Capital Markets

Jackson Hole'd - A New Monetary Order Looms

The title of this year’s Jackson Hole meeting – “Designing Resilient Monetary Policy Frameworks for the Future” – is a telling one. It is actually a call to a specific goal, rather than the typical generic one. You get the feeling that the Fed has something on its mind... Translation: Fed projections have been wrong, and the central bank doesn’t know how to make them any better in the future.

Deutsche Bank CEO Warns Of "Fatal Consequences" For Savers

The CEO of Deutsche Bank unveiled a striking warning, which however, in was not aimed at his old nemesis Mario Draghi, but at Germany itself, hinting that if Deutsche Bank goes down it is taking everyone down with it, when he warned of "fatal consequences" for savers and pension plans.

The Permian Pitfall: A Race To The Bottom For Tight Oil

Remember the shale gale and Saudi America? The scale of those outlandish delusions has now dwindled to plays in a few counties in West Texas and southeastern New Mexico. Saudi Permian. It’s a race to the bottom as investors double down on the tight oil companies that can still tell a growth story.

The First Victims Of The Libor Surge Have Emerged... In Japan

So far US banks have escaped the recent Libor surge, but the higher funding costs and shrunken market are hitting Japanese banks particularly hard, as they have been sourcing as much as a third of their U.S. dollar liquidity in the short-term U.S. market. Japanese banks have about $125 billion to $150 billion of CP and CDs maturing before the end of September.

Madness In Mario-World: European Companies Issue Debt Simply Because The ECB Will Buy That Debt

Things are so absurd in the Eurozone that the ECB is buying private placement debt with little regard for safety. In turn, private equity companies issue debt simply because they know in advance the ECB will buy it. It’s a startling example of how the market is adapting to extremes of monetary policy, and it’s a safe conclusion the experiment will not end well.

CLSA: "The Bank Of Japan Has Nationalized The Japanese Stock Market"

The Bank of Japan's near doubling of its purchases of Tokyo shares is causing investors to worry the central bank will dominate financial markets, which could lead to price distortions as it continues to grease the economy. It also prompted a CLSA analyst to tell the truth: "The BOJ is nationalizing the stock market."

Marx & Markets

Investors should check their ideologies and personal politics at the door. The fact is, that strong and enduring capital markets can only survive in truly capitalist economies, preferably with strong representative governments. With accretive capital formation in question, it occurs to us that the largest global capital markets have become little more than tools for Marx’s "ruling class" - in this case well-funded politicians and their patrons - to socialize the factors of production. Whether such a conclusion is good, bad or irrelevant to market performance is the focus of this report.

Frontrunning: August 19

  • European shares, oil ease as markets return to Fed-watching (Reuters)
  • Brent crude slides, but on track for third week of gains (Reuters)
  • Rio 2016: Lochte’s Teammates, USOC Join With Police in Discrediting Robbery Story (WSJ)
  • OPEC Freeze Wouldn’t Be So Potent as Gulf Rivals Pump More (BBG)
  • Hackers targeted Trump campaign, Republican Party groups (Reuters)

Fed's Williams Calls For An Overhaul Of Monetary And Fiscal Policy... But There Is A Problem

According to John Williams, central banks and governments must come up with new monetary and fiscal policies to kickstart a global economy which is barely growing (thanks to 7 years of flawed monetary policy). "We can wait for the next storm and hope for better outcomes or prepare for them now and be ready." As a result, Williams believes that a major fiscal stimulus thrust is now critical to propel the US economy higher. And he is, mostly, right. There is just one problem...

The Warren Buffett Economy: How Central-Bank-Enabled Financialization Divided America

Needless to say, the above outlandish graph does not capture capitalism at work. Nor did the speculators who surfed upon this $45 trillion bubble harvest their monumental windfalls owing to investment genius. Instead, it is the perverted fruit of Bubble Finance, and there is no better illustration of this bubble surfer syndrome than the sainted Warren Buffett.

Why Wall Street Loved What The Bank of England Announced Today

Following a handful of underwhelming monetary announcements by the likes of the ECB, BOJ and RBA, today the BOE's Mark Carney unveiled his own version of Draghi's infamous "whatever it takes" gambit, unleashing a kitchen sink of options that went well beyond what Wall Street expected, even quasi-copying Draghi's phrasing, saying the central bank will take "whatever action is necessary" to ensure the UK economy remains strong.