• Tim Knight from...
    09/19/2014 - 20:15
    I was originally going to title this post "Jackie DeAngelis Must Die", but I thought she might take it the wrong way.

Corporate America

testosteronepit's picture

NSA Revelations Kill IBM Hardware Sales in China





IBM tried to come up with a panic-free explanation for the sudden collapse of hardware sales in China, but the Chinese government had warned of the coming fiasco in mid-August

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Why Obama Allowed Bailouts Without Indictments





"The government’s bailout plan destroyed capitalism. In a capitalist system, those who stood to gain–and already made off with large gains—would have to bear the risk. The bailouts represented a corruption of capitalism. Crony capitalism violates the spirit of democracy established by the Founding Fathers of the republic known as the United States." - Janet Tavakoli

All of the suffering and hardships the majority of Americans are experiencing today are directly related to the coup pulled off by the crony financial oligarchs in the fall of 2008, and all of the media and political minions that helped them do it. People realize we have become a Banana Republic and they have now lost all hope.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Guest Post: Look Who's Winning





The chart below tells a story. Do you think the fiscal and monetary policies implemented by Bernanke and Obama since 2008 were designed to benefit you? If you believe in regression to the mean and a world based on reality, then you should be prepared for corporate profits to decline by 14% to 20% over the next four years. What do you think that will do to a stock market where the PE ratio is already at valuation levels of 1929, 2000, and 2007?

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Guest Post: Yellen In, Syria Done, 8 Risks That Remain





With Syria now quickly fading from the headlines and Wall Street believing that Yellen is a "shoe in" for the Fed, what headwinds still remain for the markets ahead...

 
Tyler Durden's picture

More Official Reactions To Summers' Stunner





"This is a good move by Larry. This is a short-term plus for the bond market.".... "If it's almost anybody but Larry, I think bonds will rally." ...  "I do think there will be less for investors to worry about as there will be more policy continuity at the Fed." ...  "Larry Summers' past decisions to deregulate Wall Street and do the bidding of corporate America has made the lives of millions of Americans more acrimonious. He would have been an awful Fed Chair. President Obama should appoint someone to lead the Fed who has not accepted millions in payments from Wall Street, and who will prioritize an economy that works for the little guy above further enrichment for the big guy."

 
Tyler Durden's picture

El-Erian: What's Happening To Bonds And Why?





To say that bonds are under pressure would be an understatement. Over the last few months, sentiment about fixed income has flipped dramatically: from a favored investment destination that is deemed to benefit from exceptional support from central banks, to an asset class experiencing large outflows, negative returns and reduced standing as an anchor of a well-diversified asset allocation. Similar to prior periods, history will regard the ongoing phase of dislocations in the bond market as a transitional period of adjustment triggered by changing expectations about policy, the economy and asset preferences – all of which have been significantly turbocharged by a set of temporary and ultimately reversible technical factors. By contrast, history is unlikely to record a change in the important role that fixed income plays over time in prudent asset allocations and diversified investment portfolios – in generating returns, reducing volatility and lowering the risk of severe capital loss. Understanding well what created this change is critical to how investors may think about the future.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Frontrunning: September 11





  • Obama Holds Fire on Syria, Waits on Russia Plan (WSJ)
  • China Shadow Banking Returns as Growth Rebound Adds Risk (Reuters)
  • Not one but two: Greece May Need Two More Aid Packages Says ECB’s Coene (WSJ)
  • BoJ insider warns of need for wage rises (FT) ... as we have been warning since November, and as has not been happening
  • California city backs plan to seize negative equity mortgages (Reuters)
  • Home Depot Is Accused of Shaking Down Suspected Shoplifters (BBG)
  • Most-Connected Man at Deutsche Bank Favors Lightest Touch (BBG)
  • Norway Pledges to Limit Oil Spending (BBG)
  • China Shadow Banking Returns as Growth Rebound Adds Risk (BBG)
  • Gundlach Says Fed Is Mistaken in How It's Ending Easing (BBG)
 
Tyler Durden's picture

Labor Force Participation Crisis? Don't Blame Demographics!





The Labor Force Participation Rate - in English, the percent of the population that is either in a job or looking for a job - fell yesterday to fresh 35 year lows. This is not a new trend, in fact since the end of 1999 (the dot-com bust) it has trended lower from well over 67% to the current 63.2%; which means the current unemployment rate would be almost 11% if the labor force was constant from when Obama took office. There appear to be at least four reasons (excuses) put forth for this dismal 'structural' trend but chief among them - and propagandized by most in the mainstream (given its lack of 'blame') - is the so-called 'aging of America' or demographics. There is only one problem with that 'myth'; it's entirely inconsistent with other Western economies who are experiencing exactly the same demographic shift. The collapse in the US labor force is, in fact, due to excess credit having fueled artificial growth for 3 decades; and now a government throwing free money at the population in the form of disability insurance (which has surged) and student loans (which are exponentially exploded). So who (or what) is to blame for the US' collapsing workforce? Simple, the unintended consequences of government interference.

