Bank of Japan

testosteronepit's picture

Revenge of the Japanese Zombie Banks





Plowed $2 trillion of their Japanese deposit base into investments overseas then wondered why the economy at home languished

 
testosteronepit's picture

“We Don’t Feel Any Impact Of Abenomics Here”





Japan’s vast network of local banks: caught between slack loan demand from businesses and the treacherous currents of Abenomics

 
GoldCore's picture

Silver Imports Double In India - Bullion Coin, Bar and ETF Demand Surging





The U.S. Mint’s sales of silver coins are heading for a record again this year, with sales of 33 million ounces (1,026 tonnes) to late August already matching the level of the whole of 2012.

Many other mints including the Perth Mint, the Royal Canadian Mint and the Austrian Mint have also seen a fall in sales recently but are set for record or near record sales again this year.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Frontrunning: September 4





  • Yes: Support Builds in Congress for U.S. Strike Against Syria (WSJ)
  • No: Boehner backs Obama on Syria, but House leaning toward ‘no’ (The Hill)
  • U.S. Congress fight over Syria pits establishment versus upstarts (Reuters)
  • Wednesday humor: Japan’s Abe Says Fukushima Will Be Resolved Before 2020 Olympics (BBG)
  • Bank of Japan to Consider Further Easing if Sales Tax Hike Goes Ahead (Reuters)
  • S&P accuses U.S. Justice Department of filing $5 billion lawsuit against it in "retaliation" for the company's downgrade of America's debt in 2011 (WSJ)
  • German Candidates Spar Over Records (WSJ)
  • Emerging Nations Save $2.9 Trillion Reserves in Rout (BBG)
  • Split Congress Mulls Denial of Military Force Request (BBG)
  • Sharp Fall in Overseas Investment By Chinese Firms (WSJ)
  • Jorge Lemann: He Is...the World's Most Interesting Billionaire (BusinessWeek)
  • Why Amazon Is on a Warehouse Building Spree (BW)
 
Eugen Bohm-Bawerk's picture

A Complete Guide to European Bail-Out Facilities - Part 1: ECB





This is our first out of four series where we look at all the various bail-out schemes concocted by Eurocrats.

Today we look at how the ECB has evolved since 2007. In the next three posts we will look at the Target2 system, various fiscal transfer mechanisms and last, but not least the emergence of a full banking union.

 
Pivotfarm's picture

Japan and US: Much of a Sameness





There’s too much of a sameness about Japan and the USA today. The Land of the Rising Sun and good old Uncle Sam have been copying each other far too much and now it seems as if they are railroading on the same train to the Land of Debt.

 
Pivotfarm's picture

Big Mistake: the Fed’s Quantitative Teasing





It’s a big mistake. Maybe some might say that the Fed altogether is a mistake itself. But, it’s made some big, ugly mistakes that don’t bare thinking about and yet there’s no understanding why they took those decisions.

 
testosteronepit's picture

When “QE Infinity” Turns Into A Pipedream: Hot Money Evaporates, Rout Follows – See Emerging Markets





The Fed and other central banks have accomplished a huge feat: a worldwide tsunami of hot money. Which is now receding.

 
Phoenix Capital Research's picture

The Line Bernanke is Praying Won't Break





This isn’t just any trendline. This is THE trendline. Take it out and the 10 year will likely be yielding 5-6% in no time… which by the way is where it was for most of the ‘90s and very early ‘00s.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Guest Post: Why We All Lose if the Fed Wins





So let's pretend for the moment that the Federal Reserve gets everything it has stated it wants.  And even further: that Washington, D.C. gets everything it wants, too. The credit markets are repaired, and massive new loan growth flows out the door.  Loans are made to businesses that hire gobs of new people.  Consumers borrow and borrow some more to go to school and buy homes, cars, and gadgets. Inflation remains low and job growth explodes.  Tax receipts climb and the deficit falls.  The stock market goes higher and higher, gold falls and then falls some more, as confidence in the system, its masters, and its institutions grows. The Fed wins and D.C. wins. But in reality, we all lose. It's all just a matter of timing (and un-sustainability).

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Why Isn't There A Demonstrably Correct Economic Theory?





After 2000 years, why do we not know which economic theory is correct: Keynesian, Marxism, or Hayek-Friedman? Surely, there is a demonstrably, statistically correct answer. It appears not. Then why do we have cargo-cult faiths (Keynesianism) instead of demonstrably correct models of economic behavior.

 
Phoenix Capital Research's picture

The Smart Money is Leaving the Building





Traders and investors do not respond to sea changes instantly. The smart ones take note and begin adjusting their portfolios and hedging their bets. This doesn’t result in massive market moves as these investors are sophisticated enough to move out of old positions and into new ones without drawing too much attention

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Beware The Rise In International Monetary Policy Tensions





As the Fed gets ready to taper ‘QE’, UBS' Larry Hatheway warns investors to brace for a period of increased international policy tension. Previously harmonized - but not coordinated - monetary policy stances will give way to conflicting objectives and new strains as adverse ‘spillovers’ occur. As Hatheway notes, we are about to rediscover several inconvenient truths. First, the Fed is the US, not the world’s, central bank. Second, international policy coordination is desirable in an interdependent world but, third, it is no more likely to materialize now than in the past. The world, it seems, is destined for a less comfortable policy co-existence in the coming few years.

 
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