CRFB

Weekend Reading: Tax Cut Wish List

"It is a simple function of math. But the following chart shows why this has likely come to the inevitable conclusion, and why tax cuts and reforms are unlikely to spur higher rates of economic growth..."

The “Trump Tax Plan” - Details & Analysis

Trump's "historic" tax bill, as proposed today, will likely look very different by the time it is actually voted on. However, as is always the case, the “devil is in the details." Here are the notable highlights...

Trump Tax Cuts To Add As Much As $7 Trillion In Debt

"Based on what we know so far, the plan could cost $3 to $7 trillion over a decade– our base-case estimate is $5.5 trillion in revenue loss over a decade.... a $5.5 trillion tax plan would be enough to increase debt to 111 percent of Gross Domestic Product (compared to 89 percent of GDP in CBO's baseline) by 2027."

How We Got Here In One Sentence

In every annual budget debate since the 1980s, one side figures out that the way to get what it wants – which is higher spending – is to frame the request in a particular, ingenious way: We have to borrow and spend way more now if we want to borrow and spend way less later.

CRFB Calculates What Donald Trump's Revised Tax Plan Will Do To US Debt

Moments ago the CRFB scored Trump's adjusted proposal, and found that as a result of the revisions to his tax plan, total US debt would increase by only $2.55 trillion over a decade, nearly five times less than his original proposal, and certainly a far more realistic number to pitch to America's conservatives.

Boehner v Reid Proposals: A Compare And Contrast Cheat Sheet

If anyone actually cares, the Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget has released the following handy summary cheat sheet which compares and contrast the key aspects of the Boehner and Reid proposals. We suggest nobody spend more than 2 seconds skimming through these as both will be vastly reworked by the end of trading today.

The CRFB Sees Locusts, Plagues And Lots And Lots Of Budget "Impossibilities" In America's Future

"This situation is economically impossible; at some point, U.S. debt would reach a level so high that creditors would stop lending us money. The question, though, is how the situation will be resolved. Will politicians confront the policy choices or delay them to the point where they will be forced upon us due to a fiscal crisis? The longer we wait to take on these issues, the worse they will get and the more painful it will be to change course." - CRFB