Deutsche Bank

Frontrunning: October 19

  • Great News: China’s GDP Growth Beats Forecasts as Stimulus Supports Spending (BBG)
  • Oh wait, maybe not: China GDP: Deflategate Comes to Beijing (WSJ)
  • Actually, definitely not: Shanghai rebar falls to record low after weak China GDP (Reuters)
  • But who cares: European Shares Gain on Earnings as Bonds Drop, Metals Decline (BBG)

Futures Flat As Algos Can't Decide If Chinese "Good" Data Is Bad For Stocks, Or Just Meaningless

The key overnight event was the much anticipated, goalseeked and completely fabricated Chinese economic data dump, which was both good and bad depending on who was asked: bad, in that at 6.9% it was below the government's 7.0% target and the lowest since Q1 2009, and thus hinting at "more stimulus" especially since industrial production (5.7%, Exp. 6.0%) and fixed spending also both missed; it was good because it beat expectations of 6.8% by the smallest possible increment, and set the tone for much of Europe's trading session, even if Asia shares ultimately closed largely in the red over skepticism over the authenticity of the GDP results. Worse, and confirming the global economy is now one massive circular reference, China accused the Fed's rate hike plans for slowing down its economy, which is ironic because the Fed accused China's economy for forcing it to delay its rate hike.

Scandal-Plagued Deutsche Bank Terminates Head Of I-Banking As Part Of Sweeping Restructuring

Moments ago, Europe's largest bank by assets and by gross notional derivatives, announced a raft of high-level management changes as part of an anticipated and sweeping restructuring of key divisions and senior-level committees. As WSJ reports, Colin Fan, the investment-banking co-head responsible for securities trading, will resign effective Monday. But the most profound change is that Deutsche Bank will split its investment bank into two pieces: one, focused on mergers and other deals, corporate finance and transaction banking services such as cash management, and the other on trading and global markets.

BlackRock Warns Of "Land Mines" As Benefits Of Lower Yields For Corporate Issuers Fades

As we have warned numerous times - and any trader old enough to have actually lived through a credit cycle can attest to - there is only so much releveraging shareholder-friendly exuberance firms can do before the company's balance sheet becomes questionable. That inflection point has come for US equities. The deterioration of balance-sheet health is "increasingly alarming" and will only worsen if earnings growth continues to stall amid a global economic slowdown, according to Goldman Sachs and JPMorgan's Eric Beinstein warns "the benefit of lower yields for corporate issuers is fading." The weakness is widespread as BlackRock fears "you’ll continue to see some land mines out there."

Schlumberger: This Is "The Most Severe Downturn For Decades", "The Recovery Now Appears To Be Delayed"

"The business environment deteriorated further in the third quarter. However, the cost reduction actions we took in previous quarters and the acceleration of our transformation program enabled us to protect our financial performance in what is shaping up to be the most severe downturn in the industry for decades.... In light of conservative customer budgets for next year, we are therefore entering another period during which we will continually adjust resources in line with activity, as the recovery now appears to be delayed."

Have We Reached "Peak Fedspeak"?

Between a convoluted, self-referential reaction function and a cacophony of Fed speakers, the market simply can no longer process the FOMC's message and with that in mind, we bring you RBS’ Alberto Gallo who asks if perhaps we have reached “peak Fedspeak”.

Deflation = Debt + Demographics + Disruption

The cyclical fallout from the Great Financial Crisis and the secular deflationary “D’s” of excess Debt, tech Disruption, aging Demographics have been the major catalysts for deflation.