Borrowing Costs

BOE Keeps Rates Unchanged, Drops Guidance To Further Rate Cuts, GBP Jumps

In a widely expected announcement, the Bank of England kept it bank rate unchanged at 0.25%, as well as holding it government bond purchases at £435bn and corporate bond purchases at up to £10bn. Among the notable highlights in the report, the BOE said that "monetary policy can respond, in either direction, to changes to the economic outlook", which appears to have pushed sterling higher.

Is ECB 'Omnipotence' "Too Powerful For Any Democracy To Abide"?

The failure of elected politicians to act appropriately has turned central banks into the “only game in town.” And this is turning out to be less a boon to their prestige than a threat to their independence. The ECB, especially, is set to face growing pushback against its independent status, regardless of whether it manages to “save” the EMU. After all, it would have to be quite powerful to succeed – too powerful for any democracy to abide.

Don’t Sweat The Election. The Next Crisis Is Already Baked Into The Cake

From here on out politics are only relevant at the extremes - major war, corruption scandal, martial law etc. Short of that, the fiat currency/fractional reserve banking world has such institutional momentum that it really won’t matter whether Trump is picking on bankers and building his wall or Clinton is protecting Wall Street and raising taxes. Debt will keep soaring as it has under every president since Reagan and jobs will disappear as machines replace people, thus bringing the end of the current system inexorably closer.

Italy Seen More Likely To Exit Eurozone Than Greece; Italian Bond Yields Surge

In an unexpected reversal of (mis)fortune, this morning Sentix writes that the Eurocrisis creeps back into the heads of the investors in a new way: it is no longer Greece, but Italy which is now the country that is most likely to leave the Eurozone within the year from the perspective of the more than 1,000 investors surveyed. "This development underscores the importance of the referendum to the Constitution in Italy on December, 4th."

Global Bond Selloff Resumes; Stocks Rise Following Strong Chinese Data

With October, the worst month for stocks since January, now in the history books S&P futures are eager to telegraph that the streak of five consecutive will end, with a modest gain of 0.3% in overnight trading, coupled with mixed global markets as the global bond selloff returned after strong Chinese economic data prompted concerns about rising global inflation.

Market Trapped As Recession Risk Rises

With the ongoing political circus, weak corporate earnings (considering the massive reductions in expectations since the beginning of the year), Apple and Amazon both missing expectations (which really goes to the heart of the consumer), and consumer sentiment waning, it is surprising the markets are still holding up as well as they are. As long as the markets can maintain support about 2125, the bull market is still in play, but at this point, not by much.

"The Outcome Is Undeniable" - Global Debt Investors Face Reality Of A World Devoid Of Options

A recent, reluctant re-viewing of the film, 'Silence of the Lambs', fed fresh food for thought. The image of captives rejecting their freedom brought to mind another flock of corralled and stunned lambs - bond market investors. They too have been given the opportunity to escape their fate. But so many choose instead to stay. Such is the reality of a world devoid of options, with time ticking ruthlessly by.

Stocks Are On The Wrong Side Of A Rate Hike

The problem with being a contrarian is the determination of where in a market cycle the “herd mentality” is operating. The collective wisdom of market participants is generally “right” during the middle of a market advance but “wrong” at market peaks and troughs. There are plenty of warning signals that suggest that investors should be getting more cautious with portfolio allocations. However, the “herd” is still supporting asset prices at current levels based primarily on the “fear” of missing out on further advances.

Five Main Things To Watch In Today's Chinese GDP Report

There is a reason why, when the Chinese Q3 GDP print is revealed shortly, it will be an utterly meaningless indicator - the number is a goalseeked, arbitrary political construct meant to convey not information about the economy, but about Beijing's intentions what it may or may not do in the future. Unfortunately, since it is the only official number to come out of Beijing, hours will be spent debating it for the next few days. As such, here are 5 key things to focus on...

China Injects Economy With A Quarter Trillion In Debt In One Month, But The Full Story Is Much Scarier

"From a growth rate perspective, the speed of credit expansion is alarming. The current pace of credit growth in China is realistically in a range between 19% and 20%, well above the reported official TSF growth of 12.4% and new loan growth of 13.0% in September. Relative to GDP, China’s credit-to-GDP ratio currently in a range from 260% to 275% of GDP as of September 2016" - Barclays

Can The Market Hang On To Support Here?

It is critical for the markets to “hang on” to current support at the previous breakout highs. A failure to do so will put the markets back into the previous trading range that has existed going back to 2014.

Global Stocks Tumble To Three Month Lows As China Fears Return

Remember when two weeks ago the China Beige Book warned that "It’s A Lot More Negative Than People Think" in the world's second biggest economy? Well after months of complacency about the Chinese economy and financial risks emanating from its $35 trillion financial sector, overnight the world got a rude awakening when China export figures tumbled, signalling a deeper slowdown than many anticipated just as the Fed prepares to raise interest rates.

Global Stocks Pressured By Weak Earnings, Rate Hike Concerns; Pound Jumps

Global stocks are pressured this morning after a plunge in the Thai stock market and currency on concerns about the king's health and Fed hikes coupled with some more bad news out of Samsung which cut profit estimates by a third, while European stocks are suffering after Swedish telecom giant Ericsson issued a profit warning, sending its shares plunging 17%.