• GoldCore
    07/30/2014 - 18:58
    “But long term...and economic law says, if you keep printing a lot of paper money, the value of the dollar and currency will go down, and things and most prices will go up and indeed gold always goes...

Borrowing Costs

Tyler Durden's picture

Futures Dragged Down By Visa, Amazon Despite USDJPY Levitation





Following yesterday's disappointing results by Visa, which is the largest DJIA component accounting for 8% of the index and which dropped nearly 3%, while AMZN's 10% tumble has weighed heavily on NASDAQ futures, it has been up to the USDJPY to push US equity futures from dropping further, which it has done admirably so far with the tried and true levitation pump taking place just as Europe opened. One thing to keep in mind: yesterday the CME quietly hiked ES and NQ margins by 6% and 11% respectively. A modest warning shot across the bow of what may be coming down the line?

 
Tyler Durden's picture

5 Reasons Why The Market Won't Crash Or Will





One of the biggest mistakes that investors make is falling prey to cognitive biases that obfuscate rising investment risks. Here are 5 counter-points to the main memes in the market currently...

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Is Yellen Being Misled By Employment Statistics?





The actual state of employment in the U.S. is likely far weaker than the economic statistics currently suggest. If this is indeed the case, it creates a potential for policy mistakes that could have negative consequences to both the economy and the financial markets.

 
EconMatters's picture

The Fed Needs to Raise Rates Now!





Janet Yellen is always one step behind.  If people start to ask you "Are you fat?", then you ARE fat!

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Analyzing The Impact Of Fed Rate Hikes On Markets & Economy





There has been much discussion as of late about the end of the current quantitative easing program and the beginning of the Federal Reserve "normalizing" interest rates. The primary assumption is that as interest rates normalize, the financial markets will continue to rise as economic growth strengthens. While this certainly seems like a logical assumption, is it really the case?

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Krugman’s Bathtub Economics





It is fortunate that Paul Krugman writes a column for New York Times readers who want the party line sans all the economist jargon and regression equations. So here is the plain English gospel straight from the Keynesian oracle: The US economy is actually a giant bathtub which is constantly springing leaks. Accordingly, the route to prosperity everywhere and always is for agencies of the state - especially its central banking branch - to pump “demand” back into the bathtub until its full to the brim. Simple.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Free Lunch Over? Regulators Pressure Banks To Admit Balance Sheets Aren't Riskless





Global banking regulators are considering new measures that would make it harder for banks to understate the riskiness of their assets. The BIS decision, as WSJ reports, to end the long-standing treatment of all government bonds as automatically risk-free, is clearly being priced into European banking stocks (as we noted here). Since the financial crisis European banks have backed up the truck on their domestic sovereign bond issuance (most especially Italy and Spain) - draining every fund to buy over EUR1.8 trillion of these 'risk-free' assets. However, that party is potentially ending as The Basel Committee panel is looking at barring banks from assigning very low risk levels to certain types of assets, a tactic some lenders have used to reduce their capital requirements; which could force banks to raise billions of dollars in extra capital.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Meet Decheng Mining: The Chinese Firm Which Rehypothecated Its Metal (At Least) Three Times





For all the theoretical explanations about China's profound commodity rehypothecation problems, the one thing that was missing was an empirical case study framing just how substantial the problem is. After all, it is one thing to say banks expect "X millions in losses", but totally different to see the rehypothecation dominoes falling in practice. Today, courtesy of Bloomberg we got just such an example.

Meet Decheng Mining.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Up To $80 Billion Gold-Backed Loans Are Falsified, Chinese Auditor Warns





As the probe into alleged fraud at Qingdao continues to escalate (with liquidity needs growing more and more evident as Chinese money-market rates surge), Bloomberg reports that China’s chief auditor discovered 94.4 billion yuan ($15.2 billion) of loans backed by falsified gold transactions, in "the first official confirmation of what many people have suspected for a long time - that gold is widely used in Chinese commodity financing deals." As much as 1,000 tons of gold may have been used in lending and leasing deals in China and Goldman reports that up to $80 billion false-loans may involve gold. As one analyst noted, this was unlikely to have a significant impact on the underlying demand for gold in China and as we have pointed out before, any unwind of the Gold CFDs would lead to buying back of 'paper' gold hedges and implicitly a rise in prices.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Frontrunning: June 20





  • Must be an early winter: Housing Falters as Forecasters See U.S. Sales Dropping  (BBG)
  • China Property Failures Seen as $33 Billion in Trusts Due (BBG)
  • Polish Prime Minister Says Recording Scandal May Trigger Early Election (WSJ)
  • Iraqi forces ready push after Obama offers advisers (Reuters)
  • Priorities: U.S. cuts aid to Uganda, cancels military exercise over anti-gay law (Reuters)
  • Kurds' Takeover of Iraqi City of Kirkuk Strengthens Their Hand (WSJ)
  • U.S. says government lab workers possibly exposed to anthrax (Reuters)
  • Netflix Up 21% With Tesla: The best U.S. stocks this month are ones that just a few months ago were the biggest losers (BBG)
  • Architects of Iraq Invasion Return to Blame Obama (BBG)
  • Nato claims Moscow funding anti-fracking groups (FT)
  • Lawmakers Skeptical GM Bosses Were Unaware of Defect (WSJ)
  • Corinthian Colleges Warns of Possible Shutdown (WSJ)
  • Taiwan's Quanta to start mass production of Apple's smartwatch in July (Reuters)
 
Tyler Durden's picture

Treasury Bulls Beware: A Cautionary Tale From Punk'd British Bond Traders





Bad data, don't worry, the central bank's got your back; Good data, don't worry, the central bank promised to stay easier for longer and longer (no matter how good things appear from the data). That's the meme that has driven the short-end of the world's largest bond markets to record lows. And then, just as the world's bond traders think they have the central banks understood, the Bank of England drops a tape-bomb...

 
GoldCore's picture

Historic ECB Gamble, Looks Set To Print Euros And Debase Currency Versus Gold





Der Spiegel deemed it was the “end of capitalism”, while Die Welt described Mr Draghi as Europe’s Bismarck and as a near autocrat beyond control. Throughout history, currency debasement has been the easy option for emperors, kings, queens and governments. It is the easy option of central banks and of Goldman's Draghi today.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

5 Things To Ponder: The Central Bank Edition





This past week has been all about "anticipation." The markets made little headway during the first half of the week as traders waited in an almost breathless anticipation of the announcement from the European Central Bank. When the news was finally received, investors were initially disappointed but David Tepper stepped into the fray with his ever bullish optimism. The more we read, the clearer it becomes that the world's Central Banks have become caught in a "liquidity trap" which is entirely based on circular logic... Central banks must create asset bubbles in the hopes of stimulating economic activity. When the bubble eventually pops the economic activity evaporates which requires the creation of another asset bubble.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

No, The Economy Wasn't Built On Consumer Debt





Steve Liesman unleashed a torrent of abuse when he claimed recently that "This Country Was Built On Consumer Debt" Of course, Steve's comments really are of little surprise. With the average American still living well beyond their means, the reality is that economic growth will remain mired at lower levels as savings continue to diverted from productive investment into debt service. Furthermore, with the Federal Reserve and the Administration actively engaged in creating an artificial housing recovery, and wealth effect from increasing asset prices, it is likely that another bubble is being created. This has never ended well. The concern is that without a reversion of debt to more sustainable levels the attainment of stronger, and more importantly, self-sustaining economic growth could be far more elusive than currently imagined.

 
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