Borrowing Costs

Tyler Durden's picture

Spain Yield Back Above 7%





Summit full life: One week. Literally. Last Friday morning speculation that Germany had "caved" to Mario Monti, somehow allowing beggars to be choosers, and would allow an unconditional and IMF-free rescue of Spain and Italy while the seniority of the ESM was eliminated, sending the Spanish 10 Year yield to under 6.2%. The same security is now back over 7%, where it was just before the summit, as Finland and Holland (or half of Europe's AAA-rated countries), and even Germany, made it quite clear, as we said all along, that stripping seniority of a piece of debt is far more complex than saying one wants to do it in a Memorandum of Understanding. The other thing pushing Spanish spreads wider was German FinMin spokesman Kotthaus saying that no decision on Spain can be taken on Monday as there is no Troika report on Spain bank aid yet, and that the European bailout activation, which was supposed to begin on July 9th, may be delayed until July 20. At that point it will likely be delayed again, only this time GSPGs may be trading wider than their lifetime highs of 7.285%. Finally, adding insult to Mario Monti "victory" is that Merkel's popularity rating just hit a multi-year high. So: who was last week's summit "winner" again?

 
Tyler Durden's picture

The Next Imminent Bailout: Eminent Domain





It seems that governmental efforts to save the underwater and ineligible homeowner from his own fate are reaching fever pitch. Not only do we hear today of the up to $300mm in Agriculture Department Rural Housing Service loans that may have financed ineligible projects or borrowers with a high potential inability to repay the loans; but yesterday's WSJ reports on the growing call for 'eminent-domain' powers to be used by local government officials in California to stop the "housing bust's public blight on their city". In yet another get-out-of-jail-free card, the officials (helped by a friendly local hedge-fund / mortgage-provider) want to use the government's ability to forcibly acquire property to remove underwater homes, restructure the mortgage (cut principal), and hand back the home to the previously unable to pay dilemma-ridden homeowner. As PIMCO's Scott Simon puts it: "I don't see how you could find it anything other than appalling", as this would crush property prices further and drive up borrowing costs. As we noted earlier, until these mal-investments are marked to market, there will be no useful growth in our credit-bound economy but transferring wealth to the 'mal'-investor seems like a terrible idea.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Central Banks Helpless As Denmark Goes NIRP, Cuts Deposit Rate To NEGATIVE 0.2%





A few days ago we noted that the ECB may well be contemplating the monetary neutron bomb, which would see it lower rates to below zero, ushering in a Negative Interest Rate Policy. Today, Mario Draghi cut such speculation short promising the ECB has not discussed this. Yet one bank which certainly has is the Danish Central Bank, which just lowered its Discount Rate to 0%, joining China, England, the ECB, and, of course, Kenya in easing, but also went one step further and cut its deposit rate to negative 0.2%. Keep a note of this: NIRP is coming to a central bank, and shortly thereafter to a bank deposit branch, near you very soon.

 
EconMatters's picture

Will EUR/USD Reach Parity By Year End?





ECB is running out of options. Germany can't afford any more bailouts.  Euro is overvalued compared to the dollar.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

The Fed And LIBOR - The Biggest Manipulator Of Them All





The Fed does everything it can to keep LIBOR low. The Fed cannot affect LIBOR directly, but in general LIBOR trades in line with Fed Funds.  You can see that historically as Fed Funds was changed, LIBOR responded appropriately. That all started to break down in 2007 and re-ignited in the late summer of 2008 and peaked after Lehman and AIG. The Fed was blatantly clear that it wanted borrowing costs to go down.  They had the obvious tool of reducing Fed Funds to virtually zero, but when LIBOR didn't follow, the Fed took further action. The Fed has done a lot and trying to control LIBOR as a key borrowing rate is one of the things they have worked on, both directly and indirectly.

 
Phoenix Capital Research's picture

Germany Will Choose to Bail on the EU Rather Than Bail It Out





Germany will leave the Euro the moment that the EU Crisis spreads to France.  At that point any discussion of EU bailouts is pointless, as the very countries needing aid (France, Italy, Spain, and Greece) account for 53% of the ESM’s funding. 

