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Loonie Surges As BOC Keeps Rate Unchanged, Cuts 2016, 2017 GDP, Blames Brexit, Wildfires, Weak Consumption

The Bank of Canada did not surprise moments ago when it kept the overnight rate at 0.5%, as expected The Bank said that the "current stance of monetary policy is still appropriate" adding that risks to inflation profile are roughly balanced. It also said that "fundamentals remain in place for a pickup in growth over the projection horizon, albeit in a climate of heightened uncertainty." Where the BOC did surprise was in its latest cut to Canada's economic outlook: the central bank now expects GDP to grow 1.3% in 2016, 2.2% in 2017, down from 1.7%, 2.3%, respectively.

Global Stocks, Futures Rise On Disappointing Chinese Trade Data, Hopes For More Central Bank Intervention

In an otherwise quiet overnight session, which among other things saw Germany sell 10Y Bunds with a zero coupon and a negative yield (-0.05%) for the first time ever (despite being uncovered with just €4.038BN sold below the €5.00BN target) anyone hoping for a confirmation that China will be able to prop up the world economy once more, was left disappointed when earlier this morning China reported June exports and imports that once again dropped substantially in dollar terms as soft demand at home and abroad continued to weigh on the world’s largest trading nation.

Global Stocks Surge On Rising Hopes Of Japan "Helicopter Money"

A quick headline search for the phrases "Japan stimulus" and "helicopter money" is all one needs to understand the very familiar reason for today latest overnight global stock rally, which has sent the USDJPY surging some more, in the process pushing the Nikkei higher by 2.5%, China up over 1% (with the help of some late FX intervention by the PBOC), European stocks up 1%, US equity futures up 0.5%, and so on, in what is a global wave of green on the back of the helicopter money which after Bernanke's visit to Japan, market participants are now convinced is just a matter of time.

Key Events In The Coming Week

With the key event of the week flying largely under the radar, which as previewed here last week was Bernanke's visit to Japan which has already led to another global market spike, here are the rest of the week's events.

S&P 500 To Open At All Time Highs After Japan Soars, Yen Plunges On JPY10 Trillion Stimulus

S&P 500 futures are set to open at new all time highs, with global stocks rallying as the yen weakened and the Nikkei soared on speculation Japan is about to unveil the first instance of "helicopter money"-lite, as well as due to a continuation of better-than-expected U.S. jobs data. Further speculation that Italy's (and Europe's) insolvent banks will be bailed out has further boosted sentiment.

Deutsche Bank's Chief Economist Calls For €150 Billion Bailout Of European Banks

David Folkerts-Landau, the chief economist of Deutsche Bank, has called for a multi-billion dollar bailout for European banks. Speaking to Germany's Welt am Sonntag, the economist said European institutions should get fresh capital for a recapitalization following a similar bailout in the US. What he didn't say is that the US bailout took place nearly a decade ago, in the meantime Europe's financial sector was supposed to be fixed courtesy of "prudent" fiscal and monetary policy. It wasn't.

"The World Is Walking From Crisis To Crisis" - Why BofA Sees $1,500 Gold And $30 Silver

The world has been walking from crisis to crisis and we see risks that this may not change. The importance of that dynamic for the precious metals is mirrored by the high correlation between potential US GDP growth and gold quotations. Interest  rates globally are set to remain low, which in turn reduces the opportunity costs of holding a non-yielding asset like gold. We believe gold prices could rise to $1,500/oz near-term. We called a bottom in silver in April on supply and demand dynamics; an overshoot of prices to $30/oz is possible.

With Over $13 Trillion In Negative-Yielding Debt, This Is The Pain A 1% Spike In Rates Would Inflict

There is now $13 trillion of global negative-yielding debt. And, as the WSJ writes, even a small increase in interest rates could inflict hefty losses on investors. With the 2013 "taper tantrum" the Fed sparked a selloff as it discussed ending its bond-buying program known as quantitative easing. A repeat "would be very painful for a lot of people" said J.P. Morgan. This is just how painful.

Gundlach Reveals His Portfolio Which Is "Outperforming Everyone Else's"

"People say, “What kind of portfolio is that?” I say it’s one that is outperforming everybody else’s. I mean, bonds are up more than 5%, gold is up substantially this year [28%], and gold miners have had over a 100% gain. This is a year when it hasn’t been that tough to earn 10% with a portfolio. Most people think this is a dead-money portfolio. They’ve got it wrong. The dead-money portfolio is the S&P 500."

Alan "Bubbles" Greenspan Returns To Gold

The former Fed chairman says he believes another debt crisis is inevitable. He believes it will lead to high levels of inflation. His solution? Gold: “Now if we went back on the gold standard and we adhered to the actual structure of the gold standard as it exists let’s say, prior to 1913, we’d be fine. Remember that the period 1870 to 1913 was one of the most aggressive periods economically that we’ve had in the U.S., and that was a golden period of the gold standard.

 

Beautiful Brexit & The Five Stages Of Grief

The post-Brexit ‘conversation’ in Britain is taking on grotesque proportions. Nobody seems to know how to react, at least not in a rational manner. They all look to be stuck in phase one of Kübler Ross’s Five Stages of Grief, i.e. Denial. Phase two is supposed to be Anger, and while there’s plenty of that, the shape it takes makes one think Angry Denial, instead of a progression between phases. That is to say, I don’t think I’ve seen one voice expressing anger at themselves. It’s all somebody else’s fault. And it just keeps going.