Deutsche Bank

Tyler Durden's picture

Frontrunning: May 20





  • Obama's Counsel Was Told of IRS Audit Findings Weeks Ago (WSJ)
  • North Korea fires sixth missile in three days (Reuters)
  • Enron No Lesson to Traders as EU Probes Oil-Price Manipulation (BBG)
  • Don't cry for me, Eurozone: Thinking the Unthinkable - Quitting a Currency (WSJ)
  • H-1B Models Strut Into U.S. as Programmers Pray for Help (BBG)
  • Gold Bear Bets Reach Record as Soros Cuts Holdings (BBG)
  • Yahoo has agreed to pay $1.1 billion for Tumblr (WSJ)
  • JPMorgan Holders Led by Chairmen-CEOs to Vote on Dimon (BBG)
  • Apple faces grilling over US tax rate (FT)
  • Nissan to Sell First Joint Minicar to Expand in Japan Market (BBG)
  • Fierce battle for corporate loans sparks US bank risk concerns (FT)
  • Microsoft Updates Xbox as Apple to Facebook Gain in Games (BBG)
 
Tyler Durden's picture

Frontrunning: May 17





  • Mine union threatens to bring South Africa to 'standstill' (Reuters)
  • Russia Raises Stakes in Syria (WSJ) - as reported here yesterday 
  • Japan buys into US shale gas boom (FT)
  • Bill Gates Retakes World’s Richest Title From Carlos Slim (BBG) - so he can afford a Tesla now?
  • China Wages Rose Sharply in 2012 (WSJ)
  • Regulators Target Exchanges As They Ready Record Fine (WSJ)
  • Citi Takes Some Traders Off Bloomberg Chat Tool (WSJ)
  • After Google, Amazon to be grilled on UK tax presence (Reuters)
  • Apple CEO Cook to Propose Tax Reform for Offshore Cash (BBG)
  • French, German politicians to pressure Google on tax (Reuters)
  • Gold Bears Revived as Rout Resumes After Coin Rush (BBG)
  • A stretched Samsung chases rival Apple's suppliers (Reuters)
 
Tyler Durden's picture

Frontrunning: May 16





  • As scandals mount, White House springs into damage control (Reuters)
  • Glencore Xstrata chairman ousted in surprise coup (Reuters), former BP CEO Tony Hayward appointed as interim chairman (WSJ)
  • JPMorgan Chase asks Bloomberg for data records (Telegraph)
  • Platts Retains Energy Trader Confidence Amid Price-Fix Probe (BBG)
  • Syrian Internet service comes back online (PCWorld)
  • Japan Q1 growth hits 3.5% on Abe impact although fall in business investment clouds optimism for recovery (FT)
  • Soros Joins Gold-Stake Cuts Before Bear Market Drop (BBG)
  • Factory Ceiling Collapses in Cambodia (WSJ)
  • Sony’s $100 Billion Lost Decade Supports Loeb Breakup (BBG)
  • Snags await favourite for Federal Reserve job (FT)
  • James Bond’s Pinewood Turned Down on $300 Million Plan (BBG)
 
Tyler Durden's picture

Frontrunning: May 14





  • Controversies give Obama new governing headaches (Reuters)
  • About that Capex... BHP to Rein In Investment, Chief Says (WSJ), considers returning cash to shareholders (FT)
  • Bloomberg users’ messages leaked online (FT)
  • Japanese mayor sparks China outrage with sex-slave remarks (Reuters)
  • Economists Cut China Forecasts (WSJ)
  • U.S. oil boom leaves OPEC sidelined from demand growth (Reuters)
  • U.S. banks push back on change in loan loss accounting (Reuters)
  • Fed’s Plosser Says Slowing Inflation No Concern for Policy (BBG)
  • Watchdog probes 1m US swap contracts (FT)
  • Used Gold Supply Heads for ’08 Low as Sellers Balk (BBG)
  • Ex-BlackRock Manager Said to Be Arrested in U.K. Probe (BBG)
 
Tyler Durden's picture

Frontrunning: May 13





  • Hilsenrath: A Top Contender at the Fed Faces Test Over Easy Money (WSJ)
  • Yen drops further as G7 avoids criticizing Japan (Reuters)
  • Markets missed Flaherty’s clues on next Bank of Canada chief (G&M)
  • Republicans turn screws over Tea Party tax probes (FT)
  • Dual-track Libor replacement lined up (FT)
  • Risks to China recovery seen as factory output underwhelms (Reuters)
  • Barack Obama’s goal of universal healthcare could be set back significantly by Texas Governor Rick Perry (FT)
  • Gold Bears Pull $20.8 Billion as BlackRock Says Buy (BBG)
  • Mexico sets shelters as volcano shakes, spews ash (AP)
  • Europe Eases Corporate Tax Dodge as Worker Burdens Rise (BBG)
  • IPOs Set to Raise Most Cash Since Crisis (WSJ)
  • Melting Ice Opens Fight Over Sea Routes for Arctic Debate (BBG)
  • Top hedge funds bet on Greek banks (FT)
  • Icahn Asks Investors to Make Big Bet on a Debt-Laden Dell (BBG)
 
