• Phoenix Capital...
    07/02/2015 - 11:09
    This process has already begun in Europe. It will be spreading elsewhere in the months to come. Smart investors are preparing now BEFORE it hits so they are in a position to profit from it...

fixed

Tyler Durden's picture

The Futility Of Our Global Monetary Experiment





The Fed’s balance sheet grew eight times more rapidly than the economy during the last fourteen years. That’s just the inverse of the relationship that occurred back in the Golden Era. if you need any proof at all of this massive intrusion into the financial system isn’t working; the huge amount of money printing and balance sheet expansion; the unremitting financial repression and pegging of interest rates; look at that fundamental comparison. The only thing it’s really doing is simply inflating the serial bubble that ultimately reach unsustainable peaks and collapse. Hopefully on the third strike, the people who gave us these bubbles will be out.

 
Capitalist Exploits's picture

We Should All Strive to Be "Grave Dancers"





A classic tale of buying ridiculously low and creating massive value in the process

 
Tyler Durden's picture

"Cornering The Earth" - How The Rothschilds "Controlled At Least One Third Of Global Wealth" Over 100 Years Ago





"Let us control the money of a nation, and we care not who makes its laws"

- the maxim of the house of Rothschild and is the foundation principle of European banks (source).

 
Tyler Durden's picture

The Fallacies Of GDP





The common error of confusing growth with progress goes largely unnoticed, though it permeates all macroeconomic analysis. There is no better example of this mistake than the fallacies behind the interpretation of Gross Domestic Product.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Is Deutsche Bank The Next Lehman?





Looking back at the Lehman Brothers collapse of 2008, it’s amazing how quickly it all happened. In hindsight there were a few early-warning signs, but the true scale of the disaster publicly unfolded only in the final moments before it became apparent that Lehman was doomed. Could this happen to Deutsche Bank?

 
Reggie Middleton's picture

The Question Is Not Is Deutsche Bank the Next Lehman, It's "Is Lehman the Face of Banking in the Future





Is Deustche Bank the next Lehman is likely the wrong question to be asking. Is Lehman the template for European banking may be more to the point. Take it from the guy that called the Lehman debacle 5 months before the fact.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Energy Stocks Give Up Week's Gains As WTI Drops Below $60





As the reality of moar record production in a slowing demand world filter through the narrartive of a dropping inventory being dragged away into tanker storage arb, so WTI has dropped back below $60 and Energy stocks have tumbled - giving up all the week's gains. Just when the mainstream media was reconvinced that oil is fixed...

 
Tyler Durden's picture

The Fed Is Funneling The Investing Herd Off A Cliff





Once you funnel everyone into risk assets and then mask the risk to generate complacency, you guarantee a bidless market when risk reappears.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Markets Twist And Turn On Every Headline In The Endless Greek Tragedy





For a sense of what is driving sentiment this morning look no further than the Athens stock market which exploded higher yesterday on a Bloomberg story based on "two sources" that Germany was willing to compromise, only to close just as the IMF pulled a classis bad cop and announced it was halting work on Greece, and before further news from Bild that Germany was preparing for a Greek default while Europe had given Greece 24 hours to submit a final, workable proposal. As a result, it tumbled promptly at the open even as optimism persists and since the opening plunge, Greek stocks have continued to climb and are now back to yesterday's euphoric opening levels.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Why Bill Gross' Departure Did Not Roil The Bond Market: Pimco Sold To Itself





Back in October, following the shocking news that after building Pimco from the ground up, Bill Gross would depart the world's then biggest bond fund following internal infighting, there were concerns that as a result of a surge in redemptions and liquidation sales at the Gross-controlled Total Return Fund, the already illiquid bond market would suffer and potentially go bidless across various CUSIPs in order to extract the best price from the forced seller. This did not happen despite an unprecedented surge in redemptions which has seen PIMCO's AUM tumble by 60% from its peak holdings of $293 billion in April 2013. Why not?

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Futures Flat As Latest Greek Euphoria Questioned; Chinese Economy Bounces In Night Of Rate Cuts





It has been a mostly quiet overnight session with Europe solidly green on another bout of Greek hope even as Bundesbank's Weidmann warned that Greek insolvency risks are rising and Greece reporting that its unemployment rose once more from 26.1% to 26.6% in Q1, in which we got two more rate cuts by New Zealand (which sent the Kiwi crashing the most since 2011) and South Korea (the Won initially dipped only to rebound) but China stole the stage with its latest report on retail sales, industrial production, and fixed investment all of which showed a modest bounce from multi-year lows suggesting the PBOC's attempts to shock the economy into growth may be starting to work (which is bad news for the market).

 
Tyler Durden's picture

China's Global Ambitions Take Shape As AIIB Structure Revealed, Germany Pledges Full Support





As China builds its own multilateral institutions, Beijing has been keen to dispel the notion that it seeks to supplant the Bretton Woods order with its own brand of Eastern hegemony and although one can certainly question the degree to which China’s aims are rooted purely in an inclination to be benevolent towards nations in need of fixed asset investment, Beijing is making an effort to distance itself from the way the US governs the institutions under its control.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Why EIA, IEA, And BP Oil Forecasts Are Too High





When forecasting how much oil will be available in future years, most agencies, including EIA, IEA and BP appear to adopt a similar 'work-backwards from GDPO growth expectations' method. It seems that this approach has a fundamental flaw. It doesn’t consider the possibility of continued low oil prices and the impact that these low oil prices are likely to have on future oil production. Hoped-for future GDP growth may not be possible if oil prices, as well as other commodity prices, remain low.

 
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