Bank of Japan

Japan: A Future Of Stagnation

Take a declining population with declining rates of productivity growth and load it up with debt, and you get a triple-whammy recipe for permanent stagnation. There are Degrowth strategies that make sense because they're designed to be sustainable, but first the systems that have been designed to fail - Keynesian stimulus policies and the banking system - must be allowed to fail.

Global Stocks Rebound As Brexit Odds Decline Following Tragic Death Of UK Lawmaker

While it may very well not last and all of yesterday's gains could evaporate instantly if the Brexit vote is set to take place as scheduled, all 10 industry groups in the MSCI All-Country World Index advanced, with the index rising 0.7% trimming the week’s drop 1.6%. The Stoxx Europe 600 Index rose 1.4%. Futures on the S&P 500 were little changed, after equities Thursday snapped their longest losing streak since February. . Oil rose, paring its biggest weekly decline in more than two months. Bond yields around the globe fell.

Will Brexit Give The US Negative Interest Rates?

One of the oddest things in this increasingly odd world is the spread of negative interest rates everywhere but in the US. One answer is that the Bank of Japan and the European Central Bank are buying up all the high-quality (and increasing amounts of low-quality) debt in their territories, thus forcing down rates, while the US Fed has stopped its own bond buying program. The other answer is that this is just one of those periodic anomalies that persist for a while and then get arbitraged away. And Brexit might be the catalyst for that phase change.

Global Stocks Continue To Plunge As Central Banks Disappoint, Brexit Looms

Futures on the S&P 500 slipped 0.3%, as U.S. equities are on track to extend losses for a sixth day.  Europe's Stoxx 600 fell to a four-month low, sliding 1% for its sixth decline in seven days, and U.S. crude retreated for a sixth day in the longest losing streak since February. Bond yields sank to records in Germany, Australia after Japan as Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen said next week’s U.K. vote on European Union membership was a factor in the decision to hold interest rates steady. The Yen surged more than 2% as the Bank of Japan refrained from adding any new stimulus,

USDJPY, Nikkei Plunge As BoJ Disappoints With "No Change"

While only 5 of 40 economists expected a rate cut and only 7 of 39 any additional easing, hopes were rife for some additional ETF buying or hints at further stock purchasing by The Bank of Japan... but no. USDJPY immediatley plunged to a 104 handle and Nikkei 225 crashed 300 points.

All Eyes On Yellen As Global Stocks Rebound Despite Brexit Fears, Record Low Yields

US equity index futures and global stocks rebounded for the first time in 6 days, ahead of Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen’s remarks, while Chinese manipulation prevented a selloff in Chinese stocks when MSCI refused to add the country to its EM index due to fears about... manipulation. Sterling has rebounded despite ongoing Brexit doom and gloom. Oil is the only key commodity that has failed to stage a modest rebound, while gold is down alongside the dollar, just because.

QE: The Good, Bad And Ugly (Or, Why War Is Coming)

"The ugly part comes in when thinking about how to exit QE, if at all. Unfortunately I can't help but think of how the Great Depression ended: it was a boost of fiscal spending, all right: the financing of a war... note that increasing military expenditures in the name of national defense may be more easily passed through the legislature in countries without strong majorities than infrastructure spending. Add to that a rise in populist politicians throughout the world, and we have a mix that suggests to me history may well repeat to those unwilling to learn from it."

Fitch Cuts Japan's Credit Outlook To Negative

Following Abe's decision to delay the April 2017 increase in the consumption tax, warnings about Japan's rating (recall that Japan's consolidated debt/GDP ratio is the highest in the world at 400%) were inevitable, and moments ago Fitch was the first to come out and while "affirming" Japan's AA rating, it was the first major agency to cut its outlook from Stable to Negative. Expect the other two big agencies to do the same, followed inevitably by downgrades.

Hedge Fund CIO Explains How "This Year's Money Will Be Made"

"This year’s money will be made when the cycle breaks." A stubbornly hawkish Fed could break the cycle, raising rates in a determined fashion, enduring a dollar rally, weaker equities. A persistently dovish Fed could interrupt the cycle, letting asset prices run, supported by a weaker dollar. Or an exogenous shock, like Brexit, could break the cycle too, reorienting the world.

Pictet: "The Pricing And Valuation Of Bonds No Longer Reflects Fundamentals" - Why This Matters

"Wicksellians believe that in today’s climate, where markets are being swamped with money pumped in by central banks via QE, long-term sovereign bond yields need to rise steeply to revert to their ‘natural’ rate of interest. An unexpected spike in inflation might be the trigger for this upward movement. According to proponents of this scenario, bonds would then be sent crashing. Conversely, the Fisherian camp believes that low government bond yields essentially reflect the anaemic state of the economy. Wicksellians are duly offloading their positions in government bonds, whereas Fisherians are building up theirs."

Global Stocks Sharply Lower As Bond Yields Hit New Record Lows; Oil Slides Below $50

Global stocks, U.S. index futures are sharply lower pressured by fears of another day of record low bond yields, as investors start to worry about numerous risk catalysts in the coming weeks, from the Brexit vote to Fed meeting. The Dollar spot index rose for the second day in a row, pushing commodities lower for their first two-day decline since May 24, while WTI has dipped back under $50.

"Deliberately Overblown" Brexit Fears Backfire

As the June 23rd BREXIT (the UK-wide referendum to leave the EU) vote draws near, the polls indicate a close result. Those urging a vote for the UK to remain inside the EU are suggesting increasingly dire economic consequences that would follow a yes vote by the British people to leave. Voices from London, Brussels, and Washington have all put immense pressure on British voters to bend to the will of the elites. To listen to their commentary one would think that apocalypse was just around the corner. But is there any substance to their warnings?