GoldCore's picture

Abenomics Brings Currency Wars to G7 Talks





As the global economic slump continues central bankers, such as Mario Draghi, and politicians have vowed “to do whatever it takes” to get economies back on track. Such policies while having near term benefits are considered extremely risky in the longer run by many commentators as they could beckon runaway inflation or stagflation, with ruinous results.

Shinzo Abe unleashed his plan with the blessing of the Bank of Japan to begin aggressive government bond purchases. This has led to a massive growth of 60% on the Nikkei and is deflating the yen and boosting their exports.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Frontrunning: May 10





  • PBOC Says China Shouldn’t Be ’Blindly Optimistic’ on Inflation (BBG)
  • Foreigners Buying Half of London New Homes Prop Up Building (BBG) - first they come for the foreign deposits, then for the real assets...
  • Investors Rediscovering Margin Debt (WSJ) - well, yes: it is at record highs
  • China issues new rules targeting wealth management fund pools (RTRS)
  • Navy $37 Billion Ships Seen Unsuitable Have 2-Year Window (BBG)
  • New York may have to drop claims against BofA over Merrill (RTRS)
  • FBI Rejects Boston Police Stance in Spat Over Terror Data (BBG)
  • In eastern Syria oil smugglers benefit from chaos (RTRS)
 
Tyler Durden's picture

Overnight Yen Tumble Sends Asia Scrambling To Retaliate





The main story overnight is without doubt the dramatic plunge in the Yen, which following the breach and trigger of USDJPY 100 stops has been a straight diagonal line to the upper right (or lower for the Yen across all currency crosses) and at last check was approaching 101.50, in turn sending the USD higher in virtually all jurisdictions. However it is not so much the Yen weakness that was surprising - a nation hell bent on doubling its monetary base in two years will do that - but the accelerating response in neighboring countries all of which are seeing Japan as the biggest economic threat suddenly and all are scrambling to respond. Sure enough, midway through the evening session, Sri Lanka cut its reverse repo and repurchase rate to 9% and 7% respectively, promptly followed by Vietnam cutting its own refinancing rate from 8% to 7%, then moving to Thailand where the finance chief Kittiratt called for a rate cut exceeding 25 bps, and more jawboning from South Korea suggesting even more rate cuts from the export-driven country are set to come as it loses trade competitiveness to Japan. Asian financial crisis 2.0 any minute now?

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Deutsche Bank: "We Fully Understand Why The Authorities Wouldn't Want Free Markets To Operate Today"





"Is it healthy that the default/insolvency cycle is being sedated in so many large economies? Surely the financial system and life in general has prospered through history on the basis of creative destruction. Indeed all the good looking and intelligent readers of this note are products of survival of the fittest. Economic growth over time is helped by a regular cleansing. So are low defaults helping to lock in low growth for years to come across many large economies? Clearly there are other factors at work here but we think that what's great for credit investors isn't necessarily good for the global economy. A bit of a paradox. We would stress that we fully understand why the authorities wouldn't want free markets to operate today as the risk of a huge global default and unemployment cycle would still be very high. However their intervention has a cost in our opinion."

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Frontrunning: May 9





  • Einhorn's advice to investors: don't take my advice (Reuters)
  • Next: floating dead vegetables: Chinese inflation rises on soaring vegetable prices (FT)
  • The scramble for the bottom dollar is on: McDonald's, Wendy's Battle for Value-Centric Customers (WSJ)
  • Cheaper iPhone coming after all: Apple supplier Pegatron boosts China workforce by 40 percent in second quarter (Reuters)
  • House set to pass tactical Republican debt bill (Reuters)
  • Underwriting bonanza: Goldman Said to Earn $500 Million Arranging Malaysia Bond (BBG)
  • G7 finance chiefs to discuss bank reform push (Reuters)
  • Big Banks Push Back Against Tighter Rules (WSJ)
  • University endowments trim holdings in US Treasuries (FT)
  • Ex-Pakistan PM's son abducted as Taliban threaten poll (Reuters)
  • China Dowry Filled With Gold Signals Gains for Jewelers (BBG)
  • As discussed here over a year ago: China inflation data shows central bank policy dilemma (Reuters)
 
