• GoldCore
    04/23/2014 - 05:14
    Bloomberg Television’s “On The Move Asia” had a fascinating interview with Albert Cheng, the World Gold Council’s Managing Director, Far East. He discussed China’s gold market and what’s driving the...
  • Pivotfarm
    04/22/2014 - 20:14
    Age-old myths and fantasies about turning stuff that was worthless into gold. Alchemists leaning over their cauldrons of bubbling brew in the dark recesses of the dungeon of some mythical castle...

Czech

Tyler Durden's picture

Frontrunning: July 10





  • EU talks up Spanish banks package, markets skeptical (Reuters)
  • China’s Import Growth Misses Estimates For June (Bloomberg)
  • The monkeyhammering continues: Paulson Disadvantage Minus Fund down 7.9% in June, down 16% in 2012 (Bloomberg)
  • Draghi pledges further action if needed (FT)
  • JPMorgan Silence on Risk Model Spurs Calls for Disclosure (Bloomberg)
  • Norway's Statoil to restart production after govt stops strike (Reuters)
  • Top Fed officials set table for more easing (Reuters)
  • Euro-Split Case Drives Danish Krone Appeal in Binary Bet (Bloomberg)
  • Obama Intensifies Tax Fight (WSJ)
  • Europe Automakers Brace for No Recovery From Crisis (Bloomberg)
  • Boeing’s Air-Show Revival Leaves Airbus Nursing Neo Hangover (Bloomberg)
  • Libor Woes Threaten to Turn Companies Off Syndicated Loans (Bloomberg)
 


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Key Events In The Coming Week





A preview of the key events in the coming week (which will see more Central Banks jumping on the loose bandwagon and ease, because well, that is the only ammo the academic econ Ph.D's who run the world have left) courtesy of Goldman Sachs whose Jan Hatzius is once again calling for GDP targetting, as he did back in 2011, just so Bill Dudley can at least let him have his $750 million MBS LSAP. But more on that tomorrow.

 


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Guest Post: How Much To Save The Euro?





Germany keeps being told that it must pay up to save the euro. But how much can Germany pay? No-one seems to have thought about that, but there is already concern about the possible size of bill – German bond yields rose soon after news of the Spanish bail out, even before it was announced where the money was going to come from. (And it was of course a bail out for Spain, regardless of what Spain’s prime minister says. If I borrow money and then lend it to someone else I’ve still borrowed it.) There is though a more basic question. How much does it make sense for Germany to pay? What sort of bill would it be reasonable to present to them? In fact the best approximation one can arrive at is a bill of zero. Why zero? What about all these exports that have been produced because Germany has a currency whose value is determined not just by Germany but also by less productive, higher cost, economies?  That link has artificially depressed the prices of German exports. These net exports resulting from Germany’s Eurozone membership are actually the problem.

 


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What Is Next For Greece?





One European think tank which has been spot on in its skepticism over the past two years, is OpenEurope. Below they share their views on the next steps for Greece.

 


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The Good, Bad, And Ugly Of Emerging Markets





With Europe now seemingly in exile from even the bravest knife-catcher value-manager, and, despite media protestation, US equities facing weak macro data and a fiscal cliff of epic proportions; it is no surprise that everyone and their mom thinks emerging markets are the place to be. However, as UBS notes today, not all EM balance sheets (whether government, corporate, or private) are the same and they break down the low, medium, and high risk balance sheets across Asia, LatAm, and EMEA. As is evident in Europe, high debt levels are detrimental to economic growth and equity returns. Solid government accounts generally reward policymakers in such markets with valuable policy flexibility, while healthy consumer balance sheets allow credit growth to be a strong domestic growth driver. In a slow and uncertain global growth environment, pillars to support growth are crucial and are market differentiators - especially if global contagion spreads as we suspect

 


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Why Stability Stalwart Singapore Should Be Seriously Scared If The Feta Is Truly Accompli





We have discussed the probability (around 50%) and possibility of a Greek exit from the Euro ad nauseum; how the post-election anti-austerity rage is bringing the world to a new realization that this is probable not possible and the widespread risk aversion of this event is much more of a global event than local - no matter how many times you are told how small Greece is. Critically, as BofAML notes, it is the systemic threat of an untamed banking and sovereign crisis in Europe which makes multiple-sigma events less 'tail' and more 'normal'. With money due to run out at the latest by July, new elections mid-June (that show massive support for the anti-bailout party), and the impacts on the real economy, exchange rate and inflation fears, and default and ECB balance sheet implications; it seems there are also strong incentives to keep Greece in. However, there is a political line of compromise and austerity that will be hard to cross for both parties which, if it failed - and it doesn't have much time - would mean a very fast 'ring-fencing' would need to occur for this not to thermonuclear with the three main channels of volatility transmission to the rest of the world being: banking and finance, trade, and confidence - all three of which are active already with Asian trade (and banking exposure) seemingly under-appreciated in our view with Singapore dramatically exposed with a stunning 60%-plus of GDP tied up in European bank claims.

 


Tyler Durden's picture

Frontrunning: May 17





  • As ZH warned last week, JPMorgan’s Trading Loss Is Said to Rise at Least 50% (NYT)
  • Spanish recession bites, may be prolonged (Reuters)
  • Obama Lunch With Boehner Ends With Standoff Over Budget (Bloomberg)
  • Hilsenrath: Fed Minutes Reflect Wariness About Recovery's Strength (WSJ)
  • N. Korea Ship Seizes Chinese Boats for Ransom, Global Times Says (Bloomberg)
  • Greece Plans for June 17 Vote Under Caretake Government (Bloomberg)
  • Hollande turns to experience to fill French posts (FT)
  • ECB Stops Loans to Some Greek Banks as Draghi Talks Exit (Bloomberg)
  • Spain Urges EU to Provide More Support (WSJ)
  • North Korea resumes work on nuclear reactor: report (Reuters)
  • Fed’s Bullard Says Labor Policy Is Key to Cut Joblessness (Bloomberg)
  • China Expands Scope for Short Selling, Securities Journal Says (Bloomberg)
 


Tyler Durden's picture

Frontrunning: May 16





  • Facebook's selling shareholders can't wait to get out of company, increase offering by 25% (Bloomberg)
  • Boehner Draws Line in Sand on Debt (WSJ)
  • Romney Attacks Obama Over Recovery Citing U.S. Debt Load (Bloomberg)
  • BHP chairman says commodity markets to cool further (Reuters)
  • Merkel’s First Hollande Meeting Yields Growth Signal for Greece (Bloomberg)
  • Greek President Told Banks Anxious as Deposits Pulled (Bloomberg)
  • EU to push for binding investor pay votes (FT)
  • Martin Wolf: Era of a diminished superpower (FT)
  • China’s Hong Kong Home-Buying Influx Wanes, Midland Says (Bloomberg)
  • U.N. and Iran agree to keep talking on nuclear  (Reuters)
  • US nears deal to reopen Afghan supply route (FT)
 


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