• Gold Standard I...
    07/24/2014 - 01:47
    There is confusion over what legal tender law does. It doesn't force merchants to accept dollars under threat of imprisonment. It attacks lender, by granting debtors a right to repay in dollars.

Belgium

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Frontrunning: August 13





  • U.S. Regulator Subpoenas Banks Over Long Warehouse Queues (BBG)
  • Apple Said to Prepare Holiday Refresh of IPhones to IPads (BBG)
  • Fed's Yellen Says Stance on Banks Hardened (WSJ)
  • Mexico opens up its energy sector (FT)
  • Spin: Greek GDP marks gradual deceleration of recession (FT) ... spin aside, it dropped 4.6%, and in reality, probably over 10%
  • Made-in-Canada Solution For BlackBerry Avoids Nortel Fate (BBG)
  • America's Farm-Labor Pool Is Graying (WSJ)
  • Video of 'lame' cattle stirs new concern over growth drugs (Reuters)
  • Paulson Bid for Steinway Trumps Kohlberg Offer (WSJ)
  • Egyptian government yet to decide on pro-Mursi vigils (Reuters)
 
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Americans are Now Traveling Overseas For Surgery





There was a time when wealthy foreigners would frequently travel all the way to these United States in order to receive top notch medical attention. Fast forward a decade or two, and all we hear about now is how it is us Americans being forced abroad in order to receive affordable care. From a hip and knee implant cartel of five companies, kickbacks to surgeons, salespeople in the operating room, massive bureaucratic red tape and rampant price gouging, in complete contrast to the Hippocratic Oath; it is perhaps no surprise that "the list price of a total hip implant increased nearly 300 percent from 1998 to 2011."

 
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Chinese and Koreans Keep EU Property Afloat





We are told that the Chinese do not have any money left, that the coffers are empty and that they will have to go the same way as the US and start printing presses rolling along so that the banks end up flush again and the economy rebounds.

 
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Acronymapalooza: GDP, FOMC, ADP, PMI On Deck





As readers are well aware by now, at 8:30 am today we get to see the rewriting of US GDP history back to 1929 with the revisions from the BEA. It’s a big last day of July with the Fed meeting coming after the GDP release. For GDP, real growth is expected to be as low as 1.0% in Q2. Opinions vary widely on today’s GDP number with one major US investment bank’s estimate as low as 0.2%, a number of bulge bracket banks at 0.5% while there are also plenty of economists above 1.5%. It is not news to anyone that nominal GDP is very low at the moment - especially in a world of nosebleed high debts - and today could see this have a 1-handle YoY (and at best a 2-handle) - a level not even normally seen at the depths of most recessions.

 
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The Government "Revises" 84 Years Of Economic History This Week





Don't like how high debt-to-GDP figures are? Revise 'em. Unhappy at the post-'recovery' growth rates? Revise 'em. Disappointed at the pace of economic improvement in the last decade or two compared to the rest of the world? Revise 'em. This week "we are essentially rewriting economic history" as the BEA is set to revise GDP data from as far back as 1929. The 'adjustments' to account for intangibles (that best known of micro- accounting fudge factors) and as we noted previously in great detail, will increase GDP by around $500 billion. Of course, these changes are defended aggressively (just as the hedonic adjustments to inflation calculations 'make perfect sense') as GDP will now reflect spending on research, development, and copyrights as investment - and reflect pension deficits for the first time (think of all that potential future GDP from massive pension deficits now). With Q2 GDP growth estimates set for a dismal 1.1%, expectations are for the short-term economic data to be revised upwards (and with any luck the great recession never happened at all).

 
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Eric Sprott On Central Banks, Bullion Banks and the Physical Gold Market Conundrum





The recent decline in gold prices and the drain from physical ETFs have been interpreted by the media as signaling the end of the gold bull market. However, our analysis of the supply and demand dynamics underlying the gold market does not support this thesis. In our view, the bullion banks’ fractional gold deposit system is testing its limits. Too much paper gold exists for the amount of physical gold available. Demand from emerging markets, who do not settle for paper gold, has perturbed the status quo. Thus, our recommendation to investors is the following: empty unallocated gold accounts and redeem your gold in physical form (while you still can).

 
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Why The EU Has Failed





It has all gone belly up if we look at the EU and we are honest. Yes, they might be trying to paper of the cracks and yes they might be shoving some super strong glue in their to stop everyone pulling in different directions, but if they are really truthful about it, the EU28 (now that Croatia has become a member since July 1st 2013)

 
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Guest Post: Europe's Precarious Banks Will Determine The Future





It is easy to get the impression that the naysayers are wrong on Europe. After all the predictions of Armageddon, ten-year government bond yields for Spain and Italy fell to the 4% level, France which is retreating into old-fashioned socialism was able to borrow at about 2%, and one of the best performing bond investments has been until recently – wait for it – Greek government bonds! Admittedly, bond yields have risen from those lows, but so have they everywhere. It is clear when one stands back from all the usual euro-rhetoric that as a threat to the global financial system it is a case of panic over. Well, no. Europe has not recapitalized its banking system the way the US has (at great taxpayer expense, of course). Therefore, it is much more vulnerable. Where European governments and regulators have failed to make their banks more secure it is because they tied their strategy to growth arising from an economic recovery that has failed to materialize. The reality is that the Eurozone GDP levels are only being supported at the moment by the consumption of savings; in orther words, the consumption of personal wealth. Wealth that is not infinite; and held by those not likely to tolerate footing the bill for much longer.

