Borrowing Costs

Tyler Durden's picture

European Banks Are Paid To Borrow For First Time Ever As Euribor Goes Negative





Mario Draghi said this week that the transmission channels for European Q€ were opening up and crowed how well his cunning plan was working (by well we assume he means stocks are up). Today we get the ultimate test of that 'transmission' as 3-Month EURIBOR fell below 0.00% for the first time ever (likely wreaking havoc on European derivative pricing models). In English that means banks are being paid to borrow from one another in the interbank money-markets (which sounds a lot like a 'glut' of excess cash) seemingly confirming ICMA's de Vidts fears: "We are scared about the [repo] market freezing," as the ECB is "driving without headlights in the dark." Of course this is yet another disturbing distortion on the heels of homeowners being paid to take out mortgages...

 
Tyler Durden's picture

China Floats QE Trial Balloon, PBoC May Launch LTROs





China may allow commercial banks to swap the local government bonds they purchase for cash loans from the PBoC, WSJ reports. The country's local governments are laboring under a debt load that totals 35% of GDP and much of it carries relatively high interest rates. A new program will allow localities to swap a portion of that debt for lower-yielding bonds. If China does indeed roll out an LTRO-like initiative, the banks which buy the new local government bonds would then be able to pledge them as collateral for cash from the central bank.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

The Global Liquidity Squeeze Has Begun





The entire global financial system resembles a colossal spiral of debt. Just about all economic activity involves the flow of credit in some way, and so the only way to have “economic growth” is to introduce even more debt into the system. Unfortunately, any system based on debt is going to break down eventually, and there are signs that it is starting to happen once again.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

SEC Reaches "Appropriate" Settlement With Freddie Mac Execs Who Will Pay Nothing And Receive No Punishment





Three former Freddie Mac executives who understated the amount of subprime exposure on the GSE's book by a factor of 28 came to terms with the SEC today on a settlement which imposes fees no one has to pay and "limitations on future behavior" that "will not limit [anyone] in any practical way."

 
Tyler Durden's picture

The Changing World Of Work 2: Financialization = Insecurity





The Millennial Generation, if we're to believe various polls, aspires to either make boatloads of money on Wall Street, or secure a can't-be-fired job in the government. Given the dominance of finance and an economic backdrop of rising insecurity, these are rational choices. But all those Millennials hoping to work for Goldman Sachs does raise a question: when did playing financial games become so much more profitable than producing goods and services?

 

 
EconMatters's picture

GE Resorts To Financial Engineering to Boost Stock Price





GE stock is down almost 13% over the last 7 years, and this is with record shares being taken off the market.  However, Jeff Immelt thinks he has a solution for this problem after 15 years at the helm of GE. 

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Gundlach Lieutenant Says Risk/Reward In US Corporate Credit Most Unattractive Proposition Ever





“In my 30-year career, it’s one of the most unattractive risk-return propositions that I’ve seen,” DoubleLine's Bonnie Baha says. Between abysmally low yields, heightened rate sensitivity heading into a rate hike cycle, and balance sheet re-leveraging on the part of US corporations, it’s a bad time to be betting on corporate credit.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Bonds Are Right! DoubleLine's Gundlach Warns Fed "Has Been Wrong For So Long... Offers No Value"





History is on the market’s side, says DoubleLine's Jeff Gundlach, noting the Fed’s forecast for how much benchmark rates will rise is still too high, even after central bankers lowered their estimates last month. BlackRock’s Jeffrey Rosenberg says the bond market’s too complacent and is poised for a correction, claiming The Fed has "a tremendous ability" to send bond yields higher. But as Bloomberg reports, "if the burden of proof is on anybody, it’s on the Fed," and for now, as Gundlach exclaims, The Fed has "been wrong for so long," that their forecasts have been literally of no value, "the market’s pricing has been closer."

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Frontrunning: April 6





  • Political Battle Ramps Up Over Iran Nuclear Deal (WSJ)
  • Greece moves to quell default fears, pledges to meet 'all obligations' (Reuters)
  • Isolated Greece pivots east to Russia, China and Iran. But will it work? (Telegraph)
  • Frustrated officials want Greek premier to ditch Syriza far left (FT)
  • Greek political unrest and deepening debt crisis fuel talk of snap election (Guardian)
  • Rand Paul’s Challenge: Charting His Own Course (WSJ)
  • In Greenspan Conundrum Redux, Odds Are on Bond Traders’ Side (BBG)
  • Yemen's Aden suffers amid clashes, aid deliveries delayed (Reuters)
  • Record Gasoline Output to Curb Biggest U.S. Oil Glut in 85 Years (BBG)
 
Tyler Durden's picture

If We're Going To Borrow Against The Future, Let's Borrow To Invest





We are at an important juncture as a global society: either we immediately prioritize a new trajectory focused on creating a positive, functional future or -- by continuing the consumptive, extractive, exploitative status quo -- we will default into a nasty nightmare. What will determine which future path we take is our collective narrative. It's the story we tell ourselves -- who we are, what we value.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Companies Go All-In Before Rate Hike, Issue Record Debt In Q1





Not only did Q1 mark a record quarter for issuance, March supply also hit a record at $143 billion, tying the total put up in May of 2008. It should come as no surprise that Q1 was a banner quarter for corporate debt issuance as struggling oil producers tapped HY markets to stay afloat and companies scrambled to max out the stock-buyback-via-balance-sheet re-leveraging play before the Fed hike rates.

 
Sprout Money's picture

Here's Why Investment Banks Love The ECB’s QE Program





According to Citigroup, the revenues from trading fixed income securities has been decreasing since the end of the global financial crisis, but this trend might very well be reverted soon as investors are desperately trying to protect their assets from erosion.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

QE For The People - What Could Go Wrong?





A number of economists have proposed the implementation of what has been dubbed "QE for the people." They seem to prefer to apply the principle "When in trouble, double." Given the massive mistakes which were made by central banks from Weimar to Bernanke and the relentless attempts to use the printing press to finance governments, it probably shouldn't take much to convince people of alternatives, and not more of the same, right?

 
Tyler Durden's picture

The Bubble Machine Is Complete: Soaring Stocks Push Investors Into Bonds Whose Issuers Buy More Stocks





As JPM notes, soaring equity prices have had the effect of altering investors’ asset allocations, effectively tipping the balance towards equities even as money flows into bond funds. "The more equity prices increase, driven by either hedge funds or investors with low equity allocations, such as Japanese pension funds the higher the incentive by other investors who are already very overweight equities to buy bonds to prevent their bond allocation from falling too low."

 
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