Tyler Durden's picture

Overnight Sentiment: Buy In May, And Continue Buying In May As Global Easing Accelerates





With another listless macro day in the offing, the main event was the previously mentioned Bank of Korea 25 bps rate cut, which coming at a time when everyone else in the world is easing was not too surprising, but was somewhat unexpected in light of persistent inflationary pressures. Either way, the gauntlet at Abenomics has been thrown and any temporary Japanese Yen-driven export gains will likely not persist as it is the quality of products perception (sorry 20th century Toshiba and Sony), that is the primary determinant of end demand, not transitory, FX-driven prices. And now that Korea is set on once again matching Japan in competitiveness, the final piece of the Abenomics unwind puzzle has finally clicked into place.  Elsewhere overnight, China reported consumer price inflation increasing by 2.4%, on expectations of a 2.3% rise, driven by a 4% jump in food costs: hardly the thing of Politburo dreams. Or perhaps the PBOC can just print more pigs, soy and birdflu-free chickens? On the other hand, PPI dropped 2.6% in April, on estimates of a 2.3% decline, as China telegraphs it has the capacity, if needed, to stimulate the economy. This is ironic considering its inflation pressures are externally-driven, and come from the Fed and the BOJ, and soon the BOE and ECB. And thus its economy stagnates while prices are driven higher by hot money flows. What to do?

 
Tyler Durden's picture

11 Reasons Why The Federal Reserve Should Be Abolished





If the American people truly understood how the Federal Reserve system works and what it has done to us, they would be screaming for it to be abolished immediately.  It is a system that was designed by international bankers for the benefit of international bankers, and it is systematically impoverishing the American people. The Federal Reserve system is the primary reason why our currency has declined in value by well over 95 percent and our national debt has gotten more than 5000 times larger over the past 100 years. The Fed creates our "booms" and our "busts", and they have done an absolutely miserable job of managing our economy. So why is the Federal Reserve doing it?  Sadly, this is the way it works all over the globe today.  In fact, all 187 nations that belong to the IMF have a central bank.  But the truth is that there are much better alternatives.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Frontrunning: May 7





  • Microsoft prepares U-turn on Windows 8 (FT), Microsoft admits failure on Windows 8 (MW), After Bumpy Start, Microsoft Rethinks Windows 8 (NYT)
  • China reports four more bird flu deaths, toll rises to 31 (Reuters)
  • Republicans shift stance on US budget (FT)
  • NYC Tallest Condo Corridor Gets New Entrant With Steinway (BBG)
  • U.S. Says China's Government, Military Used Cyberespionage (WSJ)
  • China rejects Pentagon charges of military espionage (Reuters)
  • Bank of China Cuts Off North Korean Bank (WSJ)
  • Libya defense minister quits over siege of ministries by gunmen (Reuters)
  • London Recruiter Says City Job Vacancies Rose 19% (BBG)
  • Colleges Cut Prices by Providing More Financial Aid (WSJ)  or, said otherwise, loans
  • Jeweler agrees to plead guilty in KPMG insider-trading case (LA Times)
 
Tyler Durden's picture

Frontrunning: May 6





  • Lesson From Buffett: Doubt Yourself (WSJ)
  • Gold Bulls Split With Buffett as Traders Say Sell (BBG)
  • Apple Misses IPhone Customers as Global Carriers Balk (BBG)
  • Russia extends Cypriot loan by 2 years, cuts interest: troika document (Reuters)
  • Tax Rewrite in Play in Capitol (WSJ)
  • No early warning for U.S. on Israeli strikes in Syria (Reuters)
  • Germany riveted at start of neo-Nazi murder trial (Reuters)
  • JPMorgan Investors Urged to Split Chairman Role, Oust Directors (BBG)
  • Leniency for Offshore Cheats (WSJ)
  • Brussels steps up efforts over tax avoidance (FT)
  • Ambulance chasing: Mesothelioma Doctors, Lawyers Join Hunt for Valuable Asbestos Cases (WSJ)
  • Web Sales-Tax Bill Set to Face Bumps (WSJ)
  • Colleges Cut Prices by Providing More Financial Aid (WSJ)
 
Tyler Durden's picture

Full NFP Preview





  • Bank of America 125K
  • UBS 130K
  • Deutsche Bank 140K
  • Citigroup 140K
  • JP Morgan 145K
  • Goldman Sachs 150K
  • Barclays 150K
  • HSBC 170K
 
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