Creditors

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Shanghai Gold Exchange volume climbed to a record today as prices declined incentivizing value driven Chinese buyers as Chinese stocks crashed 7.4%. Chinese stocks have had the biggest two-week loss in more than 18 years and are close to entering a bear market after extending losses from their June 12 peak to 19 percent in less than three weeks.

Frontrunning: June 26

  • Chinese Stock Plunge Leaves State Media Speechless (BBG)
  • China’s Market Selloff Accelerates (WSJ)
  • Any Deal on New Greek Bailout Funds Put Off Until Weekend (WSJ)
  • ECB keeps ELA funding limit for Greece unchanged for third day in a row (Reuters)
  • Impoverished Greek City Stands With Alexis Tsipras (WSJ)
  • Why It Won’t Be a Default If Greece Misses IMF Payment Next Week (BBG)
  • Valeant Makes Takeover Approach to Zoetis (WSJ) - or how Ackman assures himself another good T+3 quarter
  • Obamacare ruling puts Supreme Court on hot seat in U.S. presidential race (Reuters)

China Plunges Most Since 2007, Points Away From Bear Market; Greek Drama Continues

Following yesterday's furious market drop in Chinese stocks, just before the overnight open, Morgan Stanley came out with a much distributed report urging investors "Not to buy this dip", and so they didn't. As a result, the Shanghai Composite imploded, at one point trading down 8% while the Chinext and Shenzhen markets crashed even more. This was the single biggest Shanghai Composite one-day drop since 2007, and with a close at 4192.87 the SHCOMP is now on the verge of a bear market, down 19% from its June 12 highs. China's second largest market, Shenzhen, is now officially in a bear market.

Grexident Looming: Eurogroup Meeting Ends Prematurely With No Deal

Following meetings with EU officials and then with IMF chief Christine Lagarde and ECB chief Mario Draghi on Wednesday evening, Greek PM Alexis Tsipras is back at it on Thursday, in a frantic attempt to salvage a deal with creditors. He'll need to win over EU finance chiefs (who are collectively losing their will to keep Greece in the currency bloc) and the IMF as the EU summit kicks off in Brussels.

Frontrunning: June 25

  • This headline needs updating: Creditors set bailout ultimatum for defiant Greeks (Reuters)
  • Greece’s Fragile Banks Leave Alexis Tsipras Few Options in Bailout Talks (WSJ)
  • Dueling Greece Plans Presented as Ministers Race for Aid Deal (BBG)
  • Icahn Cashes In His Netflix Chips (WSJ)
  • Meet the Health-Law Holdouts: Americans Who Prefer to Go Uninsured (WSJ)
  • ECB holds Athens lifeline unchanged as Bundesbank protests (Reuters)
  • Supreme Court Guide: Six Big Decisions Remain (WSJ)
  • The Rise of the Compliance Guru—and Banker Ire (BBG)
GoldCore's picture

- We need a free market in currencies, not bail-ins and a war on cash and gold - People blindly trust “experts” so welcome that some of them giving prudent advice regarding diversification - Currencies of creditor nations – Norway, Switzerland, Singapore, Hong Kong will outperform in long term

Saxobank CIO Explains Why The Greek 'Problem' Won't Be Solved

"Even if a deal between Greece and its creditors is struck, the problem isn't solved," warns Saxobank CIO Steen Jakobsen, which leaves the door open to a snap election being called shortly and a referendum on continued membership of the EU just weeks later. Debt refinancing will be the first issue, with the country needing a significant discount. But how can the country secure that, asks Jakobsen, when the government is unwilling to bring in significant reforms?

Buy Programs Stumble After Greek Deal Proposal Goes Back To Drawing Board In Last Minute

And it started off all so well: the market, blissfully ignoring what we wrote just yesterday in Why The IMF Will Reject The Latest Greek Proposal In Just Two Numbers, was in full blown levitation mode overnight when it sent Japanese stocks to their highest close since 1996 (pre dot com) and with the Chinese central bank doing its best to keep levitating local stocks away from the abyss, pushing the SHCOMP up another 2.5%. Euro Stoxx 50 went from flat to down 1% and is bouncing. As BBG's Richard Breslow adds, predictably, the market is taking this as a ploy, not an end game. Of course, this is precisely the "Bear Stearns is fine" conventional wisdom that Cramer was spewing days before Bear failed because nobody could fathom how anyone can conceive of a worst case scenario. Only it isn't nobody: we reported before of a Goldman's "Conspiracy Theory" Stunner: A Greek Default Is Precisely What The ECB Wants. 

"No Deal": Tsipras Says Creditors Did Not Accept Greek Proposal

Who could have possibly foreseen that the IMF would throw up all over the Greek "proposal"... aside from this post here "Why The IMF Will Reject The Latest Greek Proposal In Just Two Numbers" yesterday afternoon of course. In any event, moments ago Bloomberg reported that just as we wrote here yesterday afternoon, there is no deal and that Greek PM Alexis Tsipras told his associates that creditors not accepting equivalent fiscal measures has never happened before, according to a Greek govt official, who asked not to be named in line with policy. Creditors “not accepting parametric measures has never happened before. Neither in Ireland, nor in Portugal, nor anywhere. This strange stance can hide two scenarios; they either don’t want an agreement or serve specific interests in Greece.”

The Ultimate Moral Hazard: 70% of Greek Mortgages Are In Default

Just as we warned earlier in the year, total uncertainty about the future of Greece has enabled a growing sense of moral hazard as "if the nation doesn't pay its debt, why should we" sweeps across the troubled nation. As Greeks' tax remittances to the government, which were almost non-existent to begin with, have ground to a halt, so The FT reports, so-called 'strategic defaults' have become a way of life among Greece's formerly affluent middle-class..."I still owe money on the car and motorboat I can’t afford to use. Even a holiday loan I’d forgotten about...I’m living with my mother looking for work and waiting for the bank to come up with another restructuring offer."