Creditors

Futures Rise In Thin Trading On Back Of Yen Weakness; Europe Closed

With European markets closed across the continent on Monday as the Easter holiday continues, overnight Asia was busy with China Shanghai Composite letting off some steam, and closing down 0.7% at session lows on concerns the Shanghai and Shenzhen home bubble have been popped by the politburo, Japan was a different story with the Yen sliding following a report by the Sankei newspaper that Abe will announce in May his intention to delay the planned levy hike, coupled with additional reports that Japan will unveil a major fiscal stimulus (and just on Friday Abe said he is "not thinking at all about supplemental budget" at this time).

The World Has 6 Options To Avoid Japan's Fate, And According To HSBC, They Are All Very Depressing

"The escape options are a mixture of the ineffectual, the limited, the risky, the foolhardy or the excessively slow. As Japan’s recent experiments have demonstrated, upping the monetary dosage alone is not enough to cure the affliction. Indeed, to the extent that monetary stimulus only encourages a further wave of risk-taking within financial markets – often outside of the mainstream banking system - it may only perpetuate unstable deflationary stagnation."

The Biggest Short

Some reversals of financial trends prove so momentous they define the generation in which they occur. The stock market crash in 1929 kicked off the Great Depression, which ushered in the welfare and then the warfare state and redefined the relationship between government and citizens. Bonds and stocks began their bull market runs in the early 1980s. Now, those markets are fonts of optimism increasingly unhinged from reality. The US has come full circle. The New Deal and World War II marked a massive shift of resources and power to the federal government. Conversely, financial reversal will fuel a virulent backlash against the government and its central bank.

Frontrunning: March 23

  • Futures little changed day after Brussels attacks (Reuters)
  • Trump, Clinton win big in Arizona, but Cruz, Sanders show fight (Reuters)
  • Belgium identifies Brussels bomb suspect, suicide bombers (Reuters)
  • After Brussels Terrorist Attacks, Security Ramped Up in U.S. Cities (WSJ)
  • Terror Impact Threatens Cameron EU Pitch, Merkel's Open Door (BBG)
  • Brussels Attacks Will Jolt 2016 U.S. Presidential Race (WSJ)

It's Official: Canadian Bank Depositors Are Now At Risk Of Bail-Ins

"To protect Canadian taxpayers in the unlikely event of a large bank failure, the Government is proposing to implement a bail-in regime that would reinforce that bank shareholders and creditors are responsible for the bank’s risks—not taxpayers. This would allow authorities to convert eligible long-term debt of a failing systemically important bank into common shares to recapitalize the bank and allow it to remain open and operating."

Valeant CDS Hits Record High As Company Scrambles To Avoid Default

Suddenly, what was until incomprehensible - a Valeant default - appears all too likely: under its loan agreements, Valeant has until March 30 to file audited financial reports. If it fails to do so, it then has 30 days before lenders can demand accelerated repayment. Needless to say, Valeant would be unable to fund such a loan acceleration without rapidly selling off key assets in a liquidation firesale, although there even exist limits on just how many assets Valeant can sell.

Frontrunning: March 16

  • Trump knocks Rubio out of race, Republicans in turmoil (Reuters)
  • Fed to Signal Worst Is Over, Hikes Coming: Decision-Day Guide (BBG)
  • Four Economists See a Surprise from the Fed This Week (BBG)
  • Global Stocks Muted Ahead of Fed Announcement (WSJ)
  • Stop-Trump Groups Make One Last Bet on Rubio, and Lose (BBG)
  • China's Li Seeks 'Win-Win' for Growth-Reform Plan Analysts Doubt (BBG)

Why Negative Rates Can't Stop the Coming Depression

The logic of lowering rates below zero is so boneheaded that only a PhD could believe it. It’s all relative, you see. It’s like standing on a train platform. The train next to you backs up…and you feel you’re moving ahead. Negative interest rates are like backing up. They give borrowers the illusion of forward motion... even if the economy is standing still.

The "Terrifying Prospect" Of A Triumph Of Politics Over Economics

All of life’s odds aren’t 3:2, but that’s how you’re supposed to bet, or so they say. They are not saying that so much anymore, or saying that history rhymes, or that nothing’s new under the sun. More and more 'they's seem to be figuring out that past economic and market experiences can’t be extrapolated forward - a terrifying prospect for the social and political order.