Bear Stearns

Musical Chairs

Economics is a bit like musical chairs. In a recession, the economy takes a hit and there are some casualties. Some players fail to get a chair in time and are out of the game. The game then goes on without them. The economy eventually recovers. But a depression is a different game entirely...

"All-Time-Highs"

"...central bankers seem to view elevated security valuations as “wealth.” The longer this fallacy persists, the worse the subsequent fallout will be. I have little doubt that future generations will look at the reckless arrogance of today’s central bankers no differently than we view speculators in the South Sea Bubble and the Dutch Tulip-mania. Unfortunately, there is no mechanism by which historically-informed pleas of “no, stop, don’t!” will penetrate their dogmatic conceit. Nor can we change the psychology of investors."

UK Fund Managers Start Dumping Properties, Admit "Real Estate Needed Re-Pricing"

The uncomfortable moment of truth has arrived for property funds in the UK (and their investors). Following the initial tumble of the post-Brexit dominoes - eight major funds so far either gating redemptions or forcing massive haircuts on to investors who want out - contagion concerns even woke up Britain's regulators (and central bank) as fears of Bear-Stearns-esque forced liquidations spread; and now, as The FT reports, that is what has just started.

Only 15% Of S&P Names Are Making New Highs

"Everything is awesome" is the new narrative. How can it not be with stocks at record highs (just like they were in 2007 after Bear Stearsn liquidated two funds)? The only problem is, only 15% of S&P 500 members are at 52-week highs - less than half the 40% of names at a peak when the S&P 500 first breached 2007's record high in 2013.