Deutsche Bank

Which Asset Class Will Be Most Impacted By A Rate Hike?

Going into Thursday, everyone - and we do mean everyone - is scrambling to predict which asset classes are most susceptible to a Fed hike. Amid the rampant confusion, BofAML asked fund managers to weigh in. Here are the results.

UniCredit To Fire 10,000 As EU Bank Pink Slip Pandemonium Continues

First it was Deutsche Bank, and now UniCredit. "Italy's biggest bank by assets, is planning to cut around 10,000 jobs, or 7 percent of its workforce, as it seeks to slash costs and boost profits, a source at the bank told Reuters on Monday," Reuters reports.

Is The Fed Making A Huge "Policy Mistake"? This Market Reaction Will Give The Answer

To be sure, whether or not Janet Yellen has made a mistake will become all too clear over time. All one need do is observe whether EMs careen further into chaos and/or whether the PBoC becomes even more schizophrenic, but as far as what to watch in the immediate aftermath of the FOMC announcement, we return to what we noted after September’s NFP print when we quoted BofAML. To wit: “If they do hike, watch the long-end.”

Why Risk Parity Funds Are Unprepared For A Rate HIke

"A 'policy error' rate hike might well result in positive correlations among equities, commodities and bonds, due to a combination of risk off and higher rates. In this case it is not entirely clear how risk-parity funds would rebalance: A potential candidate for inflows would be currencies, and in particular the dollar. This would only put additional upward pressure on the dollar, reinforcing the “policy error” nature of the hike."

Weekend Reading: Rooting For The Bull?

This past week has seen a continuation of market volatility unlike anything witnessed over the last several years. Of course, this volatility all coincides at a time where market participants are struggling with a global economic slowdown, pressures from China, collapsing oil prices, a lack of liquidity from the Federal Reserve and the threat of rising interest rates.  It is a brew of ingredients that would have already likely toppled previous bull markets, and it is only by a hairsbreadth the current one continues to breathe.

The Fed Is About To Unleash Deflation: Deutsche Bank Shows How

When it comes to the Fed's upcoming rate hike, only one simple shorthand matters: higher rates means less liquidity, and vice versa. What does that mean for inflation/deflation and bond yields? According to the following simple and understandable analysis by Deutsche Bank, nothing good.

Fed Hike Will Unleash "Panic And Turmoil" And A New Emerging Market Crisis, Warns World Bank Chief Economist

Earlier today we got the most glaring confirmation there had been absolutely zero coordination at the highest levels of authority and "responsibility", when the World Bank's current chief economist, Kaushik Basu warned that the Fed risks, and we quote, triggering “panic and turmoil” in emerging markets if it opts to raise rates at its September meeting and should hold fire until the global economy is on a surer footing, the World Bank’s chief economist has warned. And just in case casually tossing the words "panic in turmoil" was not enough, Basu decided to add a few more choice nouns, adding a rate hike "could yield a “shock” and a new crisis in emerging markets"

Developed Market Stocks & Bonds Have Never (Ever) Been This Expensive

Thanks to the new normal world of extremely loose monetary policy and extraordinary accumulations of financial assets by Central Banks, Deutsche Bank finds that we live in a period not of selectively expensive global asset prices, but of record "expensiveness" across developed market bonds, stocks, and real estate.