Bank of New York

Monetary Metals's picture

Four-Letter “G” Word Discussed on TV





Michael Woolfolk took the anti-gold position and Komal Sri-Kumar defended a gold standard on Bloomberg TV.  Is it true that we don't have enough gold for a gold standard?  Is it true that a gold standard is established by government fixing the price of gold?

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Will Currency Wars End With A Return To The Gold Standard?





Concerns about the devaluations and the growing risk of a severe bout of inflation have led to calls for a return to fixed exchange rates and a gold standard. Bloomberg’s Trish Regan and Adam Johnson interviewed TCW Group’s Komal Sri-Kumar and Bank of New York Mellon's Michael Woolfolk about the risks from currency wars on Bloomberg Television's "Street Smart." Trish Regan asks whether there is a danger that “we have massive inflation worldwide for years to come?” The answer is yes and both agree that inflation is a real risk as is a loss of credibility by central banks.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

How A Previously Secret Collateral Transformation With The Bank Of Italy Prevented Monte Paschi's Nationalization





The endless Italian bailout story that keeps on giving, has just given some more. It turns out Italy's insolvent Banca dei Monte Paschi, which has been in the headlines for the past month due to its role as political leverage against the frontrunning Bersani bloc, and which has been bailed out openly so many times in the past 4 years we have lost track, and whose cesspool of a balance sheet disclose one after another previously secret derivative deal on an almost daily basis, can now add a previously unannounced bailout by the Bank of Italy to its list of recent historical escapades.

 
4closureFraud's picture

Fraudclosure Fail | ROMAN PINO vs THE BANK OF NEW YORK – Florida Supreme Court: We Can't Stop the Fraud





There are no ramifications if you get caught defrauding the court. Just take a voluntary dismissal and start over. We now have a court system, an entire judicial system, that supports fraud...

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Italian Bond Yields Spike To 6 Week Highs On Surge In Monte Paschi Loss Expectations





Nearly a month ago, the first expose on a previously secret money-losing derivative at Italy's Banca dei Monte Paschi emerged and nobody took notice. A few days later a second derivative emerged, and the market finally paid attention sending the stock plunging and political spirits in Italy stirring due to the repeatedly bailed out bank's close ties to the leading Italian Democratic Party. Then a third and a fourth derivative emerged. This, of course was just after Italy's Finance Minister Grilli assured everyone that Monte Paschi is "solid", that oversight of the bank was "continuous and thorough", that "aid was not to help an insolvent bank" and most hilariously, that "the Italian banking system is unique for no bailouts" (except for all the bailouts as Rajoy might add). It was also after various assurances that the first two derivatives were all there was, that Mario Draghi did not know about any of this, until it was revealed he knew years ago, and that no other banks would be impaired. Well, while we still don't know how deep the derivative rot has spread in Italy, but it is guaranteed it does not stop at BMPS, we have now learned of yet another derivative, this time with JPM, that the bank had lied even more, and also that the previously loss estimates for Monte Paschi were, naturally, optimistic and that the final loss may be up to (or over) €1 billion.

 

 
Phoenix Capital Research's picture

Germany Fires a Warning Shot at the Fed





 

 Underneath the veneer of goodwill and the occasional necessary coordinated intervention, tensions are rising between Central Banks. When the US debases the US Dollar it pushes the Euro higher. This hurts German exports which in turn angers the Bundesbank.

 
 
Tyler Durden's picture

Frontrunning: January 22





  • Geithner allegations beg Fed reform (Reuters)
  • BOJ Adopts Abe’s 2% Target in Commitment to End Deflation (BBG)
  • Bundesbank Head Cautions Japan (WSJ)
  • In speech, Obama pushes activist government and takes on far right (Reuters)
  • Atari’s U.S. Operations File for Chapter 11 Bankruptcy (BBG)
  • Israel goes to polls, set to re-elect Netanyahu (Reuters)
  • Apple May Face First Profit Drop in Decade as IPhone Slows (BBG)
  • EU states get blessing for financial trading tax (Reuters)
  • Indian Jeweler Becomes Billionaire as Gold Price Surges (BBG)
  • Europe Stocks Fall; Deutsche Bank Drops on Bafin Request (BBG)
  • Algeria vows to fight Qaeda after 38 workers killed (Reuters)
  • GS Yuasa Searched After Boeing 787s Are Grounded (BBG)
  • Slumping pigment demand eats into DuPont's profit (Reuters)
 
clokey's picture

A Rally Without Investors And Other Musings





Over the course of the last two weeks, I attempted to explain to the general investing public how, thanks to the virtual impossibility of distinguising between 'legitimate' market making and 'illegitimate' prop trading, some of America's systemically important financial institutions are able to trade for their own accounts with the fungible cash so generously bestowed upon them by an unwitting multitude of depositors and an enabling Fed. 

