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Wall Street Reacts To The BOE's QE Failure

As first reported yesterday, in a striking development, the BOE failed to monetize all the longer-maturity gilts it had hoped to purchase on just the second day of its restarted QE operation, as it encountered something striking: an offerless bond market. Today Wall Street responds.

US Futures Flat; Bonds Rise, Dollar And Oil Slide Over US Productivity Collapse Fears

Following yesterday's muted action which saw the S&P500 close unchanged, it has been more of the same listless trading overnight, with US equity index futures little changed as the Nikkei fell on the back of a stronger Yen, while government bonds rose and European stocks reversed early gains following the BOE failed bond monetization operation. Crude oil dropped for a second day after Saudi Arabia told OPEC that it pumped a record 10.67 million barrels of oil a day,

Misunderstanding The Real Problem: An Updated Version Of The "Peak Oil" Story

The amount of oil (or for that matter, any other resource) isn’t a fixed amount. If the price can be made to rise to a very high level, the quantity that can be extracted will also tend to rise–in fact, by a rather large amount. The “catch” is that wages for the vast majority of workers don’t rise at the same time. As a result, goods made with high-priced oil soon become too expensive for workers to afford, and the economy falls into recession. The result is prices that fall below the cost of production. Thus, the limit on oil supply is not the amount of oil in the ground; instead, it is how high oil prices can rise, without causing serious recession.

James Grant: Negative Interest Rates Will End... Badly

“Radical monetary policy begets more radical policy... It seems to me, at some point, markets or voters will put a stop to this.” If and when that time comes, Grant notes that investors will be looking for physical stores of wealth, explaining "the case for gold is not as a hedge against monetary disorder, because we have monetary disorder, but rather an investment in monetary disorder."

August Corporate Bond Issuance Breaks All Records Thanks To Relentless Demand For Yield

It has been a scorching August for the continental US, with the government predicting, for the first time on record, that every square inch of all 50 states is forecast to see above-average temperatures for the next three months. However, that is nothing compared to what is taking place in the blistering bond market, where new bond issuance is on pace to blow away all records.

Preview Of Key Events In The Coming Week

The coming week brings multiple macro data releases for July, including inflation, trade data, retail sales, IP, credit and money supply. A relatively light US data calendar next week with retail sales the main release on Friday but also import and producer prices and Michigan sentiment coming up. Retail sales will be closely watched to assess consumer spending growth for 3Q.

S&P To Open At New Record High As Commodities Rise, China Trade Disappoints

The meltup continues with the S&P500 set to open at new all time highs as futures rise 0.2% overnight, with European, Asian stocks higher, as job data pushed MSCI Asia Pacific Index towards highest close since Aug. 2015. Germany, U.K. economic data seen positive, with dollar, oil rising, and gold declining. The MSCI All-Country World Index rose 0.4% and was headed for its highest close in almost a year.

Futures, Global Stocks Rise As Oil, USDJPY Drops: All Eyes On The Jobs Report

With all eyes on today's jobs report, where consensus expects a 180K payrolls gain, European, Asian stocks and S&P futures all rise amid a surge in government debt as markets digest the BOE's "kitchen sink" easing for a second day. But please don't overthink it. In deja vu fashion, Bloomberg summarizes the action simply as "stocks rose around the world on speculation central bank stimulus measures will support the global economy." We've heard that just a few times before.

S&P Futures Flat As Europe, Asia Lifted By Banks, Yen; All Eyes On The Bank Of England

In a mostly quiet session, European and Asian stocks rose, pushed higher by financial stocks and the USDJPY which initially dipped on some hawkish comments by BOJ deputy governor Iwata, only to rebound later in the session, lifting the Nikkei 1.1%, while the Stoxx 600 rose 0.4% led higher by the banking sector. S&P futures are unchnaged after yesterday's last hour ramp. The key event is the BOE decision due in half an hour.

Goldman Finds The Treasury Market No Longer Reacts To Economic Data

According to a just released Goldman analysis, the sensitivity of US Treasury yields to economic data surprises has declined to near record-lows over the last two years. In other words, the market no longer responds to data. What does it respond to? "Treasury yields have reacted more strongly to Fed communication." But where it gets truly perverse, is that the market, by ignoring the economy, is responding to a Fed which in turn is merely responding to the market.

D-Day For Australia's Real Estate Bubble?

This rotting shack in Sydney and its tiny plot of land sold for nearly $1 million in May of 2014 – more than two years ago. Since then, house prices in Australia have increased even further. Yes, it is an insane bubble, no doubt about it... and now, it appears, the banks are finally realizing, and are pulling back.

Global Shares Slide As Japan Stimulus Disappoints, RBA Underwhelems, Italy Bank Fears Return

European stocks slid to a two-week low amid mixed earnings, as bank stocks extended yesterday’s decline as fears that Italy is not "fixed" have reemerged, not helped by an adverse market reaction to a disappointing Japanese fiscal stimulus announcement, while the AUD first dropped but then jumped after the RBA's priced in rate cut was announced, seen as underwhelming.