• Phoenix Capital...
    05/30/2015 - 12:50
    In simple terms, if the system is ever under duress again, money market funds can lock in capital (meaning you can’t get your money out) for up to 10 days. This is just the start of a much...

Bank of Japan

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How Japan's Unemployment Rate Dropped Even As 280,000 People Lost Their Jobs





Yesterday Japan amazed everyone when it reported that its unemployment rate had dropped yet again, this time to 3.3%, the lowest since April 1997. The paradox is that while the number of Japan's unemployed dropped by 20,000, the number of those employed plunged by 280,000! Or as Goldman calls, it "growth in jobholders looks to have peaked amid a lack of recovery momentum in the economy"

 
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Do Not Show This Chart To Bank Of Japan Governor Kuroda





As another example of "has the world gone mad?" - we present the following words of wisdom from BoJ Governor Kuroda-san:

*KURODA DOESN'T SEE ANY ASSET BUBBLE OR STOCK MARKET BUBBLE, OR ANY 'FINANCIAL EXCESS' IN ECONOMY

And in the interests of sanity, we highly suggest he not look at the chart below...

 
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Futures In The Red On Europe Jitters Ahead Of Obligatory Low-Volume Levitation





While yesterday most markets were closed and unable to express their concerns at the very strong showing of "anti-austerity" parties in Spain's municipal election from Sunday, then today they have free reign to do just that, and as a result European stocks are broadly lower, alongside the EURUSD which dripped under 1.09 earlier today, with Spanish banks among the worst performers: Shares of Banco Sabadell, Bankia, Caixabank and Popular were down 1.8 to 2.3% earlier this morning, and while the stronger dollar was a gift to both the Nikkei and Europe in early trading, after opening in the green, Spain's IBEX has since slid into the red on concerns of what happens if the Greek anti-status quo contagion finally shifts to the Pyrenees.

 
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The Single Largest Misallocation of Capital in History





The global Central Banks, driven by their Keynesian lunacy, have induced the single largest misallocation of capital in history.

 
 
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Frontrunning: May 22





  • U.S. vows to continue patrols after China warns spy plane (Reuters)
  • Bank of Japan Chief Cheers On Tokyo’s Surging Stocks (WSJ)
  • Merkel Stamps Out Optimism on Greece After Tsipras Talks (BBG)
  • Greece sees reforms deal with lenders in next 10 days (Reuters)
  • Why Greece’s Syriza party is not sticking to the script on an IMF deal (Channel4)
  • Why Does Putin Care Who Runs a Tiny Balkan Nation? Gas Pipelines (BBG)
  • U.S. Stock-Index Futures Are Little Changed Before Yellen Speech (BBG)
  • German Business Confidence Declines as Risks Cloud Outlook (BBG)
 
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Chinese Stock Bubble Frenzy Returns; US Futures Flat Ahead Of Today's Pre-Holiday Zero Volume Melt Up





The highlight of the overnight newsflow may have been the BOJ's preannounced statement that it is keeping its QE unchanged (which comes as no surprise after a few weeks ago the BOJ adimitted it would be unable to keep inflation "stable" at the 2% in the required timeframe), but the highlight of overnight markets was certainly China, where the Banzai Buyers have reemerged, leading to another whopping +2.8% session for the Shanghai Composite which has now risen to a fresh 7 years high.

 
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Despite Weak Economic Data Overnight, Futures Slide On Rate Hike Concerns





The big news overnight was neither the Chinese manufacturing PMI miss nor the just as unpleasant (and important) German manufacturing and service PMI misses, but that speculation about a rate hike continues to grow louder despite the abysmal economic data lately, with the latest vote of support of a 25 bps rate increase coming from Goldman which overnight updated its "Fed staff model" and found surprisingly little slack in the economy suggesting that the recent push to blame reality for not complying with economist models (and hence the need for double seasonal adjustments) is gaining steam, and as we first suggested earlier this week, it may just happen that the Fed completely ignores recent data, and pushes on to tighten conditions, if only to rerun the great Trichet experiment of the summer of 2011 when the smallest of rate hikes resulted in a double dip recession.

 
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4 Factors Signaling Volatility Will Return With A Vengeance





The uncertainty surrounding the inevitability, if not the exact timing, of multiple and possibly overlapping volatility drivers is itself a source of volatility. For the average person, these signs can be scary. Taking steps to avoid the circus as much as possible, such as extracting money from the markets, securing personal assets, and waiting out the swings, can be a source of emotional comfort and future financial stability.

 
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Our "Junkie Economy" Will Soon Hit Rock Bottom





A robust economy would allow central banks to raise rates and still allow debts to be paid down. But that is not what is happening. And it won’t happen. Junkies rarely go out and get a job... and gradually “taper off” their habit. No. They have to crash... hit bottom... and sink into such misery that they have no choice but to go cold turkey. Now, major central banks are committed to QE and ZIRP forever. They have created an economy that is addicted to EZ money. It will have to be smashed to smithereens before the feds change their policies.

 
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How China Covered The World In "Liquidity Swap Lines"





Central bank liquidity lines like those the Fed used to bailout the world seven years ago have become a fixture of the post crisis financial system. Since 2009, China has essentially blanketed the globe with yuan liquidity lines, inking swap agreements with nearly three dozen countries with the primary goal of increasing the degree to which the renminbi is used in international trade.

 
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How Japan Became The Benchmark For America's Fraudulent "Jobs Recovery"





Explaining all that is wrong with the fraudulent US "jobs recovery" using the case study of Japan.

 
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It's Official: The BoJ Has Broken The Japanese Stock Market





Monetizing the entirety of gross government bond issuance and amassing an equity portfolio worth just shy of $100 billion on the way to cornering the entire ETF market may come across as insanely irresponsible even in a world that is now defined by insanely irresponsible central banks, but Haruhiko Kuroda does not care because when it comes to QE and the financing of governments via central bank-assisted ponzi schemes, no one does it like the BoJ.

 
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Return Of Bond Market Stability Pushes Equity Futures Higher





Following yesterday's turbulent bond trading session, where the volatility after the worst Bid to Cover in a Japanese bond auction since 2009 spread to Europe and sent Bund yields soaring again, in the process "turmoiling" equities, today's session has been a peaceful slumber barely interrupted by "better than expected" Italian and a German Bund auction, both of which concluded without a hitch, and without the now traditional "technical" failure when selling German paper. Perhaps that was to be expected considering the surge in the closing yield from 0.13% to 0.65%. Not hurting the bid for 10Y US Treasury was yesterday's report that Japan had bought a whopping $23 billion in US Treasurys in March, the most in 4 years so to all those shorting Tsys - you are now once again fighting the Bank of Japan.

 
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A Portrait Of The Classical Gold Standard





"It was, at least in theory, simple enough in the old days," wrote a wistful W. Randolph Burgess, head of the New York Federal Reserve, in 1938. "In the present strange new world, where the old gold portents have lost their former meaning, where is the radio beam which the central banker may follow? What is the equivalent of gold?" The men of his era and of the late nineteenth century understood the meaning of such a question and, more importantly, why it is one that must be asked. But theirs was a different world, indeed — one without "QE," ZIRP," or "Unknown Knowns" as fiscal policy. And there were no helicopters, either.

 
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