CPI

Tyler Durden's picture

At The Halfway Point Of 2014, Futures Are Treading Water





It is the last day of not only the month but also the quarter, not to mention the halfway point of 2014, which means that window dressing by hedge funds will be rampant, as they scramble to catch up some of the ground lost to the S&P 500 so far in 2014. Most likely this means that once again the most shorted names will ramp in everyone's face and the short side of the hedgie book will soar, further pushing hedged P&L into the red, because remember: in a market in which all the risk is borne by the Fed there is no need to hedge.

 
Marc To Market's picture

The Dollar Shakes, But will it Break?





Overview of the price action in the foreign exchange market and a short word on US 10-year Treasuries.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

The Keynesian End Game Is Near: No Escape Velocity This Year, Either





The economic releases of the past few days are putting the lie to the Keynesian escape velocity myth. The latter is not just around the corner—-and 2014 is now virtually certain to mark the fifth year running when the boom predicted by Wall Street economist at the beginning of the year fizzled as actual results unfolded.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Japanese Economic Collapse Dislodges USDJPY Tractor Beam, Pushes Futures Lower





Abe's honeymoon is over. Following nearly two years of having free reign to crush the Japanese economy with his idiotic monetary and fiscal policies - but, but the Nikkei is up - the market may have finally pulled its head out of its, well, sand, and after last night's abysmal economic data from Japan which saw not only the highest (cost-push) inflation rate since 1982, in everything but wages (hence, zero demand-pull) - after wages dropped for 23 consecutive months, disposable income imploded - but a total collapse in household spending, the USDJPY  appears to have finally been dislodged from its rigged resting place just around 102. As a result the 50 pip overnight drop to 101.4 was the biggest drop in over a month. And since the Nikkei is nothing but the USDJPY (same for the S&P), Japan stocks tumbled 1.4%, their biggest drop in weeks, as suddenly the days of the grand Keynesian ninja out of Tokyo appear numbered. Unless Nomura manages to stabilize USDJPY and push it higher, look for the USDJPY to slide back to double digits in the coming weeks.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Abe's Worst Nightmare: Household Spending Collapses As Inflation Spikes





UPDATE: USDJPY has tumbled to 5 week lows and NKY has retraced all post-Fed gains

Japan is in trouble. Normally the news that a piece of macro data had utterly and completely collapsed would be greeted by thge BFTD mentality as bad news reinforces the printing-press of central planners' put guarenteeing future wealth for all... but not this time. Household spending collapsed 8.0% in May (echoing the plunge following the last tax hike in 1997) - more than double expectations and almost as bad as the month of the tsunami. Great news? That's the problem... the great limiter of central bank largesse is looming as Japanese CPI spiked to 3.7% - its highest in 24 years! (and Core CPI at 3.4% - its highest since 1982) This implicitly hobbles the BoJ from further exuberance and already JPY strength (and NKY weakness) are showing.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Guest Post: Proof That Government Economic Numbers Are Being Manipulated





How in the world does the government expect us to trust the economic numbers that they give us anymore? For a long time, many have suspected that they were being manipulated, and as you will see below it appears we now have proof that this is indeed the case.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Fed's Key Inflation Indicator Hits 19-Month High





Forget PPI (it's "cyclical"); ignore CPI (it's "noisy"); dismiss all the recent PMIs showing input prices surging and output prices dropping - that is the message the Fed is feeding the world over its 'inflation' concerns. However, the one indicator that the Fed really focuses on (or has said it does until now) - the PCE Deflator - just surged to 1.8% - its highest since October 2012 and nearing the Fed's 2% mandate-stumping level. Ignore that Janet!

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Futures Meander Ahead Of Today's Surge On Bad Economic News





Following yesterday's S&P surge on the worst hard economic data (not some fluffy survey conducted by a conflicted firm whose parent just IPOed and is thus in desperate need to perpetuate the market euphoria) in five years, there is little one can comment on how "markets" react to news. Good news, bad news... whatever - as long as it is flashing red, the HFT algos will send momentum higher. The only hope of some normalization is that following the latest revelation of just how rigged the market is due to various HFT firms, something will finally change. Alas, as we have said since the flash crash, there won't be any real attempts at fixing the broken market structure until the next, and far more vicious flash crash - one from which not even the NY Fed-Citadel PPT JV will be able to recover. For now, keep an eye on the USDJPY - as has been the case lately, the overnight USDJPY trading team has taken it lower ahead of the traditional US day session rebound which also pushes the S&P higher with it. For now the surge is missing but it won't be for longer - expect the traditional USDJPY ramp just before or as US stocks open for trading.

