European Central Bank

America Needs A Good, Old-Fashioned Economic Depression

A good, old-fashioned, pre-1929 depression (like the short-lived, eleven-month depression in 1920-1921, before the days of “modern” central banking and “enlightened” Keynesian intervention “cures”) is the only tonic that can clear out the malinvestment built up since the beginning of the fiat money era.

Frontrunning: July 22

  • Global stocks fall, UK PMIs flash Brexit recession warning (Reuters)
  • Trump's greatest hits, all in one speech (Reuters)
  • Donald Trump Accepts GOP Nomination, Promises to Fix America (WSJ)
  • Trump's America Grows More Ominous Over 13-Month Run (BBG)
  • Hillary Clinton: unwitting star of the Republican convention (FT)
  • Clinton faces pressure to pick VP who is tough on trade, Wall Street (Reuters)

Yen Soars, Stocks Slide After Kuroda Says "No Need Or Possibility For Helicopter Money"

In a surprising rejection of Ben Bernanke, BOJ governor Haruhiko Kuroda said that there will be no helicopter money in Japan, amid increasing speculation over monetary and fiscal policy in the world’s third-largest economy. Given the current institutional setting, there is "no need and no possibility for helicopter money," Kuroda said in a BBC Radio 4 program that was broadcast Thursday. “At this moment, the Bank of Japan has three options with quantitative and qualitative easing with negative interest rates."

So What Did The ECB Buy? "In Short, Almost Everything"

"So what did they buy? In short, almost everything. The ECB bought “topical” credits such as VW, Glencore and EdF. They showed little concern with taking credit risk by buying a range of low-BBB names. They bought “high yield” credits such as Telecom Italia and Lufthansa. They bought corporate bonds from US, UK and Swiss companies, and ironically, the ECB’s most popular purchase has been Deutsche Bahn – an issuer where bond yields are the most negative."

Hans-Hermann Hoppe: "Put Your Hope In Radical Decentralization"

"The EU is the first step on the way toward the creation of a European Super-State, and ultimately of a one-world government, dominated by the USA and its central bank, the FED... Don’t put your trust in democracy, but neither should you trust in a dictatorship. Rather, put your hope into radical political decentralization, not just in India and China, but everywhere."

European Central Banks Disclose Which Corporate Bonds They Own

Earlier today, alongside the ECB's latest weekly disclosure of total corporate bond purchases under the CSPP program, which as of July 15 had risen by approximately €2 billion to €10.427 billion, suggesting a daily purchase pace of about €400 million, Europe's various regional central banks also disclosed for the first time the CUSIP list of which specific bonds they had purchased over the past month and a half.

Who's Most Afraid Of Contagion From Italy's Bank Meltdown?

Contagion is the reason Italy’s banking crisis is all of a sudden Europe’s biggest existential threat. Greece’s intractable problems are out of sight, out of mind; Brexit momentarily spooked investors and bankers; but Italy’s banking woes have the potential to wipe out investors and undo over 60 years of supranational state-building in Europe.

70% Of German Bonds Are No Longer Eligible For ECB Purchases

The surge in sovereign debt since Britain’s vote to exit the European Union last month has pushed yields on about 70% of the securities in the $1.1-trillion Bloomberg Germany Sovereign Bond Index below the ECB’s -0.4% deposit rate, making them ineligible for the institution’s quantitative-easing program. For the euro area as a whole, the total rises to almost $2 trillion.

Gundlach Reveals His Portfolio Which Is "Outperforming Everyone Else's"

"People say, “What kind of portfolio is that?” I say it’s one that is outperforming everybody else’s. I mean, bonds are up more than 5%, gold is up substantially this year [28%], and gold miners have had over a 100% gain. This is a year when it hasn’t been that tough to earn 10% with a portfolio. Most people think this is a dead-money portfolio. They’ve got it wrong. The dead-money portfolio is the S&P 500."

Europe's Bank Crisis Arrives In Germany: €29 Billion Bremen Landesbank On The Verge Of Failure

It appears that some shipping loans gone bad could be the catalyst for Europe's banking crisis to finally breach the most impenetrable border of all, that of Germany. Because it is in Germany where we find what may be the next domino to fall as part of Europe's latest banking crisis incarnation: Bremen Landesbank, whose contingent convertible bonds have just cratered as a result of speculation that the bank's bailout is suddenly in jeopardy. 

EU Banks Crash To Crisis Lows As Funding Panic Accelerates

The signs are everywhere - if you choose to look - Europe's banking system is collapsing (no matter what Draghi has to offer). From record lows in Deutsche Bank and Credit Suisse to spiking default risk in Monte Paschi, the panic in Europe's funding markets (basis swaps collapsing) is palpable.