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Germany's Gold Repatriation Unlikely To Assuage Public Concerns





Whether the repatriation of only some 20% of Germany's gold reserves from the Federal Reserve Bank of New York and the Banque of Paris back to Frankfurt manages to allay German concerns remains in question.  Especially given that the transfer from the Federal Reserve is set to take place slowly over a seven year period and will only be completed in 2020. The German Precious Metals Association and Germany's ‘Repatriate Our Gold’ campaign said that the move by the Bundesbank did not negate the need for a full audit of Germany's gold. They want this to take place in order to protect against impairment of the gold reserves through leases and swaps. Indeed, they have called for independent, full, neutral and physical audits of the gold reserves of the world's central banks and the repatriation of all central bank gold - the physical transport of gold reserves back into the respective sovereign ownership countries. It seems likely that we may only have seen another important milestone in the debate about German and global gold reserves.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Frontrunning: January 17





  • Obama's Gun Curbs Face a Slog in Congress (BBG)
  • Euro Area Seen Stalling as Draghi’s Pessimism Shared (BBG)
  • China Begins to Lose Edge as World's Factory Floor (WSJ)
  • EU Car Sales Slump (WSJ)
  • Fed Concerned About Overheated Markets Amid Record Bond-Buying (BBG)
  • Australia Posts Worst Back-to-Back Job Growth Since ’97 (BBG)
  • Abe Currency Policy Stokes Gaffe Risk as Amari Roils Yen (BBG)
  • Japan Opposition Party Won’t Back BOJ Officials for Governor (BBG)
  • Fed Reports Point to Subdued Economic Growth (WSJ)
  • China Set to Exit Slowdown by Boosting Infrastructure (BBG)
  • Greece not out of woods, must stick to reforms: finance minister (Reuters)
  • Russian Rate Debate Flares Up as Cabinet Seeks Growth (BBG)
 
Tyler Durden's picture

Frontrunning: January 14





  • Guess who doesn't believe in the "great rotation out of bonds and into stocks": Abe Aids Bernanke as Japan Seen Buying Foreign Debt (BBG)
  • AIG Sues Federal Reserve Vehicle in Dispute Over Lawsuit Rights (WSJ)
  • JPMorgan Said to Weigh Disclosing Whale Report Faulting Dimon (BBG)
  • Ugly Choices Loom Over Debt Clash (WSJ)
  • Credit Suisse to cut bonus pool by 20 percent (Reuters)
  • Brazilian Bikini Waxes Make Crab Lice Endangered Species (BBG)
  • EU redrafts plan for bank rescue funding (FT)
  • JCPenney stock plunges after bad holiday (NY Post)
  • Regulator Comments Buoy Shanghai Stocks (WSJ)
  • Japan voters back PM Abe's efforts to spur growth, beat deflation (Reuters)
  • Cameron averts row over Europe speech (FT)
  • Swatch Buys Harry Winston Jewelry Brand for $1 Billion (BBG)
 
Tyler Durden's picture

FleeceBook: Meet JP Morgan's Matt Zames





Previously, in our first two editions of FleeceBook, we focused on "public servants" working for either the Bank of International Settlements, or the Bank of England (doing all they can to generate returns for private shareholders, especially those of financial firms). Today, for a change, we shift to the private sector, and specifically a bank situated at the nexus of public and private finance: JP Morgan, which courtesy of its monopolist position at the apex of the Shadow Banking's critical Tri-Party Repo system (consisting of The New York Fed, The Bank of New York, and JP Morgan, of course) has an unparalleled reach (and domination - much to Lehman Brother's humiliation) into not only traditional bank funding conduits, but "shadow" as well. And of all this bank's employees, by far the most interesting, unassuming and "underappreciated" is neither its CEO Jamie Dimon, nor the head of JPM's global commodities group (and individual responsible for conceiving of the Credit Default Swap product) Blythe Masters, but one Matt Zames.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Trillion Dollar Platinum Coin Is "Not The Solution" - PIMCO's Gross





PIMCO founder and co chief investment officer Bill Gross gives no credence to the trillion dollar platinum coin scheme. "We feel that such an action would not only jeopardise the U.S. Fed and Treasury standing with Congress but with creditor nations internationally - particularly the Russians and Chinese." It appears to be a bit of a stunt by and may be a convenient distraction away from the substantive issue of how the U.S. manages to address its massive budget deficits, national debt and unfunded liabilities of between $50 trillion and $100 trillion. It may also be designed to create the false impression that there are easy solutions to the intractable US debt crisis - thereby lulling investors and savers into a false sense of security ... again. Gross said that subject to the debt ceiling, the Fed is buying everything that Treasury can issue. He warns that we have this "conglomeration of monetary and fiscal policy" as not just the US is doing this but Japan and the Eurozone is doing this also. Gross has recently criticised the Fed's 'government financing scheme.'  He has in recent months been warning of the medium term risk of inflation due to money creation and recently warned of 'inflationary dragons.'

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Guest Post: Is American Justice Dead?





Every nation-state has a body of laws woven into the fabric of society. As Peruvian economist Hernando de Soto has commented on extensively, the stronger the rule of law, the stronger the economy. And by "stronger" laws, I mean laws that are impervious to tampering for personal or political gains. The connection between a sound judiciary and economic health is readily comprehensible, except maybe to a politician... businesses and individuals are far more likely to invest capital in a country with understandable laws that are impartially and universally enforced than if the opposite condition exists. That's because the lack of a consistent body of law breeds uncertainty and adds a huge element of risk for entrepreneurs. Which brings us back to the matter at hand – American justice on a slippery slope.

 
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