European Central Bank

Frontrunning: September 29

  • Stocks Jump as OPEC Splits Markets; Indian Assets Drop on Attack (BBG)
  • In U-Turn, Saudis Choose Higher Prices Over Free Oil Markets (BBG)
  • Congress Passes Spending Bill to Keep Government Running (WSJ)
  • Wells Fargo chief Stumpf heads to Hill with pressure mounting (Reuters)
  • Lawmakers Won’t Let Wells Fargo Forget Its Scandal Anytime Soon (BBG)

Peak Debt Complacency: Carmen "Different This Time" Reinhart Urges Debt Restructuring

[The establishment] needs no reminder of the historical record, but it bears noting that more than a dozen advanced economies received debt relief in one form or another during the depression of the 1930s. The approach to unwinding current debts is likely to vary considerably across countries, but it is time to place greater emphasis on debt restructuring (which comes with a menu of options) than on accumulating more debt.

Deutsche Denial Tsunami Begins: Draghi "Not ECB Fault", IMF "Solid Base"

It is becoming very clear that the Deutsche Bank debacle is getting very serious. How do we know? Simple - everyone is denying everything. Overnight DB CEO Cryan denied any need to raise capital or need a bailout; this morning ECB's Draghi denied low rates were responsible, and denied The IMF's statement the bank is systemically important; and now IMF's Lagarde is denying any need for government intervention.

The Banquet Of Consequences Is Being Served (By The Central Banking Cartel)

Last week, the Federal Reserve decided to keep US interest rates unchanged, marking its 96th month of life at the zero bound. Apparently, for all of its "data dependence", the Fed feels the economy could still benefit from *just* a little more of its ZIRP happy juice. But as anyone with a little common sense will tell you, More is not always better. It's quite possible to have too much of a good thing. And in its pursuit to kick the can for a little longer, the Fed has crossed a dangerous line.

Futures Fail To Rebound As Deutsche Bank Tries To Comfort Markets That It Is "Fine"

After yesterday's "Hillary rally" in the US, the overnight's session has seen more risk-on sentiment as European stocks advanced, ignoring weakness in Asia as investors followed every twist of shares of beleaguered lender Deutsche Bank, whose CEO last night assured Bill readers that the bank is not seeking a bailout, which however was contradicted by a Zeit article this morning reporting that Germany may seek as much as s 25% "bailout" stake in a worst case scenario.

The Global Housing Bubble Is Biggest In These Six Cities

In the latest report by UBS wealth Management, which compiles the bank's Real Estate Bubble Index,  it found a new champion for the title of "world's biggest housing bubble", namely a familiar name, Vancouver, but also that as many as six cities had made the "bubble" category, up from last year's two.

Germany "Other" Bank: Commerzbank To Fire 9,000, 18% Of Its Entire Workforce

Germany's second biggest bank, Commerzbank, is planning to cut around 9,000 jobs over the coming years as Germany's second biggest lender pushes ahead with a restructuring plan, Handelsblatt reported earlier today. citing unnamed sources in the finance industry. The round of layoffs would eliminate a massive 18% of the bank's entire workforce.

Global Stocks Tumble, US Futures Slide On Deutsche Bank Fears, Central Bank And Commodity Concerns

While today's biggest event for both markets and politics will be tonight's highly anticipated first presidential debate between Trump and Hillary, markets are waking up to some early turmoil in both Asia and Europe, with declines in banks and energy producers dragging down stock-markets around the world, pushing investors to once again seek the safety of government bonds and the yen.

"Hell To Pay" - The Final Condition For A Market Crash Is Falling Into Place

Our liquidity-drunk “markets” remain over-priced due to the chronic intervention of the global central banking cartel, which has demonstrated over and over again that it won't tolerate even the slightest drop in asset prices. Once faith in central banks is lost, their power to delay the deflationary day of reckoning goes with it. The stupendous amount of debt they have helped heap onto the financial system since 2008 will start going into default and the only question that will matter is: Who is going to eat the losses?