• Pivotfarm
    04/18/2014 - 12:44
    Peering in from the outside or through the looking glass at what’s going down on the other side is always a distortion of reality. We sit here in the west looking at the development, the changes and...

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Tyler Durden's picture

The Two Biggest Fears





There are two major concerns that everyone should be concerned about that we see taking this sell-off further and faster than anyone else expects...

 


Tyler Durden's picture

Guest Post: Is QE A Victimless Crime?





Tomorrow we prepare for a “new” Fed.  It looks a lot like the old Fed, but one can hope. In the meantime we wonder if QE is worth it?  Does it do what it is “supposed” to do?  No.  We don’t think it has done much for jobs or inflation or housing.  We look at the pre QE data and the post QE data and we are underwhelmed. But what real evidence is there that QE is helping the economy?  Would we be the same without it?  Better even?  I am told no, but I am told a lot of things that turn out not to be true.  If it was clear that QE was really helping the economy, I wouldn’t be wondering why we do it. But is there any harm to QE?  That is the other side of the coin.  Ask any person from an Emerging Market whether QE is harmful and you will likely get a very different answer than the one Ben has given.

 


Tyler Durden's picture

From Greece To Crude And Everything Inbetween: The Best And Worst Performing Assets In October





Curious which were the best and worst performing asset classes for the month of October? Deutsche Bank explains.

 


Sprout Money's picture

Here comes the Commodity Super cycle: Part 2





Commodities are no longer on investors’ radar screens. Various signals, however, are pointing to a new rally within the commodities super cycle.

 


Tyler Durden's picture

June's Winners And Losers





Think gold and silver were the worst performing financial asset in June? Think again: that dubious distinction falls to the Bovespa, the Shanghai Composite and the Greek stock market index, all of which tumbled more than the precious metal complex did in the past month. Yet what an odd month for hard assets - on one hand WTI, Corn and Brent were the best performing assets, while gold, silver, copper and wheat tumbled.

 


Tyler Durden's picture

What The Fed Is Looking At





A sense among investors that the global economy is unraveling has injected tremendous volatility into the markets. As Bloomberg's Rich Yamarone notes, if the global equity market decline is not a “Sell in May” event, but the beginning of a great unwinding, then the economy, skating on thin ice, may be even more susceptible to recession. However, most of the US equity disconnect from the reality of weak data (and other markets) can be laid at the feet of the Fed's ever-generous monetary policy. However, given all of this 'weakness' - or missing of Fed benchmarks that we discuss below - that the Fed is well aware of, we ask again, why would so many members have been out discussing 'Taper' if it were not due to their concerns of broken markets and bubble conditions.

 


Tyler Durden's picture

Another Month Of Record European Unemployment And Dropping Inflation Sets Up An ECB Rate Cut





The weakness in economic data (not to be confused with the centrally-planned anachronism known as the "markets") started overnight when despite a surge in Japanese consumer spending (up 5.2% on expectations of 1.6%, the most in nine years) by those with access to the stock market and mostly of the "richer" variety, did not quite jive with a miss in retail sales, which actually missed estimates of dropping "only" -0.8%, instead declining -1.4%. As the FT reported what we said five months ago, "Four-fifths of Japanese households have never held any securities, and 88 per cent have never invested in a mutual fund, according to a survey last year by the Japan Securities Dealers Association." In other words any transient strength will be on the back of the Japanese "1%" - those where the "wealth effect" has had an impact and whose stock gains have offset the impact of non-core inflation. In other words, once the Yen's impact on the Nikkei225 tapers off (which means the USDJPY stops soaring), that will be it for even the transitory effects of Abenomics. Confirming this was Japanese Industrial production which also missed, rising by only 0.2%, on expectations of a 0.4% increase. But the biggest news of the night was European inflation data: the April Eurozone CPI reading at 1.2% on expectations of a 1.6% number, and down from 1.7%, which has now pretty much convinced all the analysts that a 25 bps cut in the ECB refi rate, if not deposit, is now merely a formality and will be announced following a unanimous decision.

 


thetechnicaltake's picture

5 Divergences Worth Noting





We are wondering if and when these signals will have significance.

 


thetechnicaltake's picture

Chart of the Week: Where Are We? Risk On or Risk Off?





Chairman Bernanke is losing the war to re-inflate the economy and stock market. 

 


Tyler Durden's picture

Why Obama Supporters Should Buy Commodities, Not Stocks





While patriotically buying US equities, or Intrade contracts, is 'believed' to reflexively improve the odds of the incumbent reaching a second term, the correlation between Obama's lead over Romney and stocks is actually not that high. The most highly correlated 'vehicle' for 'impacting' the odds of an Obama victory is, according to empirical data, the CRB Index.

 


Tyler Durden's picture

Overnight Sentiment: On This Day In Manchurian Invasion History





There was a time when sentiment and newsflow mattered, and then Bernanke took over. If there is anything today's soaked vacuum tubes will focus on is that it is the 81st anniversary of the invasion of Manchuria by Japan, as developments in the East China Sea are starting to get decidedly deja vuish, if somewhat inverted. Also notable is the ever louder chatter that Spain will have to be destroyed (bonds plunge), for it to be saved (Rajoy submits bailout request), as we observed over a month ago. For that to happen, the central planners will need to allow the markets to take a deep breath and actually slide, which in turn may crush confidence in central planners' ability to keep markets rising in perpetuity. What's a central planner to do these days to be appreciated anyway. It also means that the days of innocence, when nothing at all matters on the fundamental side, will, just like in Q1 after the LTRO $1.3 trillion injection, be followed by days when fundamentals matter with a vengeance. Alas, we are not there yet. Instead, the best we can do is wonder just what asset will experience today's flash crash du jour following yesterday's still unexplained 5% plunge in crude in minutes. New Normal indeed.

 


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