European Central Bank

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Gold forecasting is a mugs game at the best of times but given the uncertain geo-political situation, the fragile banking system and the very strong fundamentals for gold, it is hard to argue with Barnabas Gan of OCBC  or BMI. Gold should be meaningfully higher in the coming months and into 2017 as investors diversify into gold. Or rather we are likely to see dollars, euros, pounds and other fiat currencies continue to be devalued versus gold.

US Futures Pressured By European Weakness; Oil Flat, Dollar Rises

For the fourth day in a row, US traders arrive at their desks with US equity futures largely rangebound if with a modestly heavy bias, pressured by some recent weakness in European stocks, where DB continues to post modest gains following yesterday's report that Germany is pursuing "discrete talks" over the fate of the German lender. Oil has regained earlier losses following comments by Algeria's oil minister who said that OPEC could cut 1% more than agreed upon while sterling continues to slide on growing concerns of a "hard Brexit."

The Noose Is Tightening Quickly On The Global Economy

At bottom, it is not central bank stimulus and intervention alone that drives equities and bond markets; it is the naive faith and willful ignorance of average market participants.  There is a problem with this kind of economic model, however.  Reality is never kept in check indefinitely.  Fiscal truths will be exposed, one way or another.

European, EM Stocks Slide On ECB Taper Concerns; US Futures Flat

With China on holiday, overnight sessions remain relatively quiet: at this moment, S&P500 futures are little changed as European stocks fall for first day in seven, on yesterday's concern that the ECB is moving toward tightening monetary policy; Asian indices rose slightly for third day. WTI climbs to $49.40, the highest since June 30 after yesterday's surprisingly large API crude draw report.

Wall Street: The Trump-China Missing Link

If in the next two presidential debates Trump points to the crucial missing link in the whole plot – Wall Street - he might as well lock on as a surefire winner.

Frontrunning: September 29

  • Stocks Jump as OPEC Splits Markets; Indian Assets Drop on Attack (BBG)
  • In U-Turn, Saudis Choose Higher Prices Over Free Oil Markets (BBG)
  • Congress Passes Spending Bill to Keep Government Running (WSJ)
  • Wells Fargo chief Stumpf heads to Hill with pressure mounting (Reuters)
  • Lawmakers Won’t Let Wells Fargo Forget Its Scandal Anytime Soon (BBG)

Peak Debt Complacency: Carmen "Different This Time" Reinhart Urges Debt Restructuring

[The establishment] needs no reminder of the historical record, but it bears noting that more than a dozen advanced economies received debt relief in one form or another during the depression of the 1930s. The approach to unwinding current debts is likely to vary considerably across countries, but it is time to place greater emphasis on debt restructuring (which comes with a menu of options) than on accumulating more debt.

Deutsche Denial Tsunami Begins: Draghi "Not ECB Fault", IMF "Solid Base"

It is becoming very clear that the Deutsche Bank debacle is getting very serious. How do we know? Simple - everyone is denying everything. Overnight DB CEO Cryan denied any need to raise capital or need a bailout; this morning ECB's Draghi denied low rates were responsible, and denied The IMF's statement the bank is systemically important; and now IMF's Lagarde is denying any need for government intervention.

The Banquet Of Consequences Is Being Served (By The Central Banking Cartel)

Last week, the Federal Reserve decided to keep US interest rates unchanged, marking its 96th month of life at the zero bound. Apparently, for all of its "data dependence", the Fed feels the economy could still benefit from *just* a little more of its ZIRP happy juice. But as anyone with a little common sense will tell you, More is not always better. It's quite possible to have too much of a good thing. And in its pursuit to kick the can for a little longer, the Fed has crossed a dangerous line.