Bank of America

S&P To Open Above 2,100, Eyes All Time High As Global Markets Surge, Crude Rises Above $40

If asking traders where stocks and oil would be trading one day after a weekend in which the Doha OPEC meeting resulted in a spectacular failure, few if any would have said the S&P would be over 2,100, WTI would be back over $40 and the VIX would be about to drop to 12 and yet that is precisely where the the S&P500 is set to open today, hitting Goldman's year end target 8 months early, and oblivious of the latest batch of poor earnings news, this time from Intel and Netflix, both of which are sharply lower. We expect that after taking out any 2,100 stops, the S&P will then make a solid effort to take out all time highs, now just over 1% away.

Futures Wipe Out Most Overnight Losses Following Dramatic Rebound In Crude

Following yesterday's OPEC "production freeze" meeting in Doha which ended in total failure, where in a seemingly last minute change of heart Saudi Arabia and specifically its deputy crown prince bin Salman revised the terms of the agreement demanding Iran participate in the freeze after all knowing well it won't, oil crashed and with it so did the strategy of jawboning for the past 2 months had been exposed for what it was: a desperate attempt to keep oil prices stable and "crush shorts" while global demand slowly picked up.  And whether it is central banks, or chronic BTFDers, just 12 hours after oil opened for trading with a loud crash, the commodity has nearly wiped out all losses, and both brent and WTI were down barely 2%, leading to both European stocks and US equity futures virtually unchanged on the session. 

Gold Money's picture

Fiat Money Fairytales

Frequently one can tell by the title of an opinion piece whether it is going to consist of quality arguments or just meretricious mudslinging. Professor Charles Postel of San Francisco State University boldly announces the latter in choosing to title his recent tirade against sound money, "Why Conservatives Spin Fairytales About the Gold Standard". As this article is so typical of what we seek to rebut, we publish it here, and now.

Visualizing The History Of Credit Cards

While it may seem today that credit is impersonal and calculated, credit was once a privilege built around personal trust and long-lasting relationships. Today, 80% of U.S. households own multiple cards, and they account for just under $1 trillion of consumer debt...

The Fed Sends A Frightening Letter To JPMorgan, Corporate Media Yawns

Yesterday the Federal Reserve released a 19-page letter that it and the FDIC had issued to Jamie Dimon, the Chairman and CEO of JPMorgan Chase, on April 12 as a result of its failure to present a credible plan for winding itself down if the bank failed. The letter carried frightening passages and large blocks of redacted material in critical areas, instilling in any careful reader a sense of panic about the U.S. financial system. The Federal regulators didn’t say JPMorgan could pose a threat to its shareholders or Wall Street or the markets. It said the potential threat was to “the financial stability of the United States.”

What Happens Next (In Europe)?

A year ago today, European equities hit their highest levels ever. But, as Bloomberg reports, the euphoria about Mario Draghi’s stimulus program didn’t last, and trader skepticism is now rampant. The Stoxx Europe 600 Index has lost 17% since its record, and investors who piled in last year are now unwinding bets at the fastest rate since 2013 as analysts predict an earnings contraction. The trading pattern looks familiar: a fast run to just over 400 on the gauge, then disaster...

"If No Agreement, Expect A Sharp Selloff" - All You Need To Know About Doha

Sunday’s producer meeting is all about nothing no matter what agreement might be forged. At best, the agreement will be, as Russia’s energy minister has stated, a gentlemen’s affair, with no binding commitments, no concrete next steps beyond having a review meeting, and no procedure for moving to production cuts.

Frontrunning: April 15

  • Global stocks, dollar and oil cool ahead of Doha meeting (Reuters)
  • Oil Falls Before Doha as Global Markets Brace for Weekend Risk (BBG)
  • China Growth Slows; Revival Policies Appear to Gain Traction (WSJ)
  • White House hopefuls Clinton, Sanders joust in Brooklyn brawl (Reuters)
  • Trump talks up 'New York values' as protesters demonstrate against him (Reuters)
  • Sanders Can’t Clarify Wall Street Plan in Testy Clinton Debate (BBG)

Futures Fade As Chinese "Good News Is Bad News" For Fed, Oil Drops As Doha Concerns Emerge

Good news is still bad news after all. After last night's China 6.7% GDP print which while the lowest since Q1 2009, was in line with expectations, coupled with beats in IP, Fixed Asset Investment and Retail Sales (on the back of $1 trillion in total financing in Q1)  the sentiment this morning is that China has turned the corner (if only for the time being). And that's the problem, because while China was a good excuse for the Fed to interrupt its rate hike cycle as the biggest "global" threat, that is no longer the case if China has indeed resumed growing. As such Yellen no longer has a ready excuse to delay. This is precisely why futures are lower as of this moment, because suddenly the "scapegoat" narrative has evaporated.

Peter Schiff Slams Managers' "Denial... And Mindless Optimism"

The Winter of 2015-2016, which came to an end a few weeks ago, has been officially designated as the mildest in the U.S. in 121 years according to NOAA. While this fact will certainly add a major talking point in the global warming debate, it should also be front and center in the current economic discussion. The fact that it isn’t is testament to the blatantly self-serving manner in which economic cheerleaders blame the weather when it’s convenient, but ignore it when it’s not.

In Its Second Attempt At Going Public, BATS Prices $253 Million IPO At $19/Share

It's time for try number two. Moments ago BATS announced that it has just priced its second attempt at going public by pricing its (second) initial public offering at a price to the public of $19.00 per share (this time the high end of the range). The size of the offering has been increased from the initially announced 11,200,000 shares of common stock to 13,300,000 shares of common stock.

Frontrunning: April 14

  • Global shares reach four-month high, forex hit by Singapore sting (Reuters)
  • Dollar Rally Hits Commodities as Europe Halts Global Stock Gains (BBG)
  • Currencies Across Asia Fall Sharply Against U.S. Dollar (WSJ)
  • IEA expects limited impact from oil output freeze at Doha (Reuters)
  • IEA Sees Oil Oversupply Almost Gone in Second Half on Shale Drop (BBG)
  • BofA Profit Declines 13% on Trading Slump, Energy Reserves (BBG)

BofA Profit Misses, Tumbles 13% On Trading Revenue Slide, Build In Energy Reserves

Expectations of a "less terrible" first quarter for banks may have been premature following yesterday's stronger than expected JPM earnings report. First it was both PNC and Blackrock missing on the top and bottom line, but the highlight of the day was Bank of America which moments ago reported $0.20 in EPS, missing expectations of a $0.21 print, while revenue ex-DVA dropped by $1.4 billion to $19.7 billion, also missing expectations of a $20bn print. BofA reported Net Income of $2.68 billion, down from $3.1 billion one year ago.

U.S. Futures Flat After Oil Erases Overnight Losses; Dollar In The Driver's Seat

In another quiet overnight session, the biggest - and unexpected - macro news was the surprise monetary easing by Singapore which as previously reported moved to a 2008 crisis policy response when it adopted a "zero currency appreciation" stance as a result of its trade-based economy grinding to a halt. As Richard Breslow accurately put it, "If you need yet another stark example of the fantasy storytelling we amuse ourselves with, juxtapose today’s Monetary Authority of Singapore policy statement with the storyline that the Asian stock market rally intensified on renewed optimism over the global economy. Singapore is a proxy for trade and economic growth ground to a halt last quarter." The Singapore announcement led to a sharp round of regional currency weakness just as the dollar appears to have bottomed and is rapidly rising.