• Tim Knight from...
    12/21/2014 - 09:37
    The five remaining equity bears on Earth are all saying the same thing: "We'll get 'em in 2015." To which I ask: why? What's going to change?

Equity Markets

Tyler Durden's picture

2014 Year In Review (Part 2): Will 2015 Be The Year It All Comes Tumbling Down?





Despite the authorities' best efforts to keep everything orderly, we know how this global Game of Geopolitical Tetris ends: "Players lose a typical game of Tetris when they can no longer keep up with the increasing speed, and the Tetriminos stack up to the top of the playing field. This is commonly referred to as topping out."

"I’m tired of being outraged!"

 
Marc To Market's picture

Dollar Bulls Regain Upper Hand





When the dollar falls, we are told it is logical.  The empire is crashing and burning.  When the dollar rises, the markets, we are told are manipulated.    Well, the dollar is back, and the technical correction ended, near we told you it would.  

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Archaea Capital's 5 Bad Trades To Avoid Next Year





Blind faith in policymakers remains a bad trade that’s still widely held. Pressure builds everywhere we look. Not as a consequence of the Fed’s ineptitude (which is a constant in the equation, not a variable), but through the blind faith markets continuing to place bets on the very low probability outcome – that everything will turn out well this time around. And so the pressure keeps rising. Managers are under pressure to perform and missing more targets, levering up on hope. Without further delay we present our slightly unconventional annual list. Instead of the usual what you should do, we prefer the more helpful (for us at least) what we probably wouldn’t do. Five fresh new contenders for what could become some very bad trades in the coming year.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Yellen Decoupled Stocks From Oil, BofA Warns It Won't Last





As we have noted in the last two days, on the heels of Janet Yellen's mutterings, US equity markets have exploded higher even as the highly correlated and causative oil prices have done anything but rise. This 'fact' has not escaped BofA's Hans Mikkelsen's attention as he warns, "While stocks currently are getting a break from oil, it appears most likely that they reconnect when the decline in oil prices accelerates – especially if we see associated weakness in credit and EM." And sure enough, modestly at first, the two are starting to converge this morning...

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Futures Continue Rising As Illiquid Market Anticipates More Volatility In Today's Quad-Witching





Yesterday's epic market surge, the biggest Dow surge since December 2011 on the back of the most violent short squeeze in three years, highlighted just why being caught wrong side in an illiquid market can be terminal to one's asset management career (especially if on margin), and thus why hedge funds are so leery of dipping more than their toe in especially on the short side, resulting in a 6th consecutive year of underperformance relative to the confidence-boosting policy tool that is the S&P. And with today's session the last Friday before Christmas week, compounded by a quadruple witching option expiration, expect even less liquidity and even more violent moves as a few E-mini oddlots take out the entire stack on either the bid or ask side. Keep an eye on the USDJPY which, now that equities have decided to ignore both HY and energy prices, is the only driver for risk left: this means the usual pre-US open upward momentum ignition rigging will be rife to set a positive tone ahead of today's session.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Futures Soar On Swiss NIRP Stunner, "Considerably Patient" Fed





After drifting unchanged for much of the overnight session, US futures exploded higher shortly after the previously noted SNB's NIRP announcement, which took place at 2 am eastern, which made it explicit that yet another banks will herd the bouncing dead cats right into new all time stock market highs, and following the European open, were carried even higher as the global "risk-on" momentum ignition algos woke up, spiking all recently depressed assets higher, including energy as Brent rose almost 3% despite Saudi Arabia’s oil minister Ali al-Naimi once again saying "it is difficult if not impossible" for OPEC and his kingdom to reduce output.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

No More "Considerable Time" - Meet The New, "Patient" Fed





With expectations that the FOMC would drop "considerable time," ignore foreign market instability, and shrug off HY credit's demise (as they had previously said it was a bubble), the members did not let anyone down...

  • *FOMC SAYS IT CAN BE 'PATIENT' IN APPROACH TO RAISING RATES
  • *FOMC DECLINES TO MENTION RECENT GLOBAL MARKET INSTABILITY
  • *FOMC SAYS PATIENT APPROACH 'CONSISTENT WITH OCT. STATEMENT'
  • *FISHER, PLOSSER, KOCHERLAKOTA DISSENT IN FOMC DECISION

For the 3rd FOMC meeting in a row, equity markets have surged (and decoupled from bonds); we will soon see if history repeats a third time.

