Central Banks

Tyler Durden's picture

Total Derivatives Decline By 3% In Q2 To Only $691 Trillion

Who says macroprudential regulation doesn't work: according to the BIS, notional amounts of outstanding OTC derivatives contracts fell by 3% to "only"
$691 trillion at end-June 2014. This is also roughly equal to the total derivative notional outstanding just before the Lehman collapse, when global central banks volunteered taxpayers to pump a few trillion in capital to meet global variation margin calls. Clearly the system, in the immortal words of Jim Cramer, is "fine."

Tyler Durden's picture

The Most Elementary Question Must Not Be Asked

You almost have to step outside of economics, even out of the financial world as a whole, to pose what is the most elementary question about our economy today. That can’t be right.  The most elementary question is not how we can achieve growth, it’s whether we need growth, and what we would need it for that is important enough to destroy our entire societies and economies for.... We’re in dire need of fresh blood and smart new ideas to clean up the mess the present ideologies and their puppets and puppetmasters have created.

Tyler Durden's picture

Citi: "The Limits Of Investors' Faith That Central Banks Can Push Up Asset Prices, Are Increasingly On Display"

... It is hard to sum up a conference featuring fifty-eight different sessions spread across eight different streams: everyone’s impressions will inevitably be personal. Ours, though, is that investors remain united in their faith in the central banks – if not for their ability to create growth, then at least in their ability to push up asset prices. And yet the limits of that faith are increasingly on display. Not only are there signs of trouble at individual corporates on the ground. There is also a growing realization that the central bankers themselves – be it the ECB today, or the past and present Chairs of the Fed – subscribe to different theologies.

Tyler Durden's picture

5 Things To Ponder: Unstoppable Force Paradox

Investors have been lulled into a state of complacency due to a seemingly "unstoppable" rise in the financial markets. Bad news remains good news, and even small drawdowns are quickly reversed sending stocks surging higher. Eventually, the paradox of what happens when a seemingly unstoppable force collides with an immovable will be answered. Historically, such realizations have not been kind to investors. This weekend's reading list takes a look at the reasons why stocks could rise higher, and the potential they won't. The question to be answered is "What will you do when the immovable object is met."

Tyler Durden's picture

Only Yesterday - How The Federal Debt Went From $1 Trillion To $18 Trillion in 33 Years

In the great fiscal scheme of things, October 22, 1981 seems like only yesterday. That’s the day the US public debt crossed the $1 trillion mark for the first time. It had taken the nation 74,984 days to get there (205 years). What prompts this reflection is that just a few days ago the national debt breached the $18 trillion mark; and the last trillion was added in hardly 365 days.

Phoenix Capital Research's picture

The Biggest Bubble in History is About to Pop

 THE bubble, the biggest bubble in financial history: an incredible $100 trillion monster that is now growing by trillions of dollars every few months.

Tyler Durden's picture

"Draghi Loses The Majority" Blasts A Triumphant German Press

Wondering why stocks suddenly found a soft patch in the last few minutes of trading? Here is the reason: according to a report in German Die Welt, the ECB's president and former Goldman Sachs employee, Mario Draghi, has just lost the majority on the ECB Executive Board.

GoldCore's picture

Gold +14.3%, 12.3%, 5.8% and 0.4% in JPY, EUR, GBP and USD 2014 YTD

In terms of the cycle of market emotions, gold is as close to ‘depression’ as we have seen (see chart). Yet, so far in 2014, gold is 14.3%, 12.3%, 5.8% and 0.4% higher in japanese yen, euros, sterling and dollars respectively (see chart).

Tyler Durden's picture

Here Is The Reason Why The Average Lifespan Of US Corporations Has Never Been Shorter

Just another "unintended consequence" of modern non-stakeholder capitalism and central-planning.

Sprott Money's picture

Charges Brought Against National Bank of Ukraine for Liquidating Gold Reserves

It has been speculated that western central bankers have been dishoarding their peoples hard earned gold reserves in a futile attempt to keep the price of precious metals down and to artificially prop up fiat currencies.



Although it is a horrible crime against its citizens, one needs to understand that the source of government power comes from its ability to fool its people into thinking fiat currency has real value.

Tyler Durden's picture

Putin Offers Full Amnesty For Money Repatriation, Threatens Crackdown Against FX Speculators

most notable announcement by Putin was that Russia would provide a "full amnesty" for holders of offshore funds, in a push to repatriate some of the $125 billion in capital that is said to have left the nation in 2015. To entice Russia billionaires to keep their cash in Russia Putin reminded everyone how hostile the west could be toward Russian money, using the Cyprus bail-in as an example. To wit: "I announce a full amnesty for capital returning to Russia, and i repeat, a full amnesty. What does that mean? Those people who fully legalize, fully bring back their capital to Russia, should be protected from being dragged to various law enforcement agencies, and from having to prove where they got their money from, and from being exposed to criminal investigations." Do Russians want to be "ripped-off abroad" once again when the next Cyprus takes place? Their best choice is to return to Russia, Putin added.

Tyler Durden's picture

Algo Eyes On Draghi Ahead Of ECB Announcement

Today we'll learn more about whether Mr Draghi becomes Super Mario in the near future as the widely anticipated ECB meeting is now only a few hours away. We will do another summary preview of market expectations shortly, but in a nutshell, nobody really expects Draghi to announce anything today although the jawboning is expected to reach unseen levels. The reason is that Germany is still staunchly against outright public QE, and Draghi probably wants to avoid and outright legal confrontation. As DB notes, assuming no new policy moves, the success of today's meeting will probably depend on the degree to which Draghi indicates the need for more action soon and the degree to which that feeling is unanimous within the council. Over the past weekend Weidmann's comment about falling oil prices representing a form of stimulus highlights that this consensus is still proving difficult to build. It might need a couple more months of low growth and inflation, revised staff forecasts and a stubbornly slow balance sheet accumulation to cement action.

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