Bank of England

Frontrunning: September 29

  • Stocks Jump as OPEC Splits Markets; Indian Assets Drop on Attack (BBG)
  • In U-Turn, Saudis Choose Higher Prices Over Free Oil Markets (BBG)
  • Congress Passes Spending Bill to Keep Government Running (WSJ)
  • Wells Fargo chief Stumpf heads to Hill with pressure mounting (Reuters)
  • Lawmakers Won’t Let Wells Fargo Forget Its Scandal Anytime Soon (BBG)

The Banquet Of Consequences Is Being Served (By The Central Banking Cartel)

Last week, the Federal Reserve decided to keep US interest rates unchanged, marking its 96th month of life at the zero bound. Apparently, for all of its "data dependence", the Fed feels the economy could still benefit from *just* a little more of its ZIRP happy juice. But as anyone with a little common sense will tell you, More is not always better. It's quite possible to have too much of a good thing. And in its pursuit to kick the can for a little longer, the Fed has crossed a dangerous line.

Former Goldman Chief Economist Jim O'Neill Quits UK Government

While the UK has so far avoided to implode in a depressionary supernova in the aftermath of Brexit contrary to what most of the "experts" and Tokyo-owned UK journalists had predicted, changes are taking place, mostly among the top echelons of power. Earlier today, the latest political fallout from the Brexit vote was the news that former Goldman economist, and BRIC acornym creator, Lord Jim O’Neill, resigned from the U.K. government.

Frontrunning: September 23

  • Futures slip after three-day rally as oil dips (Reuters)
  • Charlotte protests diminish early on Friday as family views video (Reuters)
  • Undecided Voters Are Proving a Tough Sell for Clinton and Trump (BBG)
  • Facebook Overestimated Key Video Metric For Two Years (WSJ)
  • Trump received $1.6 million from Secret Service (Politico)

Soothing Fed Sends Global Stocks, US Futures, Commodities Higher

Following the Fed's "hawkish hold" and the BOJ's "confused contradiction", global risk (and non-risk) assets got the green light, and as a result stocks and bonds rallied in Asia and Europe, with US equity futures rising another 0.4%, advancing with oil and industrial metals, as iron surged in Chinese trading.