• williambanzai7
    01/25/2015 - 14:27
    A Banzai7 salute to the Greeks for signaling the bankster $hitheads of the world (and their Eurocrat enablers) to shove it where the sun don't shine.

Crude

Tyler Durden's picture

Late-Day Equity Ramp But European Bonds Ain't Buying It





Between the escalation in the Middle East and Olli Rehn pouring cold-water on the hopes and prayers of an imminent Spanish rescue-request, sovereign bond risk rose notably today. A late-day rampapalooza in EURUSD (another round of end-of-day repatriation?) signaled risk-on in the correlated monkeys and sure enough (in the US and Europe) stocks rose into the European close. The USD is remarkably unchanged on the week - despite the volatility in risk assets in general (zee stabilitee at the 1.27 peg seems the new normal) - as the Fed/ECB 'agreement' appears to have crushed the life out of yet another market-based signal - as EURUSD implied vol crashes to five-year lows.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

China Gold Reserves “Too Small” - Ensure “National Economic and Financial Safety”





China needs to add to its gold reserves to ensure national economic and financial safety, promote yuan globalization and as a hedge against foreign- reserve risks, Gao Wei, an official from the Department of International Economic Affairs of Ministry of Foreign Affairs, writes in a commentary in the China Securities Journal today which was reported on by Bloomberg. China’s gold reserve is “too small”, Gao said and while gold prices are currently near record highs, China can build its reserves by buying low and selling high amid the short-term volatility, Gao wrote. The People’s Bank of China is accumulating significant volumes of gold under the radar of many less informed market participants which is bullish. The Chinese government is secretive about its gold diversification and buying and does not disclose gold purchases to the IMF. Therefore, there has been no official update to their holdings since the barely reported upon announcement four years ago that Chinese gold reserves had risen from just over 500 tonnes to over 1,000 tonnes.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Frontrunning: November 14





  • Don't jump to conclusions over general, Pentagon chief says (Reuters)
  • Bad times for generals: Pentagon demotes 4-star General Ward (Reuters)
  • Investors Pay to Lend Germany Money (WSJ)
  • Noda will no longer be watching... watching: Japan PM honors pledge with December 16 vote date, to lose job (Reuters)
  • New China leadership takes shape (FT)
  • Hispanic Workers Lack Education as Numbers Grow in U.S. (Bloomberg)
  • Quest for EU single bank supervisor stumbles (FT)
  • Anti-austerity strikes sweep Europe (Reuters)
  • Amazon faces new obstacles in fight for holiday dollars (Reuters)
  • SEC Expands Knight Probe (WSJ)
  • Singapore’s Casinos Lose Luster as Gaming Revenue Decline (Bloomberg)
  • Amid Petraeus sex scandal, Air Force to release abuse report (Reuters)
  • Geithner’s Money Fund Overhaul Push Sparks New Opposition (Bloomberg)
 
Tyler Durden's picture

Frontrunning: November 13





  • The Bild is now a source for EURUSD stop hunts: Germany eyes 'bundled' loan payment to Greece-paper (Reuters, Bloomberg)
  • Congress comes back Tuesday to confront “fiscal cliff.”  (Reuters)
  • Gen. John Allen ensnared in Petraeus scandal (Politico)
  • FBI Agent in Petraeus Case Under Scrutiny (WSJ)
  • Comcast's NBCUniversal unit lays off 500 employees (Reuters)
  • University Fees Stoke U.K. Inflation (WSJ)
  • Consumers Closing Wallets in Japan Add to Noda’s Woes (Bloomberg)
  • John McAfee Wanted for Murder... and explaining bathsalt anal suppositories (Gizmodo)
  • Europe Gives Greece 2 More Years to Reach Deficit Targets (Bloomberg)
  • Where Spain Is Worse Than Greece (WSJ)
  • Microsoft's Windows unit head, once a possible CEO, exits (Reuters)
  • Glitch stops NYSE trading in 216 companies (FT)
  • Large European Banks Stash Cash (WSJ)
  • The death of San Bernardino: How a vicious circle of self-interest sank California city (Reuters)
  • Apple stores most productive US shops (FT)
  • Treasuries See U.S. Falling Over Cliff as Yields Converge (Bloomberg)
  • Bra-Bodysuits Make H&M One Hit Wonder as Zara Prospers (Bloomberg)
 
