Bear Stearns

The New New 'Deal' - "Markets Are Too Important To Be Left To Investors"

In the same way that FDR had an existential political interest in generating inflation and preventing volatility in the US labor market, so does the US Executive branch today (regardless of what party holds the office) have an existential political interest in generating inflation and preventing volatility in the US capital markets. Transforming Wall Street into a political utility was an afterthought for FDR; today the relative importance of the labor markets and capital markets have completely switched positions. Today, the quote would be "markets are too important to be left to investors."

Here Comes The Big Flush - Recession Pending, Fed "Put" Ending

If it sounds like history repeating itself, it most surely is.  The coming recession will again obliterate the sell side hockey sticks, which this time started last spring at $135 per share for 2016 and are already being reduced at a lickety-split rate not seen since the fall of 2008. But this time there is one thing that decisively different, and it will make all the difference in the world. As will be reinforced once again by the post-meeting contretemps on Wednesday, the Fed has painted itself into a deathly corner and is utterly out of dry powder. It has nothing left but to hint at the prospect of negative interest rates. And that will be usher in its thundering demise.

Is This The End Of CNBC As We Know It?

Something "disturbing" has emerged for financial pundits whose only job is to appear on CNBC, Fox Business or Bloomberg TV and to present their recurring daily permabullish view while pocketing a commission in exchange for the (almost) free advertising: a proposal which would hold them accountable for their recommendations. The result: an industry-wide panic about a post "fiduciary rule" world in which talking heads on CNBC can't simply disappear for a few months after saying that "Bear Stearns is fine" days before the bank spontaneously combusts.

Mitt Romney Is The Real Super-Fraud: Here's The Proof, Chapter And Verse

"...the GOP establishment’s putative “jobs” candidate from 2012 was never really a businessman at all. Willard M. Romney is no expert on shiny things on a hill. The country would be far better served if he would get his dimming light back under a bushel where it belongs."

CNBC Market Pros Vs The 5 Year Olds

"Now I’ll give the Steve Liesmans and Mark Zandi’s of the world credit for their relentless rambling about the Fed’s omnipotence and Fischer’s brilliance but sometimes just a little common sense is really all you need. Let me give you an example. I provided a simple visual to a group of 5 yr olds to see what sheer instinctive common sense would make of it. All of the children separately arrived at the same conclusion."

Deranged Central Bankers Are Blowing Up The World

The fiat currency system, fractional reserve banking fraud, insane Keynesian fiscal policies, and consumer debt based consumption economy are mathematically unsustainable, so they won’t be sustained. The world is about to sit down to a banquet of consequences, served by deranged central bankers.

Banking On A Bounce? Jamie Dimon Vs The Credit Market

Based on the chart of the KBW Bank Index, Jamie Dimon’s decision to purchase shares of JPMorgan may have been well timed... but the credit markets have a very different perspective on what happens next.

25 Years Of Fed Fueled M&A - The Enabling Of A Banking Oligopoly

Between 1990 and 2010, eventually 37 banks would become JP Morgan Chase, Bank of America, Wells Fargo, and Citigroup. The “Big Four” retail banks in the United States collectively hold 45% of all customer bank deposits for a total of $4.6 trillion... as the biggest got biggest-er all thanks to the very visible hand of The Fed's free money.

Proving Wall Street Strategists Are "Full Of Bull"

How overoptimistic are Wall Street forecasts year in and year out? On average, forecasts were wildly bullish, even with the gains in recent years with results no better than a coin toss as to whether the S&P came in above or below the average forecast. Nonetheless, every year had one thing in common: Not once did a consensus predict a down year.