Czech

Tyler Durden's picture

Key Events And Issues In The Coming Week





Looking ahead, Thursday will be a busy day with the ECB (plus Draghi’s press conference) and BoE meetings. Some are expecting the ECB to cut rates as early at this week although most believe the rate cut will not happen until December. Draghi will likely deflect the exchange rate’s relevance via its  impact on inflation forecasts. This could strengthen the credibility of the forward guidance message, but this is just rhetoric — a rate cut would require a rejection of the current recovery hypothesis. They expect more focus on low inflation at this press conference, albeit without pre-empting the ECB staff new macroeconomic forecasts that will be published in December.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

How Europe's "Benefits" Stack Up To The US Entitlement Society





With an increasing focus in America on the ever growing entitlement society, we thought it might be useful to get some context of how the welfare states stack up across Europe. As Britain prepares to "test" immigrants in an effort to stymie "benefit tourists", The Telegraph's Ed Malnick, details what health care and child, unemployment and housing benefit a 30-year-old single EU migrant with a child but no job can access in each member state.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Frontrunning: October 17





  • Congress Vote Ends Impasse to Be Revisited in January (BBG); Congress Passes Debt, Budget Deal (WSJ)
  • House GOP extracts no concessions (Politico)
  • Washington becomes the biggest risk to the U.S. economy (Reuters)
  • Debt Deal Seen Boosting U.S. Consumers as Holidays Approach (BBG) - only thing missing: disposable income
  • Federal Employees Head Back to Work (WSJ)
  • Regulator Suggested Shift for Dimon at J.P. Morgan Unit (WSJ)
  • Twitter hires Google ad exec ahead of IPO (CNET)
  • Teens can now post publicly, but posts are friends-only by default (WaPo)
  • Germany Moves to Finalize Coalition Deal (WSJ)
  • Draghi Turns Judge on EU Banks as ECB Studies Accounts (BBG)
  • UK nuclear deal with China a ‘new dawn’ (FT)
 
Tyler Durden's picture

Key Events And Issues In The Coming Week





While the ongoing government shutdown, now in its second week, means even more macro data will be retained by the random number generators, central banks are up and running. This means that in the upcoming week the key event will be the release of the FOMC minutes from the last meeting at which the Fed surprised almost the entire market by not tapering asset purchases as effectively pre-announced.  There are MPC meetings in the UK, Brazil, South Korea and Indonesia. The main focus, however, will be on the US political situation still. Data that will most likely be delayed this week includes the US Trade balance, JOLTs, Wholesale and Business inventories, Retail sales, PPI, Import Prices, and the Monthly Federal budget.

 
Pivotfarm's picture

Crisis is Literal Kiss of Death





The financial crisis of 2008 killed a lot of things. It killed the line of credit, it killed the finances of millions of people around the world, it ousted governments and relegated leaders to the back offices and it was the kiss of death to a failed system and brought down entire states.

 
GoldCore's picture

Gold Analysts Bullish Due To Money Creation On Scale Never Seen In History





‘Tapering’ may be put off indefinitely due to the very fragile state of the massively indebted U.S. economy. This means that interest rates must be kept low for as long as possible, leading to money printing and electronic money creation on a scale never before seen in history.

This will inevitably lead to higher gold prices - the question is when rather than if. 

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Key Events And Issues In The Coming Week





Following the FOMC surprise, no less than twelve Fed speeches will provide some "clarifications" on where the Fed now stands. It is very likely that this subject will continue to dominate the discussions of market participants. At the same time, US data will get scrutinized after the recent weakening and to see how warranted the Fed's concerns were. Two US consumer sentiment surveys, durable goods orders, and the third reading of Q2 GDP are important. In addition, monthly consumption and income data for August provide more information on the third quarter and of course there will be interest in the latest weekly claims numbers after some distortions in recent readings.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Key Events And Issues In The Coming Week





In the US, retail sales on Friday will be the main data release. In addition, Congress will return from its 5-week recess on Monday and will likely keep their focus on Syria this week. Finally, San Francisco Fed President Williams (who does not vote on FOMC policy this year) will speak on Monday. Last week, Williams argued that the FOMC should maintain its focus on the unemployment rate, despite its limitations. After Friday's employment report saw the unemployment rate drop again due to falling participation, this issue is likely to resurface. The Fed's communication blackout period begins on Tuesday so Williams will be the last FOMC speaker before the September meeting ends on the 18th.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Frontrunning: August 22