Tyler Durden's picture

Daily US Opening News And Market Re-Cap: November 12





Another day another sell-off…with equity markets in Europe trending steadily lower after it was reported that the decision on Greek aid will not be taken during the Eurogroup meeting scheduled for November 12. Still, EU official said that there will be no Greek default on November 16th (EUR 4.1bln redemptions) and that this redemption is to be "factored in" decision on disbursement. Separately,  analysts at Fitch rating agency noted that while current Spain’s rating is appropriate, further action would more likely than not be to sub-investment grade. Moody’s also commented on the never-ending sovereign debt crisis today, stating that actions taken by the ECB only buying time for Euro region and that a decision on France will be communicated within a few weeks. As a result, bond and credit spreads widen further today, with SP/GE 10s spread at 450 level, which is of particular importance given that this is the level at which the LCH begins to review bonds for margin requirements. Deterioration in Italian paper was linked to next week’s supply. In turn, EUR/USD and GBP/USD trended lower, with the USD index up 0.12% at last check. Going forward, market participants will get to digest the release of the latest U. Michigan Survey (Nov P), as well as macro forecasts from Philadelphia Fed.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Spot The Start Of The End Of The Keynesian Dream





Presented with little comment, but while there are numerous reasons for elevated oil prices (from short-term supply disruptions, middle-east tensions, and emerging-market demand) it appears something broke in Q1 2009 between a proxy for world trade (or indeed for ship-building mal-investment in hope-driven excesses continuing) and the cost of fulfilling that demand. After 25 years of credit-driven Keynesian (monetary-to-fiscal-policy reach-around) planning, it would appear it is different this time as the potential for infinite supply of fiat currency clashes with the 'finite' supply of hard assets (crude oil in this case)... Much as we question who gained from Draghi's first year of action in Europe, we suggest this chart clarifies who did not benefit from Bernanke's experimentation...

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Daily US Opening News And Market Re-Cap: November 9





Another day another sell-off…with equity markets in Europe trending steadily lower after it was reported that the decision on Greek aid will not be taken during the Eurogroup meeting scheduled for November 12. Still, EU official said that there will be no Greek default on November 16th (EUR 4.1bln redemptions) and that this redemption is to be "factored in" decision on disbursement. Separately, analysts at Fitch rating agency noted that while current Spain’s rating is appropriate, further action would more likely than not be to sub-investment grade. Moody’s also commented on the never-ending sovereign debt crisis today, stating that actions taken by the ECB only buying time for Euro region and that a decision on France will be communicated within a few weeks. As a result, bond and credit spreads widen further today, with SP/GE 10s spread at 450 level, which is of particular importance given that this is the level at which the LCH begins to review bonds for margin requirements. Deterioration in Italian paper was linked to next week’s supply. In turn, EUR/USD and GBP/USD trended lower, with the USD index up 0.12% at last check. Going forward, market participants will get to digest the release of the latest U. Michigan Survey (Nov P), as well as macro forecasts from Philadelphia Fed.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Daily US Opening News And Market Re-Cap: November 8





European equities have made tentative progress this morning, led by the technology and basic materials sectors. The European morning was relatively peaceful until a flurry of activity on the back of European sources commenting that Spain are unlikely to seek ESM aid until the end of the year, and the ECB are not in a rush to commence bond-buying using their OMT facility. The delay of expectations of purchases has taken its toll on the Spanish debt markets which, despite completing their 2012 issuance smoothly today, show signs of strain as the 10yr yield breaches 5.81%, and the yield spread approaches 450bps against the German benchmark – the level at which LCH begin to review margin requirements. The pain in Spain has also impacted the EUR currency, with the major EUR/USD pair printing a two-month low of 1.2720 this morning.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Daily US Opening News And Market Re-Cap: November 6





Less than impressive macro data from the Eurozone failed to depress investor sentiment and as such, equity markets in Europe traded higher as market participants looked forward to US elections. Heading into the North American open, all ten equity sectors are seen in the green, with technology and financial stocks leading the pack. Still, despite the choppy price action and lack of progress on the much desired Spanish bailout, peripheral bond yield spreads are tighter, with SP/GE and IT/GE tighter by c. 6bps. EUR/USD failed to break below 1.2750 barrier level earlier in the session and since then stages an impressive recovery, partly helped by weaker macro data from the UK.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Frontrunning: November 6





  • Obama-Romney: Breaking the Tie (BBG)
  • Fiscal cliff looms over campaign climax (FT)
  • Tough Calls on Deficit Await the Winner (WSJ)
  • Election Likely to Leave Housing Unmoved (WSJ)
  • Regulator Investigating Rochdale Trading (WSJ)
  • Greeks Plan Strikes On Eve of Votes (WSJ)
  • China Communists consider internal democratic reform (Reuters)
  • Wen urges Asia-Europe co-op to promote world economy (China Daily)
  • Italy Said to Reject Bad Bank That May Boost Ties to Sovereign (BBG)
  • IMF warning adds to French economy fears (FT)
  • Europe, Central Bank Spar Over Athens Aid (WSJ)
  • Unlimited Lending May Help Weaken the Yen, BOJ Official Says (BBG)
  • PBOC Official Says U.S. Election Won’t Impact Yuan Level (BBG) - Just the USD level to which it is pegged
 
Tyler Durden's picture

Guest Post: Is Canada's Housing Bubble 'Different'?





