Deutsche Bank

Activist Hedge Fund Starboard, Expert On Salt Content Of Pasta Water, Now Wants To Overthrow Yahoo's Board

A year and a half after Starboard proposed that the only thing Oliver Garden needs to attract new clients is to change the salt content of its pasta water, the activist fund has just unleashed a campaign seeking to overthrow the entire board of Yahoo, because the fund which clearly was a nutritional expert in late 2014, now thinks that its 1.7% in YHOO stock hodlings entitle it to the intimate knowledge of just how to "fix" Yahoo. Perhaps, the thinking goes, all it takes for people to start using Yahoo again is a new board?

U.S. Futures Slide, Crude Under $39 As Dollar Rallies For Fifth Day

Following yesterday's dollar spike which, which topped the longest rally in the greenback in one month, the prevailing trade overnight has been more of the same, and in the last session of this holiday shortened week we have seen the USD rise for the fifth consecutive day on concerns the suddenly hawkish Fed (at least as long as the S&P is above 2000) may hike sooner than expected, which in turn has pressured WTI below $39 earlier in the session, and leading to weakness across virtually all global risk assets.

Goldman Says To Sell Risk Assets, Go To Cash Ahead Of "Expected Elevated Volatility"

The latest to join in the skepticism rally is none other than Goldman Sachs strategist Christian Mueller-Glissmann who in the latest "Global Opportunity Asset Locator" report, writes that the "relief rally across risky assets might fade over the near term", warns that "sharp declines in oil prices are likely to weigh on risky assets again", suggests to go to "reduce risk allocation", warns against holding US HY bonds as "the risk/reward is least favourable if oil prices reverse course" and "go to cash" ahead of "expected elevated volatility."

Global Markets, S&P500 Futures Fall After Brussels Bombings

This morning's Brussels suicide attacks have led to risk-off sentiment across European asset classes, with Bunds higher and equities firmly in the red, although if the Paris terrorist attacks of November are any indication, today's tragic events may be just the catalyst the S&P500 needs to surge back to all time highs. FX markets have also been dominated by events in Brussels, with USD and JPY strengthening, while EUR and GBP softening throughout the European morning.

It's Not Over Yet - Moody's Put Deutsche Bank On Review For Downgrades

In a worryingly coincidentally timed move, Moody's has put Desutche Bank on review for downgrade, citing "execution challenges" in its new strategic plan. The worrying aspect comes from the fact the timing is entirely fitting with the ratings downgrade that started the last and most painful down-leg in Lehman's collapse...

Buyback Blackout Period Starts Monday: Is This The Catalyst That Ends The S&P Rally?

"Buyback blackout period starts Monday. An increasing number of S&P 500 companies will enter into their blackout period starting next week, about a month before the earnings season kicks into high gear in the third week of April."  This is taking place as institutional clients have been aggressively dumping stocks for the past seven weeks, while corporations have been soaking up all this liquidating activity. Should the selling continue for yet another week, who will soak up the selling this time?

This Is How Venezuela Exported 12.5 Tonnes Of Gold To Switzerland On March 8, 2016 Via Paris

Approximately 50 tonnes of BCV gold has been exported from Venezuela to Switzerland within the first 10 weeks of 2016. How much longer can this outflow continue? This gold is being exported by the BCV in order to participate in swaps (or maybe even outright sales) in order to provide external financing to the Venezuelan Government. The fact that the gold is being picked up by Brinks Switzerland suggests it is being brought to a Swiss gold refinery. The main reason gold is sent to Switzerland is so that it can be refined or recast.

How To Trade The Stock Market According To Jim Cramer

"We're in a bear market — we can't get away from it," warned CNBC's Jim Cramer on February 5th, exclaiming that "the stock market is not working." A month later - following a 13%, almost irrepressible ramp in stocks - Cramer has changed his tune, explaining last night that "signs of a massive rally could be coming." We wonder, with contrarianism like this (combined with his confidence that "Deutsche Bank is not systemic"), is Cramer the new Gartman?

Frontrunning: March 18

  • Dow's Freakish Bounce Makes Investors Whole, Can't Erase Doubts (BBG)
  • R.I.P. Dollar Rally as Dovish Fed Spurs Worst Slump Since 2011 (BBG)
  • Global Currencies Soar, Defying Central Bankers (WSJ)
  • Oil hits 2016 high above $42 on production and demand outlook (Reuters)
  • The U.S. Is Exporting Its Oil Everywhere (BBG)
  • Hillary Clinton’s Allies Launch Plan to Undercut Donald Trump Now (WSJ)

"Fear" Indicator Surges To Record High

When it comes to the "here and now", which in the Fed's centrally-planned market is driven almost excusively by momentum ignition algos, complacency indeed rules (VIX 13). But even the merest glimpse into the near future, or rather how the present environment may disconnect with what may happen tomorrow, or next week, or, as the case may be, in three months, institutional investors are more concerned than ever before. But is this a confirmation that the US stock market is about to have a new "Deutsche Bank" moment?

World’s Second Largest Reinsurer Buys Gold, Hoards Cash To Counter Negative Interest Rates

German reinsurer Munich Re is boosting its gold and cash reserves in the face of the punishing negative interest rates from the European Central Bank, it said on Wednesday. Munich Re has held gold in its coffers for some time and recently added a cash sum in in the two-digit million euros, Chief Executive Nikolaus von Bomhard told a news conference.  "We are just trying it out, but you can see how serious the situation is," von Bomhard said.

Former Fed Employee Avoids Jail, Gets $2,000 Fine For Stealing Fed Secrets On Behalf Of Goldman Sachs

Jason Gross was the latest former banker to make a mockery of the US judicial system when he was spared prison on Wednesday, for stealing NY Fed secrets on behalf of Goldman Sachs. Instead Gross, 37, was fined $2,000 by U.S. Magistrate Judge Gabriel Gorenstein in Manhattan and sentenced to a year of probation with 200 hours of community service after pleading guilty to a misdemeanor charge of theft of government property.