 
Marc To Market's picture

Fed may Still Have to Revise Down its Growth Forecasts





The Fed's GDP forecasts are still too optimisitc even after the Q2 GDP revisions.  And the core PCE deflator is closer to zero than it is to the Fed's target.  Tapering still a done deal ? 

 
testosteronepit's picture

German Government CONFIRMS: Key Entities Not To Use Windows 8 with TPM 2.0, Fearing Control by ‘Third Parties’ (Such As NSA)





German Federal Office for Security in Information Technology: "Loss of Control Over the Operating System and the Hardware"

 
williambanzai7's picture

I HaVe a DReAM (Slight Return)





A government that is operating under the credo "by the corporation for the corporation",  rather than "by the people for the people." 

 
Tyler Durden's picture

The Future Ain't What It Used To Be





Analyst expectations for top line growth in the back half of 2013 continue to fade, and worries over a looming “Revenue recession” grow commensurately.   As ConvergEx's Nick Colas notes, the first quarter of 2013 posted an average negative 0.6% revenue comparison for the 30 companies of the Dow Jones Industrial Average, and Q2 (with a few companies left to report) looks to be +0.3%.  But back out the financials, and he points out that the number goes negative to the tune of (0.3%).  Analysts are still chopping away at their back half expectations, now down to 1.9% for Q3 and 2.1% for Q4 2013.  Those are down from 4-5% expected comps back in March, so the trend is still clearly not our friend.  As we have pointed out previously, equity markets have been powered by multiple expansion year-to-date, but, as Colas asks (rhetorically) do you really want to pay up at this point in the business cycle for still declining expectations?

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Crashing China Got You Down? Don't Worry, There's A "Soaring" Europe For That





Plunging Chinese manufacturing and an 11 month low PMI got you down? Don't worry: there's a Europe for that, which overnight reported that manufacturing and service PMI in Germany and, don't laugh, France soared far above expectations (German Mfg and Services PMIs of 50.3 and 52.5, up from 48.6 and 50.4, and above expectations of 49.2 and 50.8; French Mfg and Services PMIs of 48.3 and 49.8, up from 47.2 and 48.4 and an 11 and 17 month high, respectively, blowing away expectations of 47.6 and 48.8). The result was a composite Eurozone Manufacturing PMI of 50.1, above 50 for the first time since February of 2012, up from 48.8 and at a 24 month high - reporting the largest monthly increase in output sunce June 2011, as well as a composite Services PMI of 49.6, up from 48.3, and an 18 month high. In other words, European Composite PMI is expanding (above 50) for the first time since January 2012.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

"Any News Is Good News" Levitation Continues





Don't look now but futures are up as usual, driven higher by both good and bad news. The biggest event of the weekend, if largely priced in, was the victory by Abe's coalition in the upper-house leading to the following seat breakdown. Of course, judging by the Yen and market reaction, which barely managed to eek out a gain: its first in four trading days, the event was largely of the "sell the news" type despite such bold proclamations: "Abe’s victory in the upper house is bullish for Japanese equities and the Japanese economy as a whole, as the removal of political headwinds bolsters the government’s ability to press forward with all ‘three arrows’ of its growth strategy," John Vail, Tokyo-based chief global strategist at Nikko Asset Management Co., which manages $162 billion, wrote in an e-mail. Elsewhere in Europe, Portugal bond yields have plunged by roughly 60 bps on news that the Portuguese President Silva has backed the centre-right coalition government, consequently ruling out snap polls. Well, what else is he going to do? This also comes on the heels of a Goldman report that said a second bailout for the country will be necessary and will likely be discussed in the fall. That too is bullish. What also was bullish in Europe apparently is that government debt hit a new record high of 92.2% of GDP. Remember: debt is wealth so just buy more futures. Looking forward to the US, the market will focus on the latest existing home sales data, the Chicago Fed activity index, as well as earnings report releases from McDonalds, Texas Instruments and Halliburton and a bunch of other companies that will beat EPS and miss revenues.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

The Revenue Recession Of 2013





If you’ve wondered what the next recession might bring in the way of U.S. corporate earnings, you don’t have long to wait for an answer.  Analysts expect the 30 companies of the Dow Jones Industrial Average to post a meager 0.7% top line growth for the upcoming Q2 2013 reporting season.  If recent history – think all the way back to Q1 2013 – is any guide, that means we’ll actually see a decline in revenues for the just completed quarter once all the numbers are out.  And with Q1 posting an average negative 0.6% top line comparison to last year, that will constitute a “Revenue recession” for these large and generally well-managed multinationals.  If that makes you question why U.S. stocks are still up 15% on the year, look to both corporate profits (still at record highs) and the anticipation for a better second half.  Hope may not be a strategy, as the old saying goes, but it certainly moves markets.

 
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