  • SURPRISE - Goldman Sachs won a preliminary victory to limit losses from a wave of erroneous trades that roiled U.S. options markets (WSJ)
  • HP’s Whitman abandons 2014 revenue growth target (FT) - just keep doing those buybacks and ignore CapEx: revenue growth estimated in 2022
  • Republicans in Echo Before Big Burn Defy Affordable Care (BBG)
  • China's banks to take next step in rate reform push  (Reuters)
  • Berlin’s Consistency on Greece’s Rescue (FT) and lack thereof
  • Summers as Obama Voice of Authority Rides Car Rescue in Fed Race (BBG)
  • Cuomo in Manure Fight as New York Promotes Yogurt (BBG)
  • Yellen’s Ties From London to Shanghai Bypass White House (BBG)
  • Sanctions Gap Allows China to Import Iranian Oil (WSJ)
 
Tyler Durden's picture

Key Events And Issues In The Coming Week





The middle of the month brings a mixture of second-tier macro numbers punctuated by the market-moving (and Taper-cementing) retail sales report. We get IP, CPI and PPI from the US this coming week. In terms of hard activity numbers, US retail sales on Tuesday will be the highlight which as a reminder is, in addition to Jackson Hole, seen as one of two key pre-Taper catalysts to keep an eye on. Outside the US, the key data will be the quarterly publication of German, French and Eurozone GDP, as well as Japanese GDP, which has already been released (weaker real growth, higher inflation). The second week of the month also tends to show the first survey results with the Phily Fed and Empire surveys on Thursday. In Germany the ZEW will come on Tuesday. Finally, from an FX point of view, we will be focused on balance of payments related data, with the trade balance in India and TIC data in the US. After a few very weak TIC releases in recent months we would expect more evidence of weak capital inflows into the US.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Friday Humor: "Pastafarianism" And The Church Of The Flying Spaghetti Monster





In what some would call a victory for free speech, Lukas Novy, a follower of the Church of the Flying Spaghetti Monster, has been granted permission to wear a sieve on his head in his official ID card. As Prague Daily reports, Novy explains that the plastic kitchenware is a crucial part of his "Pastafarianism" faith. Officials, who initially denied his request, were swayed by his commitment to "His Noodliness," agreeing that this fits in with laws that allows Czech citizens to wear headgear for religious or medical reasons. Think that is 'humorous', look at a chart of TSLA... or listen to any recent 'Abe' speech...

 
Bruce Krasting's picture

Busted





If S&P had any guts it would lower the US another notch.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Bank Of England Helped Reichsbank Sell Its Nazi Gold





We previously showed hard evidence of the Bank of England's complicit hiding of the truth about the quality of Bundesbank gold stored in the Fed's vaults. A few weeks later in a "completely unrelated" action, the Bundesbank dramatically shifted its recent stance, and demanded that its gold be repatriated into its own vaults (and we now know the impact that has had on the paper-physical paper markets). However, in yet another one of the 'darkest episodes in central banking history' the FT reports, the Bank of England facilitated the sale of gold that was looted by the Nazis after their invasion of Czechoslovakia in 1938. Of course, judging today's central bankers by this ethical (and potentially criminal) behavior of over 70 years ago is unfair but it is notable that the pattern of whatever-it-takes and at-all-costs decisions, coupled with pervasive opacity and stark unaccountability, appear to have been formed a long time ago.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Key Events And Market Issues In The Coming Week





After a slow start in the week, there is a substantial pick up with announcements from the FOMC, ECB and BOE (as well as monetary policy updates from the RBI, RBA, Israel, and Czech Republic) with the possibility, if not probability, of a Fed update on tapering expectations. On Wednesday we get the much expected wholesale GDP revision which will boost "growth data" all the way back to 1929 and is expected to push current GDP as much as 3% higher, and on Friday is the "most important NFP payroll number" (at least since the last one, and before the next one), where the consensus expects a +183K print, and 7.5% unemployment. All this while earnings season comes to a close.

 
Marc To Market's picture

Deep Dive: Surplus Capital Revisited





Surplus capital used to be the understood as the primary challenge, but this fell out of favor.  This essay seeks to return it to the center of the narrative.  

 
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