Creditors

Sprott Money's picture

Rinse and repeat, rinse and repeat, that’s the story of the ongoing financial crisis that surrounds Greece.

Greece, once again, is staring over the edge into the abyss and is facing imminent financial default, possible collapse and a system breakdown. That is, unless they can once again pull a rabbit out of their hat and stave off disaster for just one more month.

Greece: Out Of Cash, Out Of Time, Out Of Options

Most commentary still appears predicated on the idea that there will be some last-minute deal - either because the creditors will back down and give Greece some more money without requiring it to be paid back or because the Greek government will back down if it understands that not doing so would ultimately mean leaving the euro. On the other hand, some believe neither side is particularly interested in achieving a deal.

Tspiras Says "Don't Worry" About IMF Payment After Latest Failure To Clinch Deal

Following this evening's "private" meeting with Jean-Claude Juncker and Jeroem Dijsselbloem, Greek PM Alexis Tsipras once again admits that there is no deal. Both sides issued statements - The EU's was a 3 sentence boiler-plate; and Tsipras was a brief press conference on Greek TV. In the interests of clarity we provide the statements (and their actual translations from "we have nothing to say" to "this is what we are trying not to say.")

Greece Admits It Will Not Make IMF Payment On Friday, No Deal Expected Wednesday

"Greece will not make a June 5 repayment to the International Monetary Fund if there is no prospect of an aid-for-reforms deal with its international creditors soon," Reuters reports. PM Alexis Tsipras will meet with European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker Wednesday evening, but no deal is expected today.

Frontrunning: June 3

  • Obama signs bill reforming surveillance program (Reuters)
  • Tsipras to meet Juncker in Brussels for talks on agreement (AFP)
  • Spot the irony: OECD cuts global growth forecast, says recovery taking hold (Reuters)
  • The Secret Money Behind Vladimir Putin's War Machine (BBG)
  • Companies' Borrowing Spree Darkens Stock Market Future (BBG)
  • How OPEC Hurt Big Oil (WSJ)
  • What's OPEC Going to Do With Iran's Million Barrels a Day? (BBG)
  • Draghi’s Europe Looks Healthiest for Years Despite Greece (BBG)
  • Bund yields inch higher, euro holds ahead of ECB (Reuters)

Futures Rise, Bund Rout Pauses On "Cautious Optimism" Ahead Of Greek Endgame

With the Greek IMF payment just 48 hours away, and Europe having submitted its best and final offer to Greece in a battle of "deal proposals", today Greek PM Tsipras will meet with European Commission President Juncker to discuss the recently submitted reform proposals by the Greek premier. However, a Greek government spokesman says that Greek PM Tsipras will not meet Eurogroup's Dijsselbloem despite several reports suggesting that they would do so later today. Last night it was reported that the EU, ECB, IMF agreed on terms for a cash-for-reform plan to be presented to Greece. However, a senior EU official has said that they are concerned that the stringent measures of the proposal could be met with rejection by Greece.

Chinese Stocks Stumble As Hanergy Debt Debacle Looms Over All The 500%-Club

If one sentence sums up the farce that the hyper-speculative ponzifest that is the 500% club in China it is "Hanergy Group was basically using the listed company as a means to produce collateral in the form of shares that it could then pledge to secure financing." While the stock has been cut in half, lenders remain mired in opacity as they try to figure out, as Bloomberg reports, which of Chinese billionaire Li Hejun's many creditors risk losing every yuan they put into his company? Shenzhen and CHINEXT indices are lower out of the gate today after a 14% and 18% surge in the last 2 days as a group of 11 lenders (ranging from large banks to small asset managers) ask for a meeting to discuss various loans with various Hanergy entities... and whatever they find in Hanergy is bound to have been repeated manifold across China's manic markets.

The Defaults Continue In China As Duck Producer Sinks

Over the past several months we’ve seen at least three examples of Chinese defaults including Baoding Tianwei Group, a subsidiary of state-owned parent China South Industries. This suggests Beijing will begin to take a more hands-off approach when it comes to propping up borrowers. The latest example is a profitable duck processing company, which FT says has defaulted on its debts after banks refused to roll over its loans.

Greece Breaks America's Heart, Will Sign MOU With Russia For Gas Pipeline

Greece has received what The New York Times recently described as “dueling sales pitches” on two proposed natural gas pipelines, with the US pressing Athens to support The Southern Gas Corridor rather than Gazprom's Turkish Stream project. It appears Moscow may have made the more convincing case because, much to Washington's dismay, Greece is set to sign an MOU for the Greek portion of The Turkish Stream pipeline in June.

Sprott Money's picture

As has been noted frequently in the past, most of the business news posted by the mainstream media is a collection of economic fairy-tales which utterly pervert what is actually taking place, most particularly with respect to reporting on the Western bloc. Occasionally, however, we will get some sort of mild, pseudo-confession, which gives us just a glimpse of the economic carnage in these once-prosperous/once-affluent societies.