Consumer Prices

Futures Rebound On Weaker Yen; Oil Hits 2016 Highs

In recent days, we have observed a distinct trading pattern: a ramp early in the US morning, usually triggered by some aggressive momentum ignition, such as today's unexplained pump then dump in the EURUSD with stocks rising after the European open, rising throughout the US open, then peaking around the time the US closed at which point it is all downhill for the illiquid market. So far today, the pattern has held, and after trading flat for most of the overnight session, with Europe initially in the red perhaps on disappointment about the Italy bank bailout fund, a bout of early Europe-open associated buying pushed US futures up, following the first rebound in the USDJPY after 7 days of declines which also helped the Nikkei close 1.1% higher.

Key Economic Events In The Coming Week

While the market is still enjoying the post-NFP weekly data lull, economic data starts to pick up again in the coming days, alongside the start of the reporting season. Below are this week's key events.

Blackrock Turns Its Back On Japan Leaving Kuroda Scrambling

Things are going from bad to worse for the efficacy of the grand - and failed from the beginning - experiment known as Abenomics. As Bloomberg reports, Larry Fink's Blackrock has changed its stance on investing in Japan, and joins Citigroup, Credit Suisse, and LGT Capital Partners, the $50 billion asset manager based in Switzerland in their decision to head for the exits. Ironically, Blackrock's decision comes only a few months after blogging about "The Case for Investing in Japan", in which they explicitly cited increased demand for Japanese stocks.

"The Greater Depression Has Started" - Comparing 1930s & Today

The Greater Depression has started. Most people don't know it because they can neither confront the thought nor understand the differences between this one and the last. As a climax approaches, many of the things that you've built your life around in the past are going to change and change radically.

On Goldman's "Dubious Advice To Short Gold”

Those betting against Goldman Sach’s retail investment advice have generally been on the right side of things. The same thing is about to happen again. “Short gold! Sell gold!” said Goldman’s head commodity trader, Jeff Currie, during a CNBC “Power Lunch” interview. Currie’s advice was in response to the question “Is there any commodity you are recommending that can help our viewers make some money?” Currie’s provided several reasons for shorting gold, blatantly wrong.

AsiaPac Data Deluge: China Good, South Korea Bad, Japan Ugly

An avalanche of data from AsiaPac tonighht was a very mixed bag... South Korean trade data fell again and deflation struck; Aussie home price appreciation slowed to its weakest in 2.5 years; Japanese data was a total disastrophe everywhere... and then there was China. Both Manufacturing and Services PMIs bounced (the former back into expansion) which is a major problem for Janet, because if China is back in recovery, then The Fed no longer has to worry about China's economy when deciding on the next rate hike.

Goldman's Take On Yellen's Dovish Deluge: "A Less Confident Take On Rate Normalization"

In recent weeks, Goldman Sachs has gained prominence by being the only bank left standing in its confidence that the Fed's forecast of 2 rate hikes in 2016 is wrong, and instead is sticking with its hawkish prediction of at least 3 rate hikes for 2016. This also explains why Goldman has been pounding the table on long US dollar bets, which incidentally have led to major losses in the past three major central bank announcements, two from Mario Draghi and one from Yellen. why we were curious how Goldman would reconcile the latest "dovish" shocker from Yellen which has unleashed a dramatic buying spree of all risk assets (as of this moments the S&P500 is trading at a 23x LTM GAAP P/E), with Goldman's hawkish bias.

Another Volcker Moment? Guessing The Future Without Say's Law

If the dollar’s purchasing power falls much further, the market will expect higher interest rates, so this then becomes the likely outcome. The question will then arise as to whether or not the Fed will dare to raise interest rates sufficiently to stabilise the dollar's purchasing power. If the Fed delays, it could find itself facing a difficult choice. The level of interest rates required to stabilise the dollar’s purchasing power would not be consistent with maintaining the record levels of debt in both government and private sectors. Thirty-six years on it could be another Volcker moment.

Holiday Market Summary

With all of Europe and the U.S. closed for holiday, what little market action there was overnight came out of Asia, where China once again was engaged in its last hour "National Team" market manipulation, which saved the SHCOMP from a red close after the now traditional last hour buying spree pushed the Shanghai Composite from red on the session an hour before close to near the highs of the day.

Fed Mouthpiece Parses Timid Janet's Latest Pronouncement

"Federal Reserve officials reduced estimates of how much they expect to raise short-term interest rates in 2016 and beyond, nodding to lingering risks to the economic outlook posed by soft global economic growth and financial-market volatility."

China Food Inflation Explodes To 4 Year Highs As Producer Prices Slump For 47th Straight Month

For the 47th month in a row, China's Producer Prices have fallen year-over-year - a record deflationary streak. CPI rose 2.3% YoY - the fastest pace since May 2014 (against expectations of a 1.8% rise in consumer prices, and at the upper end of the +1.5% to +2.4% range). PPI printed as expected with a  4.9% YoY plunge in producer prices (-4.5% to -5.5% range). However, what is most disturbing - from both a social unrest and economic-stimulus-hope basis, is that Food prices exploded 7.3% YoY - the most in 4 years.