Equity Markets

Futures Flat With Germany Closed; Sterling Slides On "Hard Brexit" Fears

With China, German and South Korea closed for holiday, it has been a relatively quiet day in overnight equity trading, especially in the one stock everyone is keeping a close eye on, Deutsche Bank, whose ADRs are trading fractionally lower, down under 1% in premarket trading. Cable plunged on "Hard Brexit" fears sending the FTSE100 to fresh 16 month highs.

Brexit Means March: Theresa May Will Trigger EU Divorce In Q1 Of 2017

After weeks of speculation on the UK's timetable for invoking Article 50, and eventually exiting the EU, Prime Minister Theresa May today announced she’ll begin the U.K.’s withdrawal from the European Union in the first quarter of 2017, ending speculation about the start of the 2-year Brexit process.

90 Days Later: Still No Signs Of Brexit 'Doom & Gloom'

For the first half of the year, we were warned early and often by authorities that the Brexit vote could be a calamity for the ages. For example, the IMF claimed that a “Leave” result would threaten to “cause severe damage”, while Standard and Poor’s said that it would “paralyze” investment in the UK. But, as Visual Capitalist's Jeff Desjardins notes, it turns out that the real Brexit casualty isn’t the UK economy – instead it is the reputation of the many professional economists who wrongly predicted doom and gloom as the likely aftermath.

Will The ECB Buy Stocks?

With The SNB and BOJ already neck deep in their equity-buying experimentation, and even Janet Yellen hinting at it for The Fed, the most pressing question on most liquidity-hunting central-planer-watchers is - when will Draghi start buying stocks? The short answer, from ABN AMRO, is ECB equity purchases are unlikely in the near term.. and even so, The ECB would be increasing the risk on its balance sheet for uncertain, and at best modest gains in economic growth and inflation.

Crude Declines As OPEC Deal Doubts Emerge; Futures Roll Over

After oil soared over 5% yesterday, its biggest jump since April, overnight skepticism and doubts have emerged about the viability and compliance with the deal, coupled with a boost in production by non-OPEC producers, and as a result WTI has dipped back under $47, down 0.5%, suggesting that the OPEC surge may be short-lived, and modestly pressuring US equity futures.

Futures Fail To Rebound As Deutsche Bank Tries To Comfort Markets That It Is "Fine"

After yesterday's "Hillary rally" in the US, the overnight's session has seen more risk-on sentiment as European stocks advanced, ignoring weakness in Asia as investors followed every twist of shares of beleaguered lender Deutsche Bank, whose CEO last night assured Bill readers that the bank is not seeking a bailout, which however was contradicted by a Zeit article this morning reporting that Germany may seek as much as s 25% "bailout" stake in a worst case scenario.

Global Stocks Tumble, US Futures Slide On Deutsche Bank Fears, Central Bank And Commodity Concerns

While today's biggest event for both markets and politics will be tonight's highly anticipated first presidential debate between Trump and Hillary, markets are waking up to some early turmoil in both Asia and Europe, with declines in banks and energy producers dragging down stock-markets around the world, pushing investors to once again seek the safety of government bonds and the yen.

Soothing Fed Sends Global Stocks, US Futures, Commodities Higher

Following the Fed's "hawkish hold" and the BOJ's "confused contradiction", global risk (and non-risk) assets got the green light, and as a result stocks and bonds rallied in Asia and Europe, with US equity futures rising another 0.4%, advancing with oil and industrial metals, as iron surged in Chinese trading.

FX & Bond Markets Ain't Buying What The Bank Of Japan Is Selling

Equity markets are stronger on the back of financials  - helped by BoJ's plan to steepen the Japanese bond curve - but judging by the strengthening in the Yen, FX markets are non-believers. The lack of additional easing is largely being heralded as a disappointment (no lower NIRP and no increased buying) and many are questioning the kneejerk bounce in stocks (as bank balance sheets face trauma from the 'reverse twist' effect on the long bonds).