European Central Bank

German Top Court "Reluctantly" Rejects Challenges To ECB's OMT Program, Lists 6 Conditions

With traders already on edge in illiquid markets ahead of the Breferendum, one potential risk to sentiment today was the long-awaited decision by Germany’s powerful constitutional court whether Mario Draghi's OMT, or Outright Monetary Transactions, was constitutional. However, any lingering concerns were swept away when the Kardinals of Karlsruhe "reluctantly" ruled in favor of the one of the European Central Bank’s most important tools to fight financial crises, which however was caveated with six specific conditions.

Stocks, Sterling Rise As "Brexit" Fears Forgotten; Dollar Drops Ahead Of Yellen Speech

Tuesday's overnight price action has been a continuation of yesterday's Brexit relief rally, as investors focused on the two latest polls favorable to Remain in Thursday's referendum (while ignoring the YouGov poll which gave Leave a small lead), and hoping the doom and gloom by George Soros will convince the undecideds to vote against Leaving. As a result, global stocks continued their advance while pound extending the biggest rally since 2008.

Why Brexit Is Better For Britain

Mises argues that whenever the state meddles with the free market, it reduces the standard of living that had prevailed prior to any state intervention. Essentially, a Brexit will remove another layer of government intervention from the lives of Brits, and therefore there shouldn’t be any fear of a Brexit. On the contrary. A Brexit may hold the key to make Europe abandon a doomed course, bringing it to its senses and back onto the road of freedom and prosperity.

A Common Central Bank Tool: Fearmongering

Central bankers should not be treated as wise oracles whose guidance is desperately needed. Instead, we should throw off the tyranny of the PhD’s and embrace the decentralization of power that is desperately needed to allow civilization to thrive. Brexit would be a great way to start.

Will Brexit Give The US Negative Interest Rates?

One of the oddest things in this increasingly odd world is the spread of negative interest rates everywhere but in the US. One answer is that the Bank of Japan and the European Central Bank are buying up all the high-quality (and increasing amounts of low-quality) debt in their territories, thus forcing down rates, while the US Fed has stopped its own bond buying program. The other answer is that this is just one of those periodic anomalies that persist for a while and then get arbitraged away. And Brexit might be the catalyst for that phase change.

Here They Come: ECB Pledges To Bailout Markets In Case Of Brexit

The European Central Bank would publicly pledge to backstop financial markets in tandem with the Bank of England should Britain vote to leave the European Union, officials with knowledge of the matter told Reuters. "there will be a statement to do whatever it takes to maintain adequate market liquidity."

Soaring Brexit Fears Spark Global Flight To Safety, Send 10 Year Bunds Tumbling Below 0%

The UK EU referendum is suddenly totally dominant in financial markets. The increased focus comes as the leave campaign has gathered steam as 4 polls yesterday afternoon/evening put the 'leave' campaign ahead. As a result of the continued global scramble for safety, German 10Y bunds finally dropped below 0% for the first time ever, while global risk assets are red around the globe.

UK Establishment Loses The Mainstream Media: "Why I Am Voting To Leave The EU"

"Stripped of distractions, it comes down to an elemental choice: whether to restore the full self-government of this nation, or to continue living under a higher supranational regime, ruled by a European Council that we do not elect in any meaningful sense, and that the British people can never remove, even when it persists in error...Americans of all people should understand why a nation may wish to assert its independence."

Hedge Fund CIO Explains How "This Year's Money Will Be Made"

"This year’s money will be made when the cycle breaks." A stubbornly hawkish Fed could break the cycle, raising rates in a determined fashion, enduring a dollar rally, weaker equities. A persistently dovish Fed could interrupt the cycle, letting asset prices run, supported by a weaker dollar. Or an exogenous shock, like Brexit, could break the cycle too, reorienting the world.

Pictet: "The Pricing And Valuation Of Bonds No Longer Reflects Fundamentals" - Why This Matters

"Wicksellians believe that in today’s climate, where markets are being swamped with money pumped in by central banks via QE, long-term sovereign bond yields need to rise steeply to revert to their ‘natural’ rate of interest. An unexpected spike in inflation might be the trigger for this upward movement. According to proponents of this scenario, bonds would then be sent crashing. Conversely, the Fisherian camp believes that low government bond yields essentially reflect the anaemic state of the economy. Wicksellians are duly offloading their positions in government bonds, whereas Fisherians are building up theirs."