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Not So Fast: Finland And Holland Will Block ESM Bond Buying





While the bailout ball is in the German constitutional court, which has 8 days to decide, and potentially put the entire timeline of Europe's bailout in limbo should it cogitate longer than July 9 without handing over the ESM law to the president, in effect forcing the country into a Euro bailout referendum, it is easy to forget that there are other AAA-rated countries in Europe, which also have a say as to who gets bailed out. As of this morning, it appears that Germany may increasingly be the only one left footing the insolvency bill as both Finland and Holland said "Ei" and "Nee" respectively.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Barclays Chairman Is Lie-borgate's First Victim





Three weeks ago we mocked, rightfully so, the utter joke that is Liebor, which had been unchanged for just over 3 months. Nobody cared, certainly not the British Banker Association. This was not the first time: our first allegations of Liebor fraud and manipulation started over three years ago. There were others too. Nobody certainly cared back then. Now, in the aftermath of the Barclays lawsuit, and "those" e-mails, everyone suddenly cares. And a few days after the first public exposure of Lie-borgate, the first victim has been claimed: as numerous sources report, Barclays' Chairman Marcus Agius wil step down immediately. From the WSJ: "Political and investor pressure has mounted on the management of U.K.-based Barclays since the settlement was announced Wednesday. The announcement of Mr. Agius's departure could come as soon as Monday, said one of the people. Mr. Agius, 65 years old, a British-Maltese banker who formerly worked at Lazard Ltd., has led the bank since 2007, steering Barclays through the 2008 financial crisis and avoiding the direct state bailouts that were needed by many of its global peers." While the sacrifice of a scapegoat is expected, what we don't get is why the Chairman: after all by the time Agius became Chair of the British bank, the bulk of the Libor fixing alleged in the FSA lawsuit had already happened. And of course, with Bob Diamond having succeeded John Varley as CEO in 2010, one can easily claim that in this first (of many) confirmed Liebor transgression there really is nobody at fault who can be held accountable. Of course, Barclays is merely the first of many. We fully expect Lieborgate to spread not only to other British BBA member banks, but soon to jump across the Atlantic, where CEOs who have been with their banks for the duration of the entire Libor-fixing term will soon find themselves under the same microscope.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Is The Bank Of England About To Be Dragged Into Lie-borgate, And Which US Bank Is Next





While the Lieborgate scandal gathers steam not so much because of people's comprehension of just what is at stake here (nothing less than the fair value of $350 trillion in interest-rate sensitive products as explained in February), but simply courtesy of several very vivid emails which mention expensive bottles of champagne, once again proving that when it comes to interacting with the outside world, banks see nothing but rows of clueless muppets until caught red-handed (at which point they use big words, and speak confidently), the BBC's Robert Peston brings an unexpected actor into the fray: the English Central Bank and specifically Paul Tucker, the man who, unless Goldman's-cum-Canada's Mark Carney or Goldman's Jim O'Neill step up, will replace Mervyn King as head of the BOE.

 
EconMatters's picture

Crude Oil Market: A Perfect Bear Storm Despite the Euro Pop





A confluence of factors is forming a perfect storm for the oil market to face some major headwinds for the next 5 years. 

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Update: Germany Just Said, You Know It, Nein; Eurobeggars Continue To Be Choosers;





Update: NEIN

  • GERMANY WON'T ACCEPT NEW ANTI-CRISIS INSTRUMENTS - GERMAN SOURCE *DJ 

Maybe the Italian football team should have bent over just a little.

* * *

Today's edition of the Eurosummit is over. There was some news, however, as always happens, there is a twist:

  • EU LEADERS HAVE AGREED A GROWTH PACKAGE OF 120 BLN EUROS BUT  ITALY AND SPAIN NOT PREPARED TO SIGN OFF ON IT - EU OFFICIALS - *DJ
  • ITALY WON'T SIGN ONTO GROWTH PACT UNTIL BOND BUYING DEAL

In other words, beggars continue to be choosers, as Italy and Spain will not agree on getting aid (!) until Germany relents on buying their bonds. There was a reason why in the summer of 2011 we said that as the Game Theory equilibrium shifts to defection, he who defects first, defects best. Well, Greece is now leaps and bounds ahead of everyone as the global ponzi unravels. And so the posturing for second place is now on. We can't wait for the official German response, to both this, and to the loss by Italy in Euro2012.

Peak idiocy.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Stocks Don't Even Need A Rumor To Surge Now





Stocks just surged over 1% off their lows on absolutely no news whatsoever. The Merkel news was minutes ago (and how is that in any way positive) and the JPM news is old and irrelevant... This is simply ridiculous... they are on their own from a cross-asset perspective and just touched yesterday's closing VWAP which feels very algo-exit-driven...

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Guest Post: Forget Broccoli





Americans are either celebrating or damning the Supreme Court’s 5-4 ruling that the individual mandate is constitutional. It is puzzling that the individual mandate to purchase healthcare might be deemed unconstitutional when the collective mandate to collect taxes to purchase next-to-everything (including both healthcare and broccoli) has been considered constitutional for the best part of a century. If America wants to overturn current legal norms America needs to elect different politicians. But with a greater and greater welfare-bound population, it seems inevitable that more and more Americans will vote themselves greater and greater quantities of free stuff. What’s stopping Congress from mandating that patriotic Americans with any spare cash dump it into government securities (or even flagging equities)? One day, Atlas may shrug. Until that day, Congress just acquired a powerful new funding tool.

 
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