 
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Frontrunning: June 26





  • Scalpel in Hand, Chinese Premier Li Stirs Reform Hopes (Reuters)
  • Obama Sets Conditions for Keystone Pipeline Go-Ahead (FT)
  • World’s Most Indebted Households Face Rate Pain (BBG)
  • SAC Probers Weighing 'Willful Blindness' Tack (WSJ)
  • Draghi Says ECB Ready to Act, Calls for Investment Over Tax (BBG)
  • U.S. Tops China for Foreign Investment (WSJ)
  • Basel Presses Ahead With Plans to Limit Bank Borrowing (FT)
  • Gillard Ousted as Australia PM by Rival Rudd (FT)
  • Japan Economic Strength Will Show in Stocks, Nishimura Says (BBG)
 
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European Stocks Plunge To Seven-Month Lows; Banks In Bear Market





The narrow EuroStoxx 50 index is now at its lowest in over seven months (-5.4% year-to-date and -12.5% from its highs in May) and the broader EuroStoxx 600 is also flailing lower. The European bank stocks pushed down to their lowest in almost 10 months and are now in bear market territory - down 22.5% from their highs. Spain and Italy are now testing their lowest level in 9 months. While the sovereign bond market had been relatively quiet last week, it started to catch down to stocks today with Portugal, Spain, Italy, and Belgium all giving up significant parts of their Draghi-promise gains. Europe's VIX broke above 26% for the first time in almost 10 months. Think that there should be a flight-to-safety? Think again - Swiss 2Y rates spiked to 10.1bps (remember it was -44.5bps in August 2012) - their highest in 22 months. EURUSD smashed lower in the pre-open US and then oscillated higher in the most mechanically odd manner for the rest of the EU day...

 
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"A Classic Minsky Trap Appears To Have Developed"





For the past several years, a firmly entrenched psyche of ‘win-win’ for risk-taking behavior has dominated. The thinking has been that the Fed would either help achieve a sustained recovery (allowing distorted prices to be validated by economic fundamentals), or the FOMC would provide more price-boosting liquidity. Now, faith in this proposition is slowly being eroded. Global central banks have collectively provided $11 trillion in liquidity over the past several years. The initial moves were taken to spark domestic demand, but some recent external actions have been retaliatory in nature, implemented as a means to influence currency levels. These new forms of hostilities are indications that the external ramifications of QE policies may no longer be passively tolerated.

 
Marc To Market's picture

US Jobs maybe Overshadowed by Market Unwind





US jobs data is important, but other forces are at work that seem more powerful.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

The Most Over/Under-Valued Housing Markets In The World





House prices - with respect to both levels and changes - differ widely across OECD countries. As a simple measure of relative rich or cheapness, the OECD calculates if the price-to-rent ratio (a measure of the profitability of owning a house) and the price-to-income ratio (a measure of affordability) are above their long-term averages, house prices are said to be overvalued, and vice-versa. There are clearly some nations that are extremely over-valued and others that are cheap but as SocGen's Albert Edwards notes, it is the UK that stands out as authorities have gone out of their way to prop up house prices - still extremely over-valued (20-30%) - despite being at the epicenter of the global credit bust. Summing up the central bankers anthem, Edwards exclaims: "what makes me genuinely really angry is that burdening our children with more debt to buy ridiculously expensive houses is seen as a solution to the problem of excessively expensive housing." It's not different this time.

 
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It's A "0.6%" World: Who Owns What Of The $223 Trillion In Global Wealth





Back in 2010 we started an annual series looking at the (re)distribution in the wealth of nations and social classes. What we found then (and what the media keeps rediscovering year after year to its great surprise) is that as a result of global central bank policy, the rich got richer, and the poor kept on getting poorer, even though as we predicted the global political powers would, at least superficially, seek to enforce policies that aimed to reverse this wealth redistribution from the poor to the rich (a doomed policy as the world's legislative powers are largely in the lobby pocket of the world's wealthiest who needless to say are less then willing to enact laws that reduce their wealth and leverage). Now that the topic of wealth distribution (or rather concentration) is once again in vogue, below we present the latest such update looking at a global portrait of household wealth. The bottom line: 29 million, or 0.6% of those with any actual assets under their name, own $87.4 trillion, or 39.3% of all global assets.

 
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