 
EconMatters's picture

The Fed Misrepresenting Inflation to Justify Inept Policy





The central banks need to downplay inflation, under-report it to justify their policies of the last five years...

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Things That Make You Go Hmmm... Like Central Banks' "Must-Win Confidence Game"





Are the markets ready (and, more importantly, able) to withstand higher rates? Well, with the Fed tapering another $10 bn last week to a chorus of "meh" from the markets, it certainly seems to suggest that this whole taper thing is going to trundle along harmlessly until it's been completed without disruption, but Grant Williams has a very nasty feeling about all this. Essentially, the central bank heads all around the globe are engaged in a must-win confidence game. They 'have' to make people believe that everything is under control and getting better, BUT at the same time they must ALSO make them believe that the accommodative policies currently in place will be here, essentially, forever (forever in market-time is normally about 18 months to two years). Bernanke gave us ZIRP; now Draghi — damned by his own lack of earlier action — has been forced to add NIRP to the acronym lexicon of modern finance. In reality, it's not about Zero Interest Rate Policy or, for that matter, Negative Interest Rate Policy. It's about Broken Interest Rate Policy. BIRP!

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Fed Policies Are Dangerous Claptrap: The Reason Why





There has been no forward progress in US hourly compensation over the last half century. How it is possible that the world’s richest and most technologically advanced economy ever, operating during a 50-year period that included the invention of the Internet … the triumph of capitalism in China and Russia … and a landing on the moon – that is the most bountiful half-century in human history – failed to make its most important component parts better off. And at the bedrock level, we find the explanation: Fed policies are dangerous claptrap.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Airline Inflation Takes Off: Air Fare Prices Soar At 97% Annualized Rate, Highest Since 1999





The May surge in airfare prices was so dramatic and unexpected, that on a compounded annualized basis (CAGR), the May surge in airline fares was a whopping 97%: the highest since 1999, and the third highest ever.
So, sorry America: you are stuck where you are, eating food that has rarely if ever cost more, fueling up with gas that is approaching it all time high summery prices. Enjoy Yellen's "noise."

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Key Events In The Coming Week





This week brings PMIs (US and Euro area ‘flash’) and inflation (US PCE, CPI in Germany, Spain, and Japan). Among other releases, next week in DMs includes [on Monday] PMIs in US (June P), Euro Area Composite (expect 52.8, a touch below previous) and Japan; [on Tuesday] US home prices (FHFA and S&P/Case Shiller) and Consumer Confidence (expect 83.5, same as consensus), Germany IFO; [on Wednesday] US Durable Goods Orders (expect -0.50%, at touch below consensus) and real GDP 1Q anniversary. 3rd (expect -2.0%) and Personal Consumption 1Q (expect 2.0%), and confidence indicators in Germany, France and Italy; [on Thursday] US PCE price index (expect 0.20%), Personal Income and Spending, and GS Analyst Index; and [on Friday] Reuters/U. Michigan Confidence (expect slight improvement to 82, same as consensus), GDP 1Q in France and UK (expect 0.8% and 0.9% yoy, respectively), and CPI in Germany, Italy, Spain and Japan.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Futures Exuberance On China PMI Fades After Eurozone Composite Drops To 6 Month Lows





Following last night's laughable (in light of the slow motion housing train wreck that is taking place, not to mention the concurrent capex spending halt and of course the unwinding rehypothecation scandal) Chinese PMI release by HSBC/Markit (one wonders how much of an allocation Beijing got in the Markit IPO) which obviously sent US equity futures surging to new record highs, it was almost inevitable that the subsequent manufacturing index, that of Europe, would be a disappointment around the board (since it would be less than "optical" to have a manufacturing slowdown everywhere in the world but the US). Sure enough, first France (Mfg PMI 47.8, Exp. 49.5, 49.6; and Services PMI 48.2, Exp. 49.4, Last 49.3) and then Germany (Mfg PMI 52.4, Exp. 52.5, Last 52.2; Services 54.8, Exp. 55.7, Last 56.0), missed soundly, leading to a broad decline in the Eurozone PMIs (Mfg 51.9, Exp. 52.2, Last 52.2; Services 52.8, 53.3, Last 53.2), which meant that the composite PMI tumbled from 53.2 to 52.8: the lowest in 6 months.

 
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