Bob Pisani

World's Top Investors "Ring Alarm" At All Time Market Highs

The big rally in stocks and bonds has some of the world’s top money managers putting up warning signs. Laurence Fink and Howard Marks joined the likes of Bill Gross and Jeffrey Gundlach cautioning that buyers may be getting ahead of themselves... by about 25%.

Greater Fools Have Stormed The Casino

Since last Friday’s phony jobs report the casino has become so unhinged that analysis is beside the point. It is not surprising at all that the robo-machines are now gunning for the 2200 point on the S&P 500 charts. That’s what they do. What defies explanation, however, is that the several dozen humans left on Wall Street who apparently talk to Bob Pisani are actually attempting to rationalize this “breakout” of, well, madness.

Despite Rising Market, "Smart Money" Sells For Record 17th Consecutive Week

Another week, and another quiet exodus by the "smart money" clients of Bank of America (hedge funds, institutionals and private money), who collective sold $218 million in stocks, the 17th consecutive week of selling completely oblivious of a market that "wants to go higher" according to Bob Pisani, and as BofA notes, "continuing the longest uninterrupted selling streak in our data history (since '08)."

HSBC’s London Gold Vault: Is This Gold’s Secret Hiding Place?

HSBC’s main gold vault in London regularly comes under the media spotlight for a number of reasons. These reasons include: a) the HSBC London vault stores a very large amount of gold on behalf of the well-known SPDR Gold Trust (GLD); b) along with the Bank of England vaults and JP Morgan vault, the HSBC vault is one of the 3 largest gold vaults in London; c) the location of the HSBC vault in London is not publicised and so the secrecy creates intrigue; d) HSBC every so often throws out some visual or audio-visual media bait about the vault, most famously in the case of CNBC’s Bob Pisani; Despite all of the above, no one seems to have ever tried to figure out where this gold vault is actually located. Until now.

Weekend Reading: It's Probably A Trap

The “bullish case” is currently built primarily on “hope.” Hope the economy will improve in the second half of the year; Hope that earnings will improve in the second half of the year; Hope that oil prices will trade higher even as supply remains elevated; Hope the Fed will not raise interest rates this year; Hope that global Central Banks will “keep on keepin’ on.”  Hope that the US Dollar doesn’t rise; Hope that interest rates remain low; Hope that high-yield credit markets remain stable.

When "Mother's Milk" Runs Dry

For the third time in six months, US equity markets have exuberantly decoupled from earnings expectations thanks, in large part, to jawboning and coordination from Central Banks. With stocks near record highs despite the earnings "mother's milk" expectations tumbling, one can't help but wonder, as CNBC's Bob Pisani did this morning, given the comments from Evans, Lockhart, and Bullard, "It's possible the Fed has seen the market reaction and become alarmed by the complacency."

Spot The Odd One Out (Again)

Stocks are rallying "and they should" according to CNBC's Bob Pisani... but nothing else is playing along.