David Faber

A $300 Billion Media Giant: Verizon Said To Be Exploring Charter Combination

While the fate of the Time Warner-ATT merger still remains up in the air, moments ago the WSJ reported that in what could be the next mega telecom-cable merger, $200 billion Verizon is exploring a combination with cable company Charter Communications, whose market cap clocks in at over $100 billion as of this morning.

Twitter Surges On Faber Report It Is "Moving Closer To A Sale"

Anyone who listened to Mark Maheney's downgrade of TWTR - noted earlier - and either sold or shorted the company overnight, is having an especially unpleasant day, because moments ago CNBC's David Faber reported that the company is moving closer to a sale.

"2016 Will Be No Fun" - Doug Kass Unveils 15 Surprises For The Year Ahead

My overriding theme and the central drama for the coming year is that unexpected events can take on greater importance as the Federal Reserve ends its near-decade-long Zero Interest Rate Policy. Consensus premises and forecasts will likely fall flat, in a rather spectacular manner. The low-conviction and directionless market that we saw in 2015 could become a no-conviction and very-much-directed market (i.e. one that's directed lower) in 2016. There will be no peace on earth in 2016, and our markets could lose a cushion of protection as valuations contract. (Just as "malinvestment" represented a key theme this year, we expect a compression of price-to-earnings ratios to serve as a big market driver in 2016.) In other words, we don't think 2016 will be fun.

Knight 2.0: Jefferies Rescues FXCM With $300 Million Bailout, CNBC Reports

In an apparent replay for 2012's Knight Trading algo-implosion $400 million cash-infusion bailout, Jefferies (owned by NY-based I-bank Leucadia) is riding its white horse to the rescue of FXCM and its $200-million-plus client losses:

  • *LUK IN $300M DEAL TO LET FXCM CONTINUE NORMAL OPS: CNBC
  • *LEUCADIA GIVE FXCM $300M IN FINANCING CNBC

Leucadia will get $250m in senior notes as part of the deal, CNBC says. So - in summary - a central bank blew up an FX broker and a mid-market junk-bond underwriter bailed them out... must be good for a green close for the week in stocks!

Knight To See Another Day Following 60%+ Convertible Dilution

According to CNBC's David Faber, Knight Capital will live at least for another day and avoid bankruptcy. Instead, it will experience dilution which will make its equityholders almost wish the company was filing. Knight, via Jefferies, is about to stick its shareholders with a massive dilution following the issuance of a $400 million convert bond at a $1.50 conversion price, or more than 60% dilution from Friday's $4.05 closing price. This means the pro forma share count will soar from 90 million to 350 million upon conversion, which as David Faber says, will take place promptly by all members of the syndicate after 10 business days. In other words, KCG just issued stock at a ~63% discount to new money.

Presenting Kyle Bass' Analysis On Shortening Collateral Chains; Or The Gradual Evisceration Of Shadow Banking

Kyle Bass presented us with a preview of what to expect in his monthly letter in a David Faber interview yesterday; today he delivers the full monty with his extended analysis of "shortening collateral chains" in his latest investor letter - a topic that we have been discussing broadly ever since we starting focusing on Shadow Banking two years ago (and why, as we have been pounding the table, it is the central bankers' primary prerogative to offset the collapse in the shadow banking system more than anything), and narrowly, since the realization of how tenuous the rehypothecation system is. The below analysis leads Bass to come to the one logical conclusion: "As European leaders press forward with failed attempt after failed attempt to suppress borrowing costs, control spending, reduce deficits and prop up what the markets have already told us is a broken monetary system, the data tells us that the citizens of the most troubled and profligate nations are losing confidence in the Euro dream. Trust has been lost, confidence in the system is being lost, and the ultimate consequence of this break down - sovereign defaults —are imminent. We continue to move ever closer to a great restructuring of sovereign debt."

Kyle Bass On Rehypothecation And Other Keynesian Endgame Scenarios

If readers have the sense there has been a deluge of Kyle Bass reading (and viewing) materials on Zero Hedge in the past two weeks, it is because there has been: and why not - after all, unlike all other cheap talking heads, and know-nothing pundits who merely need a suit to make an appearance on one of the TV's financial comedy channels, Kyle has been consistent in the most important thing - telling the truth. Today, he took his resurgent popularity to CNBC which always knows which way the winds blow, and told David Faber more or less everything that Zero Hedge readers know already about Europe's collapse, on why the ECB will print but only after a default, and about the inevitable global debt restructuring. There was a twist: as most regulars here know, the key topic of the past week, of December, and potentially of 2011, is the limitless "fractional Prime Broker lending" of assets-cum-liabilities (and when it comes to the realization that one's gold itself may be rehypothecated, via GLD, it is no surprise why paper gold is plunging, with the expected delayed effect of slow comprehension) in an infinite loop of daisy chained counterparty exposure, also known as rehypothecation. Which is precisely what what Bass touches on 9 minutes 30 seconds into the interview when the discussion shifts to "shortening collateral chains." Must watch for everyone who enjoys not being lied to.