• Monetary Metals
    01/28/2015 - 00:28
    It’s terrifying how fast the whole Swiss yield curve sank under the waterline of zero. Now even the 15-year bond has negative interest. The franc has reached the end.

Borrowing Costs

Tyler Durden's picture

Overnight Summary: Euro Summit Burnout





Last week, Europe was the source of transitory euphoria on some inexplicable assumption that just because the continent has run out of assets, and the ECB has no choice but to expand "eligible" collateral to include, well, everything, things are fixed and it is safe to buy. Today, it is the opposite. Go figure. Call it pre-eurosummit burnout, call it profit taking on hope and prayer, call it Brian Sack packing up his trading desk (just 5 more days to go), and handing over proper capital markets functioning to a B-grade economist, or best just call it deja vu all over again.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Frontrunning: June 25





  • Merkel Backs Debt Sharing in Germany Amid Closer EU Push (Bloomberg)
  • With a ruling as early as today, here are four health care questions the Supreme Court is asking (CBS)
  • George Soros - Germany’s Reticence to Agree Threatens European Stability (FT)
  • China Stocks Drop to Five-Month Low (Bloomberg)
  • The New Republic of Porn (Bloomberg)
  • That's a costly detached retina: Greek Lenders Postpone Mission to Athens (FT)
  • Spain Asks for Aid as EU Fights Debt Crisis (FT)
  • Wolfgang Münchau - Why Mario Monti Needs to Speak Truth to Power (FT)
  • U.S. Banks Aren’t Nearly Ready for Coming European Crisis (Bloomberg)
  • MPC Member Wants £50bn Easing (FT)
  • India Boosts Foreign Debt Ceiling by $5 Billion to Defend Rupee (Bloomberg)
 
Tyler Durden's picture

Spain Formally Comes A Begging





While the world has known for over two weeks that the Spanish banking system is insolvent and locked out of global liquidity, the country was reticent about formally bowing down to Germany and announcing in proper protocol that it was broke. Until a few hours ago, when Spain's Economy Minister Luis de Guindos Monday sent a letter to Eurogroup President Jean-Claude Juncker, as expected, formally requesting aid to assist with the recapitalization of Spanish banks that need it, the ministry said in a statement. Sadly, at this point we can all just sit back and await for the next Spanish bailout letter demanding more cash, because, as we have explained on several occasions, the ultimate funding need of Spanish banks will be well over €100 billion, as further confirmed overnight by another analysis from Open Europe, which notes the patenly obvious: "Up to mid-2015 Spain faces funding needs of €547.5bn, over half its GDP and a large majority of its debt."

 
Tyler Durden's picture

"One Cannot Operate A Capitalist System If The State Can Borrow At A Negative Cost"





"I could go on and on with other examples, but let’s just get to the point: one cannot operate a capitalist system if the state can borrow at a negative cost. Years of irresponsibly loose monetary policy in the US has led to cheap funding for the US (and other) governments, but difficult credit conditions for the  private sector all around the world. As I underlined in How The World Works, negative real rates leads to misallocation of capital which ends in asset deflation, while simultaneously limiting the capacity for recovery by driving out the private sector.... The Fed has been managed by a bunch of Keynesians who care nothing about the role of the dollar as a reserve currency and who probably believed they were managing the central bank of Belorussia or Zimbabwe!"

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Eric Sprott Presents The Ministry of [Un]Truth





We have no doubt that everyone is tired of bad news, but we are compelled to review the facts: Europe is currently experiencing severe bank runs, budgets in virtually every western country on the planet are out of control, the banking system is running excessive leverage and risk, the costs of servicing the ever-increasing amounts of government debt are rising rapidly, and the economies of Europe, Asia and the United States are slowing down or are in full contraction. There's no sugar coating it and we have to stop listening to politicians and central planners who continue to downplay, obfuscate and flat out lie about the current economic reality. Stop listening to them.

 
Reggie Middleton's picture

BoomBustBlog's Armageddon Puts Become Fashionable At Goldman





Goldman got those positions in last week, just like BoomBustBloggers did, and now its time to tell the muppets to help drive the prices down??? Paranoid conspiracy theory or just plain fact?

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Frontrunning: June 22





  • Mario Monti: We Have a Week to Save the Eurozone (Guardian)
  • Europe Central Bank Prepares to Relax Collateral Rules (WSJ)
  • EU Banks' Risk in Eyes of Beholder: Worry Is That Lenders Are Boosting Gauge of Their Health (WSJ)
  • Europe finally learns about subordination: Bailouts' Creditor Hierarchy Scares Private Bondholders (WSJ)
  • Merkel Isolated in Race for Euro Crisis Solution (Spiegel)
  • Fed’s Re-Twist May Lift Treasury Repurchase Agreement Rates (Bloomberg)
  • China Said to Propose Keeping Limit on Local Government Loans (Bloomberg)
  • Moody’s Downgrade Hits 15 Top Banks (FT)
  • IMF Challenges Berlin’s Crisis Response (FT)
  • Colombia to Auction Rights in 2013 to Gold and Coal, Not Coltan (Bloomberg)
 
