Central Banks

"It's Not Panicking If You're First" - China Devaluation Is Closer Than Anyone Thinks

People are assuming there’s only one way to fight a war today of global proportions. We're not in that camp. We believe it will come monetarily – not military. At least at first. For once it takes place all bets are off as to what happens next. The obvious first mover advantage for China (and all its current allies) would be to use the rhetoric coming out of the current U.S. political arena, along with current, as well as proposed monetary policies via the Fed, ECB, and Japan.

"Champagne Supernova" - IceCap Asks What Happens When The Bond Bubble Finally Pops

Most investors today have no idea what is happening in the bond market today and have exposed themselves to incredible amounts of risk. Because a global crisis in the government bond market has never occurred in our lifetime – advisors, financial planners and big banks continue the tradition of telling their clients that bonds are safer than stocks. As a result, investors remain heavily invested in the bond market and are therefore smack dab in the middle of the riskiest investment they’ll ever see.

Celebrating 45 Years Of Phony Money

In the pre-1971 economy, it was Main Street that produced wealth and accumulated real dollars. After 1971, it was Wall Street that controlled access to the new counterfeit money – and made sure it captured much of it. The new system gave the feds the “flexibility” they were looking for. But it completely changed the nature of our money and our economy.

 

The Real Message From Asset Inflation

The earliest signs are developing of hyperinflation, more correctly described as a collapse of the purchasing power of all the major government currencies. Extreme one-way bets aside, the overriding reason for valuation disparities is becoming more consistent with the downgrading of cash, rather than a revaluation of assets

A Collision-Course With Crisis: Making The Wrong Choices For The Wrong Reasons

Life is full of examples where folks make bad choices for noble reasons. Not every decision is a winner: sometimes you make the right call, sometimes you don't. That's completely understandable and defensible. Fate is fickle, and no one is 100% right 100% of the time. But what's much harder to condone is when people embrace the wrong decision even when they have ample evidence and comprehension that doing so runs counter to their welfare.

The Market For Lemons, The Market For Bullshit, And The Great Cascading Credence Crash Of 2016

The underlying problem is, I think, a very strange one. But it’s a risk faced by any society that both undergoes rapid technological change, and contains organized interest groups. (Formal or informal.) Something really bad is happening to all our bullshit. In fact, I’ve begun to worry that there’s actually a sort of crash or cascading failure going on in the bullshit market. If there is, I think it’s driven, as previous bullshit crashes were, by changing technology.

The Essence Of Trump's Appeal To The Flyover Zone: "We Are Not Winning Anymore"

...Massive debts, no good jobs, faltering productivity, soaring entitlements, declining net investment and drastically shrinking household incomes add up to an unprecedented assault on America’s vaunted middle class. In fact, the middle class is shrinking markedly as an empirical matter and fading rapidly as an aspirational possibility. It is profoundly misguided Wall Street/Washington policy regime that has given rise to this massive economic failure. For more than three decades they have sown the wind. Trump is the whirlwind they are now reaping...

"Policymakers Have Been Calling A 'Depression' A 'Recovery' For Nearly A Decade"

"I'd like to think that logic and reality will prevail; that distaste for being told how great the world is has become sufficiently revolting and obviously false to stir the world’s populace to end the imbalances. But that, again, will take time, perhaps a good deal of time; until then, whenever it hopefully is, central banks continue to operate with impunity even though the risks of their intemperance rise exponentially..."

A Fully Automated Stock Market Blow-Off?

About one month ago we read that risk parity and volatility targeting funds had record exposure to US equities. It seems unlikely that this has changed – what is likely though is that the exposure of CTAs has in the meantime increased as well, as the recent breakout to new highs should be delivering the required technical signals. All these strategies are more or less automated (essentially they are simply quantitative and/or technical strategies relying on inter-market correlations, volatility measures, and/or momentum). We believe this is an inherently very dangerous situation.

America Needs A Good, Old-Fashioned Economic Depression

A good, old-fashioned, pre-1929 depression (like the short-lived, eleven-month depression in 1920-1921, before the days of “modern” central banking and “enlightened” Keynesian intervention “cures”) is the only tonic that can clear out the malinvestment built up since the beginning of the fiat money era.

"What Has Been Will Be Again" - Today's Fantasies Are Vast & Unremitting

Simple logic seems to have been suspended for the near universal disregard of the rules of common sense in the treatment of the money supply of the world.  How long can this possibly persist?  Obviously, at some point, this fantasy will be shattered. For just because central banks have continuously increased their balance sheets in recent years without igniting runaway price inflation doesn’t mean the danger isn’t there.  Remember, correlation doesn’t imply causation.  But it can imply confusion.

The Market's Biggest Permabull Is "Scared About The Month Of August"

JPM's former permabull, Tom Lee, needs no introduction: any time he appears on CNBC, his advice has been simple: buy it all. Which is why we were surprised to read that while Lee remains generally bullish on central planning, and its most direct manifestation, new all time highs, he writes in his latest commentary that he is "scared about the month of August."

Its 2007 Deja Vu All Over Again: Goldman Is Raising $8 Billion LBO Fund

The last time Goldman raised an private-equity buyout fund was in 2007: at just over $20 billion, it was the second biggest private-equity fund ever. It also top-ticked the market. Nine years later, the WSJ reports that Goldman is finally preparing a much anticipated sequel, in the form of a corporate-buyout fund with assets between $5 and $8 billion.