Pre-FOMC: S&P Futs: 1988.00, 10Y 2010%, Gold $1195, WTI $57.50

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Surprise... Everyone Was Wrong About The End Of QE





Since the beginning of this year, Wall Street economists and analysts have been consistently prognosticating that following the Federal Reserve's latest bond buying campaign, economic growth would gather steam and interest rates would begin to rise. This has consistently been the wrong call. The recent decline in interest rates should really not be a surprise as there is little evidence that current rates of economic growth are set to increase markedly anytime soon. Consumers are still heavily levered; wage growth remains anemic, and business owners are still operating on an "as needed basis." This "economic reality" continues to constrain the ability of the economy to grow organically at strong enough rates to sustain higher interest rates. This is a point that seems to be lost on most economists who forget that the Federal Reserve has been pumping in trillions of dollars of liquidity into the economy to pull forward future consumption.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Bob Janjuah: Forget Rate Hikes, "We May Well Need QE4 From The Fed"





I realise that it is not normal to have a bearish risk view for December through to mid-January. Normally markets tend to ramp up in December and early January before selling off later in January. But this year I do think things are different. One look at the moves in core bond markets over 2014, when almost everyone I talked to had been bearish bonds, paints a stunning picture. I would entitle this picture ‘The Victory of Deflation’, or (as many folks now talk about (but still generally dismiss)) ‘The Japanification of the World’. I may end up eating my words in 2015 if the US consumer does come through, but if he or she does not, then we may well need QE4 from the Fed to battle the incredibly strong headwinds of deflation around the world. And I will revert on this subject, but to me the coming ECB QE and more BOJ QE are woefully inadequate substitutes for USD Fed QE.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Crude Continues Slide, Ruble Stabilizes, US Futures Rebound As Global Stocks Slump: All Eyes On Yellen





Previewing today's market: near record low liquidity, with chance of ridiculous volatility in the Ruble, energy and equity markets. While no doubt today's main event will be the "considerable" FOMC announcement and the Fed's downward-revised economic projections followed by Yellen's press conference, what traders will be most excited by is that, finally, Jim Bullard will no longer be bound by the blackout period surround FOMC decisions, and as such can hint of QE4 again at his leisure during key market inflection (i.e., selling) points.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

"Now There's Something You Don't See Every Day"





Last weekend’s election in Japan was the opposite of exciting. The upcoming elections in Greece, however, are another matter entirely. What’s really different about the Greek elections now and the Greek elections in 2012 is the lack of a Oh-My-God-Look-At-Greece media Narrative today, particularly in the US. Here it’s all oil, all the time, which means that any power transition in Greece will come as a big negative “surprise” to US investors and US markets. What we can tell you with confidence is that the Common Knowledge of the market today is that Greece is “fixed”, which means that any un-fixing will hit markets like a ton of bricks. It’s an asymmetric risk/reward profile – in a bad way – for global markets in general and European markets in particular.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

It's Not Just Russia: Middle East In Freefall, Biggest Plunge In 6 Years





Dubai's Financial Market General Index is now down 40% since the peak in oil prices in June this year. For now, only Qatar is clinging to gains year-to-date as the rest of the Middle Eastern equity markets give up 30-60% gains from mid-year and tumble to negative. Dubai and Abu Dhabi alone are down over 8% since Friday. Saudi Arabia is down 7.3% today - the biggest drop in 6 years.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Turmoil Spreads: Ruble Replunges, Crude Craters, Yen Surges, Emerging Markets Tumbling





For those wondering if the CBR's intervention in the Russian FX market with its shocking emergency rate hike to 17% overnight calmed things, the answer is yes... for about two minutes. The USDRUB indeed tumbled nearly 10% to 59 and then promptly blew right back out, the Ruble crashing in panic selling and seemingly without any CBR market interventions, and at last check was freefalling through 72 74 76, and sending the Russian stock market plummeting by over 15%.

 
Tyler Durden's picture

Everyone Do The Safe-Haven Scramble





Always happy to look to the silver lining in markets, amid the total and utter carnage across global FX, commodity, and equity markets, there are a few markets benefiting from the scramble for a safe-haven. Gold (and Silver) prices, after dropping yesterday, has retraced all those losses and is up over $20 to $1215. Even more impressively, 10Y Treasury yields traded with a 2.00% handle (down 8-9bps today alone). Notably ultra-short-term US T-Bill yields have collapsed to zero with the Feb 2015s trading -0.5bps. Bunds are also bid (down 5bps) at fresh record-low yields of 56.6bps! While not a 'safe-haven" per se, JPY is aggressively bid also as leverage and risk unwinds carry trades and squeezes USDJPY lower (briefly touching 115.50).

 
Syndicate content
Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site!