Tyler Durden's picture

Europe's Three Ring Circus





First and foremost; nothing is happening in the European Union without the agreement of Germany. They have the gold and they will make the rules regardless of the words bandied about proclaiming brotherly love and the solidarity of the European nations. This is all drivel, just politics and a subject that can be ignored as you concentrate on what is really important. When Germany speaks, on a scale of 1-10 with 10 being the most important; Germany is a 10 and the only 10 on the Continent.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Frontrunning: June 21





  • German court may delay ESM bailout fund ratification (Reuters)
  • New dangers lurk for rudderless Spain (Reuters)
  • SEC Said to Depose SAC’s Cohen in Insider-Trading Probe (Bloomberg)
  • With Europe broke, Asia is Wall Street's new dumb money: Riskier Bets Pitched To Asia's Rising Rich (WSJ)
  • Spain expected to request bank aid after debt test (Reuters)
  • Lawmakers Push for Overhaul of IPO Process (WSJ)
  • Israel: "all options" open after Iran talks fail (Reuters)
  • Canadian housing boom to grind to a halt (Financial Post)
  • Italians Dodge Property Tax in Test for Monti’s Austerity (Bloomberg)
  • ORCL earnings must have been good: Oracle CEO Ellison to Buy Most of Hawaiian Island Lanai (Bloomberg)
 
Tyler Durden's picture

Sentment: Hoping And Praying Bernanke Sees His Shadow And Six More Months Of NEW QE





Everything today is all about the Fed, which at 12:30 pm will release its standard statement. The publication of Fed officials' forecasts and Chairman Bernanke's press conference will follow at 14:00 and 14:15, respectively. Some, like Goldman are convinced the Fed will announce new easing measures, which could take the form of a new LSAP, more Twist as well as a lengthening of short-term rate guidance beyond 2014, potentially going as far as announcing a Flow-based form of QE, while others such as BofA are fairly certain nothing will happen. Then at 2:00 pm the Fed will release its new economic projections, in which it is roundly expected that the Fed will revise its GDP forecasts for 2012 and 2013 lower, and unemployment - higher. Finally at 2:15 pm Bernanke will address Steve Liesman and a few other members of the fawning captured media. By then the market will be either much higher or much lower, although with about 5% of the recent market move driven entirely by pricing in of more QE, the risk is to the downside. In other words the hopium phase is over. It is now make or break for the Fed.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Frontrunning: June 20





  • Prepare for Lehmans (sic) re-run, Bank official warns (Telegraph)
  • Fed Seen Extending Operation Twist While Avoiding Bond Buying (Bloomberg)
  • US Watchdog Hits at ‘Risky’ London (FT)
  • G20 Bid to Cut Cost of Euro Borrowing (FT)
  • Romney Says Rubio Being Examined as Possible Running Mate (Bloomberg)
  • Hollande Says Worth Exploring ESM Bond Buys (Reuters)
  • US Upbeat After Eurozone Debt Crisis Talks (FT)
  • BOJ Members Say Japan Could Be ‘Adversely Affected’ by Europe (Bloomberg)
  • China Steps Said to Grow Bond Market, Add Issuer Scrutiny (Bloomberg)
  • How Asia Will Fare if Europe Cracks (WSJ)
 
Tyler Durden's picture

As Italy Comes Begging For A Semi-Bailout, Germany Says Non-Semi Nein (Without Conditions)





Two days ago, when noting that Italy is on collision course with technical insolvency should its bonds remain at current levels for even one more week, we wrote that "As Italy Hints Of Subordination, Did Rome Just Request A "Semi" Bailout?" Of course, yesterday's big market moving rumor was just this - namely that "supposedly" Germany had agreed to provide the underfunded EFSF and non-existent ESM as ECB SMP replacement vehicles, and implicitly to launch the bailout of not only Spain but also Italy. This turned out to be patently untrue, as we expected, despite speculation having been accepted as fact by various UK newspaper and having taken Europe by a storm of false hope, leading peripheral spreads modestly tighter (and Germany naturally wider). Of course, even if Merkel were to allow the ESM/EFSF to effectively replace the ECB secondary market bond buying, which is what this is all about, nothing will be fixed, and in fact it would lead to even more subordination and more bond selling off of positions which are not held by the ECB or ESM. But that is for the market to digest in 4-6 weeks as it appears nobody still understands how the mechanics of the flawed European rescue mechanism works. In the meantime, now that Italy has tipped its hand, it has only one option: to push full bore demanding that someone, anyone out there buy its bonds. Sadly, Germany just said nein. Again.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

And For Today's Market Ramp Rumor Du Jour We Have...





It has been a while since the Guardian came up with a European "bailout" rumor. Time to change that. In a nutshell: Germany will somehow allow a fund, the ESM, which does not yet even exist, overturn the primary principle of the Eurozone, the no sovereign bailout clause, and use money which has not been funded, to subordinate bondholders across the entire continent (because ESM is priming) and serve as an additional secured lender in addition to the ECB... In other words, the ESM will take place of the ECB's SMP. With the only difference that the ECB can print money, while the unfunded ESM will at best rely on the murky details of repo lending. Same subordination either way, of course.

 
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