the third negative GDP quarter in one recovery cycle since 2011 (all of which have come in the first quarter of the year as global winter cooling fans will have you know)- the first time this has happened since the 1950s.

Tsipras Faces Party Revolt In Bid To Push Debt Deal Through Parliament

With an agreement in principle on the table, Greek PM Alexis Tsipras now turns his weary eyes towards Syriza party hardliners whose support he will need in order to pass the new deal through parliament. Should the political stalemate prove intractable, Greece may need to call a referendum or snap elections.

Frontrunning: June 22

  • Mood brightens after latest Greek offer to creditors (Reuters)
  • ECB's Nowotny - Greek banks have funding extension for today (Reuters)
  • Any Greece deal must match party manifesto, minister says (Reuters)
  • Greece says now up to lenders to move on an agreement (Reuters)
  • Greece sends wrong documents to monitors... Again (FT)
  • U.S. won't let Russia 'drag us back to the past': Pentagon chief (Reuters)
  • Belgium unblocks part of Russian diplomatic missions’ frozen accounts (Tass)
  • Fed Scoop Heralded Era of Closed Doors for $100,000 Newsletters (BBG)

Stocks Soar, Germany's Dax Set For Biggest Gain In Three Years On Greek Deal "Optimism"

today is Friday taken to the nth degree, with the markets having already declared if not victory then the death of all Greek "contagion" leverage, following news that a new Greek proposal was sent yesterday (which as we summarized does not include any of the demanded by the Troika pension cuts), ignoring news that Greece had again sent Belgium the wrong proposal which the market has taken as a sign of capitulation by Tsipras, and as a result futures are surging higher by nearly 1%, the German DAX is up a whopping 3.1%, on track for the biggest one day gain in three years, Greek stocks up over 8%, German and US Treasurys sliding while Greek and peripheral bonds are surging.

Goldman And SocGen Unleash The "C"-Word: ECB Alone Can't Contain Grexit Risks

Unnamed "officials" have proclaimed a new set of Greek proposals received by Brussels tonight as "a good base," according to AFP, and thusly the Euro is very modestly bid. However, both Socgen (without a 3rd bailout of €60-80 billion over the next 3 years, Greek uncertainty remains high and leaves Grexit risk merely semi-stable) and Goldman (a deal will come only after the introduction of capital controls, a technical default on the IMF and issuance of IOUs/and a further build-up of arreas... and the damage resulting from a breaking of the integrity of the Euro would not be fixed by monetary policy alone) leave us wondering just who is buying Euros and US stocks and selling Swiss Francs as D(efault) Day looms and the 'C' word (contagion) spreads.

Bond Trading Revenues Are Plunging On Wall Street, And Why It Is Going To Get Worse

Among the renewed Greek drama, many missed a key development in the past week, namely Jefferies Q2 earnings, and particularly the company's fixed income revenue: traditionally a harbinger of profitability for Wall Street's biggest source of profit (or at least biggest source of profit in the Old Normal). And while not as abysmal as the 56% collapse in the first quarter, in the three months ended May 31 what has traditionally been the bread and butter of Dick Handler's operation generated just $153 million in revenue. CEO Handler blamed that decline on a lack of trading in the market and fewer companies selling junk bonds.

Credit Market Warning

There are large signs of stress now present in the credit markets. You might not know it from today's multi-generationally low interest rates, but other key measures such as liquidity and volatility are flashing worrying signs. While some may hope that rising yields are signaling a return to more rapid economic growth, or at least that the fear of outright deflation has lessened, the more likely explanation is that something is wrong and it’s about to get... wronger.

Greek GDP: The Shocking Reality Vs IMF Forecasts; And Who Is To Blame For The Greek Implosion

With a Greek default, shortly followed by a Grexit, a collapse of the "irreversible union" (but... but... "political capital"), and ultimately the end of the latest European monetary union experiment (the latest in a long and illustrious series of prior failures) now seemingly imminent, the blame game has begun. As the NYT noted overnight "the recriminations that would then fly would be so bitter that they would inflict a second round of damage." But who is really to blame? Simple: anyone and everyone who willingly and voluntarily was complicit with the great "can kicking" bailout fiction of the past 5 years...

Signs Of Financial Turmoil Are Brewing In Europe, China And The United States

As we move toward the second half of 2015, signs of financial turmoil are appearing all over the globe. Slowly but surely, we are starting to see the smart money head for the exits. As one Swedish fund manager put it recently, everyone wants “to avoid being caught on the wrong side of markets once the herd realizes stocks are over-valued“.

"The Fed Has Wreaked Havoc" Ron Paul Warns Markets' "Day Of Reckoning" Looms

"I am utterly amazed at how the Federal Reserve can play havoc with the market," Ron Paul exclaimed on CNBC's "Futures Now" referring to Thursday's surge in stocks, warnings that he sees it as "being very unstable." As Paul rages, "the fallacy of economic planning" has created such a "horrendous bubble" in the bond market that it's only a matter of time before the bottom falls out. And when it does, it will lead to "stock market chaos."

Why Greek Government Bonds Are Not Crashing (Spoiler Alert: There's NO Trading)

A glance at a chart of 5Y Greek Govvies shows the last trade at a 16% yield, well below the worst 20% yields - suggesting yet another storm in a teacup as "markets know best." However, this is entirely wrong! Greek government bond trading has stopped... 5Y bonds have not traded since April 24th. In fact given current equity levels, 5Y yields would be closer to 22% - as bad they have been ever. The entire fixed income market in Greece has died with CDS liquidity having collapsed and only sporadic longer-dated bonds trading.