Default Rate

About That $1 Trillion In Distressed Credit: UBS Responds To Wall Street's Shock

UBS' recent bearish assessment of the junk bond space led to a firestorm of protests from Wall Street asset managers for whom just the selloff in itself had become a catalyst to buy. So, to clear up any confusion, here is Matthew Mish responding to the barrage of angry bulls why the $1 trillion in distressed credit - a third of the entire universe - is not just an energy story, and responding to the five most important and recurring questions

Bank of America: "Corporate Balance Sheets Are The Most Unhealthy They Have Ever Been"

"...in a world where corporate balance sheets are arguably the most unhealthy they have ever been (all-time high leverage in HG and HY) where companies have relied on cheap debt to fund a growth through acquisition strategy, what happens if funding is either unavailable or too expensive to make a growth through acquisition strategy make sense? Same goes for buybacks and special dividends?"

According To These 2 Charts, A Default Cycle In The US Is Now Inevitable

"Over the past 100 years, when defaults have risen above 4%, they have typically continued to rise close to 10% (i.e. a full default cycle). This is because of the tendency for credit stress to become self-fuelling: a rise in expected defaults pushes up financing costs, which tips some marginal borrowers over the edge, further increasing defaults and so on.

What Keeps Bank Of America's Junk Bond Analyst Up At Night

"What keeps us up at night, however, is a situation where history is little indicator of what’s to come. Although there is no doubt that we do not need to have a recession in 2016 to experience further high yield weakness, we are concerned that this cycle could prove to be not only different, but more severe than past cycles. Should a slowdown today be swifter and deeper, more akin to 2008 than 2002, we are concerned about the ability of the central bank to create enough monetary stimulus to stem a crisis."

10 Key Energy Trends To Watch For In 2016

Energy investors got clobbered in 2015, and are hoping for things to turn positive as we head into the New Year. What can we expect in 2016? Here is a rundown of some key trends to watch for...

Time For Torches & Pitchforks: The Little Guy Is About To Get Monkey-Hammered Again

The prospect that the leaders of our monetary politburo are about to be tarred and feathered by economic reality might be satisfying enough if it led to the repudiation of Keynesian central planning and a thorough housecleaning at the Fed. Unfortunately, it will also mean that tens of millions of retail investors and 401k holders will be taken to the slaughterhouse for the third time this century. And this time the Fed is out of dry powder, meaning retail investors will never recover as they did after 2002 and 2009.

The Great Disconnect Is Palpable

Taken together with the rather steep drop in US industrial production, the risks of a full-blown and perhaps severe recession have undoubtedly grown. Unlike what the FOMC is trying to project via the federal funds rate, a rate that isn’t being fully complemented, either, at this point, visible economic risk is not just rising it is exploding.