Canadian household debt as a percentage of income by now vastly exceeds the peak that was seen at the height of the US real estate bubble. CIBC thinks the huge amount of household debt in Canada and the beginning cracks in the housing bubble are nothing to worry about. The main reason for this benign assessment seems to be that there have been a few other credit and real estate bubbles in the world that have grown even bigger than the US one before it burst. What a relief. It is generally held that Canada's banking system is in ruddy health and not in danger from the extended credit and real estate bubble, mainly because a government-owned organization, Canadian Mortgage Housing Corp. This kind of thinking has things exactly the wrong way around. It is precisely because such a state-owned guarantor of mortgages exists that the vaunted lending standards of Canada's banks have increasingly gone out of the window as the bubble has grown.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Daily US Opening News And Market Re-Cap: November 5





Equity markets kick started the week on a negative footing, with the troubled Iberian giant back in focus after it was reported that the ECB is checking whether it may have contravened its own strict rules by lending to Spanish banks on overly generous terms, an ECB spokesman said on Sunday. According to press reports, Spanish banks had borrowed funds from the ECB at a preferential interest rate of 0.5% even though the creditworthiness of the T-bills they provide as collateral should have required them to pay 5.5%. The never-ending Greek drama is another factor for the risk-averse sentiment, with only weeks before the country runs out of cash and still no evidence that lawmakers will find a solution to diffuse the situation, there is a risk of another speculative attack on weaker EU states. As a result, credit and bond yield spreads widened, led by Italian and Spanish bonds, both wider by around 9bps in 10s. Despite the evident distress in credit markets, EUR/GBP is essentially flat, with GBP underperforming following the lacklustre PMI report from the UK.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Guest Post: China 'Addicted To Credit'





Whilst the economic data shows at least some signs of an anaemic turnaround, China’s corporate results are demonstrating just how difficult things have been. During a slowdown, it is common for payments to be delayed as everyone hangs on to cash. Some companies, though, can be tempted to avoid curtailing production by offering reluctant customers much easier credit to encourage sales, the hope being that the slump will soon end and “natural” demand will pick up again. The trouble of course is that if the slowdown is prolonged, or the recovery weaker than expected, these accounts receivable (A/R) might turn “un-receivable”, and thus have to be written down as losses.  An increase in A/R is expected, but such a large increase suggests that some companies have been staying in operations through this vendor financing. In the struggling coal sector, at the end of June, accounts receivable had jumped 52.8 % for the 90 biggest coal firms. The need for a stronger turnaround is becoming more and more urgent!

 

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Stocks Slammed As Apple Tumbles: Yesterday's Rally In Tatters





What a roundtrip! After starting off November with a bang, and after nearly retracing all October losses in the aftermath of the NFP headfake in less than 2 trading sessions, the S&P futures literally imploded, and dropped 23 points from the intraday high, the same distance traveled as it crossed yesterday, only to the downside and on very strong volume for the second day in a row. While the 1400 support in ES is once again in play (ES closed literally on the lows of the session at 1405.5), as we suggested earlier, the far more ominous news is that the AAPL bubble appears to have popped (but, but, it is so cheap on forward multiple basis: guess what - forward multiples are based on forward earnings, which may very well never materialize! and thanks to the dividend, not even AAPL's cash hoard is the bastion it one was) and is now close to entering bear market territory, down just shy of 20% from its all time highs of $705.07 hit on September 12. Now with the 200 DMA taken out, the next support is the 20% retracement from the high which is at $564. After that it is freefall for a long time as a very deep gap needs filling. It is unclear just how much of the selling was there to cause max pain for Dick Bove and Rochdale, for whom every tick lower in the stock means a bigger margin call.Finally, news hitting literally seconds ago that MSFT may be launching its own phone if its partner strategy falters, means there go even more margins.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Barclays Fined Record Amount For Channelling Enron, Manipulating California's Electricity Market





It just is not Barclays' year. After being exposed (so far the only one) as a ringleader in a massive LIBOR-rigging scandal which cost Bob Diamond his job, yesterday the British bank added insult to injury, after the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) fined it $470 million - the largest penalty ever levied by the energy regulator, and even larger than the bank's LIBOR fine - for getting caught doing what Enron got caught doing about a decade ago: manipulating California's electricity markets. Although while the former ended up being the biggest corporate bankruptcy at the time, led to the end of one of the nation's largest auditors and sparked a scandal so great it was all corporate America spoke for about for the next year, this time the news has come and gone, and nobody cares. Perhaps this is to be expected: in a time when none other than the central bank intervenes each and every day in every single market to preserve the "wealth effect", habituation to epic corporate manipulation of every imaginable kind is perfectly normal.

 
Syndicate content
Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!