Creditors

Greece, Troika Submit Conflicting Eleventh Hour Deal Proposals

Both Greece and the troika are said to have devised their own version of a 'final' offer in bailout negotiations, with WSJ saying creditors have prepared a draft agreement for PM Alexis Tsipras to either accept or not. The question now seems to be: how much will the Greek PM have to cede and what does that mean for the Greek government?

Frontrunning: June 2

  • Greece, creditors exchanging documents to reach deal - Commission (Reuters)
  • Greece’s Creditors Reach Consensus on Proposal to Athensa (WSJ)
  • Greece calls on lenders to accept 'realistic' plan sent on Monday (Reuters)
  • Hundreds missing, many elderly tourists, after ship capsizes on China's Yangtze (Reuters)
  • Oil up ahead of OPEC meeting as dollar slips (Reuters)
  • U.S. Met Secretly With Yemen Rebels (WSJ)
  • Euro zone back to inflation as May prices beat forecast (Reuters)
  • Patients Get Extreme to Obtain Hepatitis Drug That's 1% the Cost Outside U.S. (BBG)

Futures Slide Then Rebound On Endless "Unnamed Source" Greek Chatter, Dollar Slides; China Surges

Once again it's all about Greece, with the latest iteration of a "Greek deal is imminent" rumor making the rounds and, just like yesterday, sending futures in the green, just a little over an hour after the increasingly more illiquid E-mini future has slid 0.7%. The EUR, where the bulk of Virtu headline kneejerk reacting algos are to be found, has surged over 100 pips overnight on more hope and optimism.

Here's What Happens When Your City Is Cut To Junk

Last month, Chicago saw its debt cut to junk at Moody's, triggering billions in accelerated payment rights and jeopardizing efforts to improve the city's finances in the face of a budget gap that's set to triple over three years. Citi has more on the dreaded "downgrade feedback loop."

Greece Abandons "Red Lines" As Troika Meets In Berlin To Craft "Deal"

We have long argued that the most likely endgame for Greece is that PM Tsipras caves to the troika, compromises on the government’s ‘red lines’ and risks a government reshuffle on the way to a third program, thus averting a euro exit and keeping Greece from descending into a drachma death spiral, even as the “solution” effectively strips the Greek people of their right to choose how they want to be governed — a tragically absurd outcome in what is the birthplace of democracy. It now appears that scenario is set to unfold.

Futures Soar On Latest "Greece Fixed" Rumor; Forget To Drop On Rumor Denial

It wouldn't be the new normal without a "Greek deal imminent" rumor/headline and so after overnight China-based strength gave way to selling pressure, another twitter-based rumor of "chatter" of a Greek accord (which given yesterday's comments seems extremely unlikely anyway) sparked a malt-up in EURUSD and US Equity futures. However, as is always the case, Virtu's algos as usual forgot to sell when the official denial occurred just a few minutes later.

Frontrunning: June 1

  • Senate lets NSA spy program lapse, at least for now (Reuters)
  • Draghi Deflation Relief Means Little With Greek Threat Unsolved (BBG)
  • Tepid factory data add to Asian gloom (FT)
  • Citigroup Likely to Close Banamex USA (WSJ)
  • Frugality of High Earners in U.S. Shows Long Shadow of Recession (BBG)
  • Greece’s Tsipras Warns Bell May Toll for Europe (BBG)
  • Carnegie Mellon Reels After Uber Lures Away Researchers (WSJ)
  • Romário leads drive for Brazilian probe into Fifa (FT)
  • Faster than China? India's road, rail drive could lay doubts to rest (Reuters)

Futures Flat With Greece In The Spotlight; China Boomerangs Higher

Remember China's 6% crash last week? It is now a distant memory made even more remote thanks to the latest batch of ugly data out of China, coupled with hints of even more liquidity injections, which led to the latest surge in the Shcomp, an index that has put most pennystocks to shame. In Europe, the big story remains Greece, and as everyone expected, the doomed country and its creditors failed to make a deal on Sunday. This is after Greek Officials were said to have prepared a draft agreement, which was expected to be announced on Sunday. Not helping things, Greek PM Tsipras came out in fully defiant mode and accused bailout monitors of making “absurd” demands and seeking to impose “harsh punishment” on Athens. A bunch of final PMI number showed a modest improvement in the periphery at the expense of Germany whose deterioration is starting to be a concern.

Defiant Tsipras Warns European Leaders They Are "Making A Grave Mistake"

On Sunday, PM Alexis Tsipras penned a lengthy statement expressing his frustration at creditors’ insistence on presenting what he calls “absurd proposals” even as the Greek delegation has gone most of the way towards meeting the troika’s demands. "Judging from the present circumstances, it appears that this new European power is being constructed, with Greece being the first victim. To some, this represents a golden opportunity to make an example out of Greece. If some, however, think or want to believe that this decision concerns only Greece, they are making a grave mistake. I would suggest that they re-read Hemingway’s masterpiece, 'For Whom the Bell Tolls.'"

The Pressure Just Shifted From Greece To The US & EU

Countries like Spain and Portugal may by now scratch their heads about taking a hard line on the Greek issue. They may not have fully realized to what extent the eurozone is indeed a shared commitment. All eurozone nations now have at least another 30 days to think that over. The main risk in that period is that Greece may decide to leave on its own.

Sunday Deal Deadline Dies As Greece Prepares Desperate "Draft" Plan

Greece and its creditors are set to miss a self-imposed Sunday deal deadline as talks are still ongoing, an unnamed official tells Reuters. Meanwhile, Kathimerini says "government officials attending an emergency summit under Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras on Saturday prepared a draft agreement as Greek sources cited by the Athens-Macedonia News Agency indicated that negotiators in Brussels were close to a deal on value added tax, curbing early retirements and the gradual merging of pension funds." And so it continues.